Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPotato Skins
IN THE NEWS

Potato Skins

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Maria Hiaasen | July 23, 1997
* ITEM: INLAND VALLEY MUNCHSKIN MEALS* WHAT YOU GET: 20 ounces, or 10 potato skins* COST: $4.59* TIME TO PREPARE: 15 minutes in conventional oven or 4 minutes in the microwave* REVIEW: Munchskin Meals tastes just like a restaurant order of loaded potato skins but costs a couple of bucks less. Not sold yet? These spuds tasted equally good from conventional oven or microwave, and the kit includes ample amounts of cheese, bacon and sour cream with chives. Junk food junkies, go directly to your grocer's frozen food section for a hit.Pub Date: 7/23/97
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2013
As the hosts of one of the most coveted annual Super Bowl parties in Maryland, Steve and Zivah Ring have obligations to uphold. So what if they had planned on spending much of the winter in sunny Florida? After the Ravens secured the AFC championship two weeks ago, the Rings hopped a plane back to frigid Baltimore. "We came into town just to throw this party," said Zivah Ring of Stevenson. "And we're leaving again right afterwards. " Over the past 47 years, Super Bowl Sunday has morphed from just another blah winter weekend day into an unofficial national holiday.
Advertisement
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | May 13, 2006
It's time to fess up. In a column last fall I mentioned starting a meal at the Prime Rib restaurant with an appetizer called Greenberg potato skins, a dish many fans feel is one of Baltimore's best ways to begin a meal. At that time, I credited the dish to the late Teddy Greenberg, a Baltimore wholesale children's clothing manufacturer and a regular at the restaurant who requested that it be put on the menu. The Prime Rib chef complied and made his own changes to the concept of spud skins served with sour cream.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2011
Shirlee S. Rice, a homemaker and artist known for her culinary skills, died of lung disease Feb. 21 at her Pikesville home. She was 95. Born Shirley Siegel in Baltimore and raised on Chauncey Avenue in Reservoir Hill, she was a Western High School graduate who earned a degree at the Maryland Institute College of Art and studied piano at the Peabody Conservatory. Her father, Milton Siegel, was a partner in the Siegel Rothschild and Gans Bros. umbrella-making firm in downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | October 15, 2005
Has there ever been a slow Saturday night in the last 40 years at the Prime Rib, where even the signature leopard-skin carpeting remains the same since opening night, Oct. 19, 1965? The cool 1960s came to roost here -- and never left. A bartender mixes a Manhattan. A combo -- drums, piano, bass -- between the dining room and bar launches into "Fly Me to the Moon." The conversation level never droops. Families, friends, business types sit on black patent-leather chairs around a table under a 1920s French art deco poster.
NEWS
By Linda Geeson and Linda Geeson,Ocean City Bureau of The Sun | June 30, 1991
One of the best reasons to go to Harrison's Harbor Watch is the view. The multilevel restaurant boasts tall windows that overlook the Ocean City inlet and Assateague Island. Even if you're seated on the boardwalk side of the restaurant, as we were, the windows offer a great place to people-watch. I counted 11 people posing for snapshots with the giant anchor at the O.C. Lifesaving Station Museum during our dinner.The other reason to visit Harrison's Harbor Watch is the seafood. A large chalkboard at the entrance to the dining room lets visitors know immediately what's fresh in the kitchen each evening.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | July 27, 1991
OLDE PHILADELPHIA INN9510 Philadelphia Road, White Marsh. Hours: 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays; 10 a.m. to midnight Fridays and Saturdays and 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sundays. Call 687-5757.Hardly anybody calls this friendly, appetite-satisfying place by its real name. Go there once and it becomes "the OPI," one of those tavern/restaurant establishments that have earned the honored title of neighborhood eatery.Previously located across Philadelphia Road in a quaint old corner house, the restaurant moved a couple of years ago into this corner of a shopping center.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1998
J. T. Ashley's Grille is not a bad place to grab a meal -- if you don't mind average food and slow service.We found the restaurant almost empty early on a recent Saturday evening and were seated immediately. The decor was a clash between the Miami-style pastel walls -- salmon-pink -- and the grill-house feel of the green marble columns and faux oak tables.The piped-in pop medley featuring The Supremes and Top 40 music created a weird feel and was a little loud.But overall, we got a lot of feeling -- thanks in part to the dim lighting -- and the restaurant was warm and comfortable.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Restaurant Critic | November 20, 1992
The name comes from Treehouse's mezzanine of blond wood, which overlooks a large bar area and is decorated with photos of trees. It does have an airy feel to it, but that's undercut by the two television screens, one extra-large, at the bar below. It's half sports bar, half sit-down restaurant with a children's menu; the combination doesn't quite work.Still, the Treehouse is one of those restaurants every neighborhood needs. It's the place where you can get a decent hamburger and a beer, homemade soup and something a little fancier like a crabcake dinner if you feel like splurging.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | January 25, 2011
Sometimes you look at a decades-old photo of yourself at the beach and are struck by the thought that you should have worn more skimpy two-pieces while you had the chance. Sometimes you watch a mystery in a movie theater and realize you just don't enjoy it as much as you would at home, where you can use the remote to go back if you missed a clue. And sometimes you go to heat up your soup in the office microwave and glance at the controls and think, "What is this country coming to?" In my company's newly remodeled kitchenette sit two General Electric microwave ovens (because heaven knows we efficient Americans cannot be expected to wait while someone else flash-cooks his meal in less than two minutes)
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | January 25, 2011
Sometimes you look at a decades-old photo of yourself at the beach and are struck by the thought that you should have worn more skimpy two-pieces while you had the chance. Sometimes you watch a mystery in a movie theater and realize you just don't enjoy it as much as you would at home, where you can use the remote to go back if you missed a clue. And sometimes you go to heat up your soup in the office microwave and glance at the controls and think, "What is this country coming to?" In my company's newly remodeled kitchenette sit two General Electric microwave ovens (because heaven knows we efficient Americans cannot be expected to wait while someone else flash-cooks his meal in less than two minutes)
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | May 13, 2006
It's time to fess up. In a column last fall I mentioned starting a meal at the Prime Rib restaurant with an appetizer called Greenberg potato skins, a dish many fans feel is one of Baltimore's best ways to begin a meal. At that time, I credited the dish to the late Teddy Greenberg, a Baltimore wholesale children's clothing manufacturer and a regular at the restaurant who requested that it be put on the menu. The Prime Rib chef complied and made his own changes to the concept of spud skins served with sour cream.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 9, 2006
How best to describe Dizzy Issie's, an agreeably ramshackle bar and restaurant wedged onto a corner of Remington Avenue and 30th Street, near Johns Hopkins? Perhaps a partial listing of the decor will paint a picture. Downstairs, customers will find two extremely worn barbershop chairs, a Charlie McCarthy doll suspended near the front door, plastic hearts dangling in the windows, and Andy Warhol's Marilyn Monroe. The ceilings are stamped tin, painted a rust color, the floors are gray linoleum.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | October 15, 2005
Has there ever been a slow Saturday night in the last 40 years at the Prime Rib, where even the signature leopard-skin carpeting remains the same since opening night, Oct. 19, 1965? The cool 1960s came to roost here -- and never left. A bartender mixes a Manhattan. A combo -- drums, piano, bass -- between the dining room and bar launches into "Fly Me to the Moon." The conversation level never droops. Families, friends, business types sit on black patent-leather chairs around a table under a 1920s French art deco poster.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | October 24, 2001
AS SOON AS the air turned cool and the leaves started to scatter, I began sweet-potato scheming. It is a behavioral pattern I lapse into every autumn. I start dreaming up ways to get my kids to eat sweet potatoes. As happens with many parental missions, I have been working at this one for so long that I have pretty much forgotten why I got started. I know that sweet potatoes pack a lot of nutritional wallop. They are so loaded with vitamins A, C, E, folate, iron, copper, calcium and fiber that they have developed a reputation as the healthiest vegetable on the planet.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | February 28, 1999
Potatoes are rarely more irresistible than at breakfast. To do justice to these simple dishes, don't pick just any old potato from the bin. For hash browns or cottage fries, choose a red or yellow thin-skinned, waxy variety that holds its shape when boiled or steamed. For potato skins, pick rough-skinned baking potatoes such as russet or Idaho.Hash BrownsServes 65 or 6 medium waxy potatoes (about 2 pounds), unpeeled1/4 cup finely chopped onion1/2 teaspoon saltpinch pepper2 tablespoons each: butter and olive oilCook potatoes, in their jackets, in boiling salted water until about half-cooked (15 to 20 minutes)
FEATURES
By MARY MAUSHARD and MARY MAUSHARD,The Evening SunThe Sun The Sunday Sun | June 8, 1991
Tamber's Restaurant, 3327 St. Paul St., 243-0383. Although touted as "Nifty Fifties Dining," Tamber's seems to offers a blend of someone's '50s favorites and '80s in-food. The menu includes shrimp salad on cheese toast ($5.75) and home-style meatloaf ++ with mashed potatoes or French fries and gravy ($5.95) alongside Buffalo wings ($4.95), potato skins ($3.25) and two flavors of frozen yogurt. This selection of foods from today and those from a little while back makes Tamber's a good place to dine with children.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2011
Shirlee S. Rice, a homemaker and artist known for her culinary skills, died of lung disease Feb. 21 at her Pikesville home. She was 95. Born Shirley Siegel in Baltimore and raised on Chauncey Avenue in Reservoir Hill, she was a Western High School graduate who earned a degree at the Maryland Institute College of Art and studied piano at the Peabody Conservatory. Her father, Milton Siegel, was a partner in the Siegel Rothschild and Gans Bros. umbrella-making firm in downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1998
J. T. Ashley's Grille is not a bad place to grab a meal -- if you don't mind average food and slow service.We found the restaurant almost empty early on a recent Saturday evening and were seated immediately. The decor was a clash between the Miami-style pastel walls -- salmon-pink -- and the grill-house feel of the green marble columns and faux oak tables.The piped-in pop medley featuring The Supremes and Top 40 music created a weird feel and was a little loud.But overall, we got a lot of feeling -- thanks in part to the dim lighting -- and the restaurant was warm and comfortable.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.