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NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2011
The problem: Giant potholes pockmarked a road in the Canton Industrial Area. The backstory: One complaint unites residents of Central Maryland from the shores of Pasadena to the rolling farmland in Sparks: potholes. If the calls to Watchdog's help line and email address are any indication, potholes and other road-surface issues are the biggest annoyance facing people who regularly traverse the streets in and around Baltimore. But many people say they don't know whom to call to report these problems.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
As Alice Ross rumbled across Hanover Street's Vietnam Veterans Memorial Bridge early on the morning of Baltimore's most recent snowstorm, her Subaru smashed into a large pothole obscured by the accumulating snow. The 61-year-old Halethorpe resident, on her way to drive a friend to a medical appointment, instead continued directly to her car dealership in Glen Burnie, she said - where she was met with a $1,100 mechanic's bill. "I was petrified," Ross said of the incident, which nearly sent her off the bridge.
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NEWS
March 11, 1994
Just when you thought it was safe to go on the road again. . .Not to jinx ourselves, but there's a chance we've seen the last of the snow, sleet and other "weather events" that can make even a short drive to the market a harrowing experience. Yet the effects on roadways from what is generally considered the worst local winter in decades will not be fading anytime soon.Goodbye, ice. Hello, potholes.This trying winter has produced the biggest collection of street divots in recent memory. Divots is actually too tame a word for some of the holes that lately have separated countless cars from their hubcaps.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | March 4, 2014
When discussions turn to the government, they usually relate to a cast of elected officials ranging from town council member to president of the United States. Invariably, everyone with a knowledge of the comings and goings of these people who have been elected to office has a view of government that is deeply colored by impressions left by the people entrusted by the voters - reasonable or otherwise - to be at the top of the managerial pyramid. Meanwhile, there's a government that operates where the rubber meets the road, and this harsh winter has left some of those public servants with few opportunities to take a breath.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Sun Staff Writer | February 3, 1994
They are cosmetic surgeons working to smooth the pockmarked face of Baltimore.And they have been very busy.Using shovels, rakes, tampers and mountains of a gooey gravel and asphalt mix, work crews for the City that Reads have been laboring to save motorists from the City that Knocks Front Ends Out of Whack.Since the big snow and ice storms hit town Jan. 17, a fleet of 30 repair trucks has been fixing 1,000 potholes a day.Before the fiscal year ends June 30, the city will have spent $1 million to fill potholes, at a cost of about $25 per hole.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 6, 2011
As my car bounces and rattles over yet another pothole, and I look up at the price of a gallon of regular gasoline — about $3.30 — I have the following question: Is anybody ticked off about this? We were paying about $2.70 a year ago. I mean, I understand there has been unrest in North Africa and the Middle East, and this time there's something seismic going on. But when the price at the pump goes up like this, I don't believe it's because of anything real, such as a drop in the production of crude in Libya.
SPORTS
By George Diaz | September 15, 2010
RICHMOND, Va. — Joie Chitwood has a quirky sense of humor. Before a meet-and-greet with the media at Richmond last weekend, he read a letter from NASCAR that was addressed to him on July 12, 1995: "While we certainly appreciate your interest in NASCAR, we regrettably do not have a position available at this time. " It was signed, "Doug Fritz, director of marketing. " Fritz, standing nearby, got a nice chuckle out of the story. Fritz is now president of Richmond International Speedway.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | November 13, 1999
AN OPTIMIST is a guy who believes the potholes in the alley are half full, not half empty.That is what I told myself this week as I made yet another phone call trying to get the potholes fixed in a two-block stretch of the alley running behind my house. It was the third time in four months that I had called "pothole central" (technically, the complaint line run by the Baltimore City Public Works Department).Every time I call I try to be as upbeat as the cheerful fellow who answers that phone.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
As Alice Ross rumbled across Hanover Street's Vietnam Veterans Memorial Bridge early on the morning of Baltimore's most recent snowstorm, her Subaru smashed into a large pothole obscured by the accumulating snow. The 61-year-old Halethorpe resident, on her way to drive a friend to a medical appointment, instead continued directly to her car dealership in Glen Burnie, she said - where she was met with a $1,100 mechanic's bill. "I was petrified," Ross said of the incident, which nearly sent her off the bridge.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | February 6, 1994
The recent onslaught of ice, snow and freezing rain has left Carroll roads with raised sections of pavement and treacherous dips. But the worst is yet to come, road maintenance experts say.When warm weather returns, road sections that have been forced up by freezing water will collapse and become gaping potholes."
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
The promise of warm weather and the threat of more rain through the rest of this week have pushed the State Highway Administration to craft a two-pronged plan for its continuing winter clean-up operations. The focus: potholes and drainage. Recent cold snaps and snowfalls have left many roadways crumbling in spots, the result of freezing water cracking surfaces and plows and layers of salt compounding the damage. Warmer weather is preferable to cold in fixing pot holes. High temperatures from Wednesday through the weekend are expected to hover between 40 and 60 degrees, according to the National Weather Service.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2013
Most weekday mornings, late spring through late summer, Terry Weller and George Foster climb into a bright yellow truck and fire up lasers, high-definition cameras and a bank of digital recorders before hitting the road. Weller and Foster are two of the state's pothole detectives. Their laboratory on wheels is a $1.3 million truthmobile from which asphalt cannot hide its faults. Cracks, bumps and ruts lose their anonymity to ARAN - the Automatic Road Analyzer - a tool that finds trouble before it finds motorists' front tires and suspensions.
EXPLORE
October 31, 2011
The Roland Park ciclovia on Oct. 23 was well attended on a cool, sunny Sunday. For the first time, I rode a bike on Roland Avenue. This was the first time I had ridden a bike in the ciclovia and the first time I had ridden in the street itself. As a child, everyone rode on sidewalks, and I have not had a bike since. Even without cars whizzing by, and few riders at 9 a.m., I had to be careful when riding in the ciclovia. Roland Avenue is rut city. A small child on a bike fell over near me when her training wheel stuck in one of the long ruts that run up and down what is supposed to be the grand boulevard of the area.
NEWS
September 9, 2011
Yet again, for the second time in under six months, my car and I have fallen victim to a gaping pothole, both times on Forest Park between Security Boulevard and Garrison. I begin to wonder if the city of Baltimore does not have an agreement with tire repair shops for a kickback when residents have to repeatedly get tires replaced due to shoddy maintenance on the roads. Apparently, the city has plenty of funds to pour into speed and red light cameras. How about funneling some of the fines back to the taxpayers and fix the roads?
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | July 13, 2011
If you're plagued by potholes in your community, perhaps this week's Consumer Website of the Week can help. I write The Sun's Watchdog feature, and this week we tackled the ubiquitous pothole --- helping one Dundalk man figure out who to call for craters in Canton. But we also provided contact information, including some websites, to report road surface issues. People within Baltimore can call 311 to submit a service request for potholes or other problems. You can also call 410-396-5352 to report a city problem when you’re elsewhere.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2011
The problem: Giant potholes pockmarked a road in the Canton Industrial Area. The backstory: One complaint unites residents of Central Maryland from the shores of Pasadena to the rolling farmland in Sparks: potholes. If the calls to Watchdog's help line and email address are any indication, potholes and other road-surface issues are the biggest annoyance facing people who regularly traverse the streets in and around Baltimore. But many people say they don't know whom to call to report these problems.
NEWS
March 29, 1993
It looms in the middle of the street like the gaping mouth of a hungry creature in the pavement.The jagged asphalt rim is its teeth, the shallow pit its stomach. The wheels of unsuspecting drivers are its prey.Mistakenly drive into a pothole, and you will feel the jolt of your front-end alignment going out of whack, of your tire getting ripped, your rim dented, your strut bent.Somewhere, a mechanic must be smiling.Potholes always flourish in the waning days of winter, but the blizzard two weeks ago produced a bumper crop.
NEWS
May 23, 2011
John Fuller asks the wrong question about William Donald Schaefer's estate ("How did Schaefer get so rich?" May 22)). The questions should be: What made Mr. Schaefer prefer serving people over spending his ample public salaries on expensive homes, fancy cars and exotic vacations? Why did he roam the streets and alleys of Baltimore over the weekends to get potholes fixed and trash removed rather than play 18-holes of golf at a country club? And how long will it take before another public servant like Mr. Schaefer comes along?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2011
After getting chased off the Johns Hopkins Hospital campus for the second time in two weeks, then shooed away from Harbor East where she only paused to strategize, Irene Smith pulled her orange truck, sloshing with soup, to a spot near Fallsway and Gay Street, trying to salvage the day. Her motor had barely turned off before a hotel manager told her she had to move. When she pulled forward to satisfy the hotel manager, a meter maid warned her away from the two-hour parking area. After pulling up still farther, a property owner began yelling that Smith's truck — with its gourmet, organic bisques and chowders — would attract the wrong element.
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