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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2003
Mary E. Colombo of Springdale, Ark., requested a recipe for potato pancakes. She is 89 years old and has lost the recipe she liked to use. She cut up raw potatoes and added them to other ingredients in a blender. She hopes someone has a recipe. Belle Elkins of Salisbury, N.C., writes: "I really hope this is the recipe that Mary E. Colombo was requesting. It's excellent with baked stuffed pork chops. You can also try these with applesauce or sour cream. So glad if I could help." Potato Pancakes Makes about 8 pancakes 3 cups raw potatoes, cubed 2 eggs 1/4 cup flour 1 small onion, cut into quarters 1 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon baking powder Wash, peel and cut up potatoes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2012
Johnny's, the fifth restaurant from Baltimore restaurateurs Tony Foreman and Cindy Wolf, is scheduled to open Tuesday morning in Roland Park.  They're not fooling around either. Johnny's goes straight into a seven-day, three-meal schedule. • Get a sneak peek: Johnny's in Roland Park [Pictures] If you show up for breakfast at Johnny's on opening day, here's what's in store for you. For starters, there's a super geeked-out coffee program, supervised by Lindsay DiFabbio.
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FEATURES
By Faye Levy and Faye Levy,Contributing Writer Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 1, 1993
The eight-day Jewish holiday of Hanukkah (this year beginning at sundown Dec. 8) is, in many people's minds, the Festival of Potato Pancakes. These pancakes, or "latkes" as they are called in Yiddish, have become the symbol of the holiday and are a must for any Hanukkah get-together. Parties for family and friends, rather than formal dinners, are the most popular way to celebrate Hanukkah.The custom of serving fried foods, such as potato pancakes, grew out of the miracle of the oil, the central theme of Hanukkah.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special To The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2011
It was a roaring hot day, and the dark, cozy bar and dining room inside One-Eyed Mike's was packed. "It's an hour wait if you want to be seated inside," a bartender said. "We can seat you immediately outside. " That was fine with us — the dining area at One-Eyed Mike's is open and bright, and feels like a garden party. The atmosphere is certainly worth a trip. But it's hard to say the same for the food. Hidden off Broadway from the rest of Fell's Point watering holes, One-Eyed Mike's serves an older crowd — despite its pirate theme.
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren and Gerri Kobren,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1996
For generations at Hanukkah, it was always the same: Mealtime meant potato latkes. Made large enough for a supper side dish or dainty enough for hors d'oeuvres, these pancakes of grated potato, sparked with onion and fried to crisp delectability, have been the quintessential food for the holiday.But in recent years, the latke has moved upscale. Tomorrow night, as Jewish families prepare to mark the beginning of Hanukkah -- an eight-day celebration of the 164 B.C. victory of the Maccabee rebels against Syrian conquerors -- what's on the dinner table may come as something of a surprise.
FEATURES
By Joan Nathan and Joan Nathan,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 9, 1998
"Latkes, like bagels, have gone mainstream," said Michael Batterberry, editor-in-chief of Food Arts Magazine, as he recently dipped his fork into - what else? - a crispy, plump, potato pancake.Although latkes may be ubiquitous, served at many restaurants year-round throughout the country, they are served once a year in many Jewish American homes as a symbolic food on Hanukkah, which begins this year at sundown on Sunday.The holiday celebrates the victory of the Jewish Maccabee brothers over Antiochus of Assyria in 164 B.C. When they returned to the ransacked temple, the Maccabees found a tiny bit of sacred olive oil that miraculously lasted not one, but eight days; the miracle is commemorated by eight days of lighting candles.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | March 1, 2000
* Item: Fresh From the Start Potatoes * What you get: 3 to 4 servings * Cost: About $1 to $1.75 * Preparation time: Use straight from package in a variety of recipes * Review: I'm sure potato peeling is becoming a lost art for many people. But as someone who tends to find the task loathsome, I can't help but be thrilled by the number of pre-washed, peeled and cut potato products now on the market. Fresh From the Start Potatoes are partially cooked, making them even more convenient. Following a recipe on the package, I used the Red Bliss Potatoes to make Herb Roasted Reds.
FEATURES
By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | November 18, 1991
YOU WANT MY WIFE'S recipe for potato pancakes?" Slats Grobnik asked. "And the chicken soup with noodles? Or the meatloaf with lots of oatmeal mixed in it? And macaroni and cheese?"What has brought on this outburst of culinary interest?"Gettin' ready. And if you're smart, you will, too. Buy a few sacks of potatoes and onions. Stash 'em away in a cool place. Keep the grater handy."What are you planning, a pancake party?"Boy, you got a short memory. Didja eat potato pancakes when we were kids?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Marriam Shah, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2010
This weekend's Polish Festival will include food stands, a staple in ethnic showcases. The treats served are easy to carry around so you don't miss out on any of the festivities, but don't think their portability takes away from their authenticity. Coordinator Maryann Fredrick says that these foods are true to tradition and will entice people to come to the inner harbor. The menu she organized includes such favorites as: • Kielbasa (Polish Sausage): This recipe calls for pork, more pork, and a fair amount of garlic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | September 15, 1995
Ze Mean Bean may be the ultimate in trendy "fusion" restaurants. It offers both Slavic specialties and coffee house fare. For example, your sandwich of roast turkey, Brie and sprouts comes with -- I'm not kidding -- a side of pirogi (potato and cheese dumplings).Fells Point's newest coffee bar doesn't look all that trendy, although it's a very appealing spot, newly renovated and quite comfortable. In the center of the dining room is a fine red brocade Victorian couch with a potted palm or two around it. It gives the room a kind of funky dignity, as if the lobby of a grand hotel had been filled with cafe tables.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Marriam Shah, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2010
This weekend's Polish Festival will include food stands, a staple in ethnic showcases. The treats served are easy to carry around so you don't miss out on any of the festivities, but don't think their portability takes away from their authenticity. Coordinator Maryann Fredrick says that these foods are true to tradition and will entice people to come to the inner harbor. The menu she organized includes such favorites as: • Kielbasa (Polish Sausage): This recipe calls for pork, more pork, and a fair amount of garlic.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | May 9, 2007
Perhaps it is because they are among the first promising crops that pop out of the long-dead ground. Or maybe it is because my once--strong resistance to them was worn down by one of their biggest fans. For whatever reason, this spring I have become a fan of green onions. I used to call them scallions. But along with my conversion to green onions, I got an education regarding their names. The authentic scallion, I have learned, is a specific type of immature onion. Its bulb or bottom has straight sides and is not wider than the base of its leaves.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 26, 2003
The carryout food at the Suburban House brought with it an imperative: Go find a ruler. Several of the dishes seemed a bit out of scale. Not absurdly out of scale like the touristy delis in New York - hey, who doesn't like a pound of bacon on a BLT? - but enough to let you know you are definitely getting your money's worth. But the good news is that the quality of the food, as well as the size, is also above average at this longtime Pikesville eatery. Carryout is handled in a separate room attached to the Suburban House's sit-down restaurant.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2003
Mary E. Colombo of Springdale, Ark., requested a recipe for potato pancakes. She is 89 years old and has lost the recipe she liked to use. She cut up raw potatoes and added them to other ingredients in a blender. She hopes someone has a recipe. Belle Elkins of Salisbury, N.C., writes: "I really hope this is the recipe that Mary E. Colombo was requesting. It's excellent with baked stuffed pork chops. You can also try these with applesauce or sour cream. So glad if I could help." Potato Pancakes Makes about 8 pancakes 3 cups raw potatoes, cubed 2 eggs 1/4 cup flour 1 small onion, cut into quarters 1 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon baking powder Wash, peel and cut up potatoes.
NEWS
December 9, 2001
JUST FOR PARENTS Advice and strategies to help your children read Holiday Hanukkah is a festival of lights Exploring the ways everyone has of celebrating together at this time of the year helps people feel connected to each other during the holiday season. Tonight Jews around the world will celebrate the first night of Hanukkah, The Festival of Lights. This holiday commemorates events that took place over 2,300 years ago in the land of Judea, which is now Israel. Long ago the Syrian King, Antiochus, ordered the Jewish people to reject their God, their religion and their customs.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | March 1, 2000
* Item: Fresh From the Start Potatoes * What you get: 3 to 4 servings * Cost: About $1 to $1.75 * Preparation time: Use straight from package in a variety of recipes * Review: I'm sure potato peeling is becoming a lost art for many people. But as someone who tends to find the task loathsome, I can't help but be thrilled by the number of pre-washed, peeled and cut potato products now on the market. Fresh From the Start Potatoes are partially cooked, making them even more convenient. Following a recipe on the package, I used the Red Bliss Potatoes to make Herb Roasted Reds.
NEWS
By Martha B. Walter | December 11, 1998
A MINOR holiday for a minority's religion, Hanukkah is about drawing the line, saying you'll assimilate so much and no more. But in America, how much is so much?In her memoir, "Miriam's Kitchen," published last year, Elizabeth Ehrlich describes how conflicted she used to feel sitting down to a holiday feast of goose prepared by her aunt who married a non-Jew. Decades of English literature had made the goose seem as Christmassy as the ham that stood next to it.Ms. Ehrlich's book is about finding her way back to Jewish traditions she had abandoned or never known.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | May 9, 2007
Perhaps it is because they are among the first promising crops that pop out of the long-dead ground. Or maybe it is because my once--strong resistance to them was worn down by one of their biggest fans. For whatever reason, this spring I have become a fan of green onions. I used to call them scallions. But along with my conversion to green onions, I got an education regarding their names. The authentic scallion, I have learned, is a specific type of immature onion. Its bulb or bottom has straight sides and is not wider than the base of its leaves.
NEWS
By Martha B. Walter | December 11, 1998
A MINOR holiday for a minority's religion, Hanukkah is about drawing the line, saying you'll assimilate so much and no more. But in America, how much is so much?In her memoir, "Miriam's Kitchen," published last year, Elizabeth Ehrlich describes how conflicted she used to feel sitting down to a holiday feast of goose prepared by her aunt who married a non-Jew. Decades of English literature had made the goose seem as Christmassy as the ham that stood next to it.Ms. Ehrlich's book is about finding her way back to Jewish traditions she had abandoned or never known.
FEATURES
By Joan Nathan and Joan Nathan,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 9, 1998
"Latkes, like bagels, have gone mainstream," said Michael Batterberry, editor-in-chief of Food Arts Magazine, as he recently dipped his fork into - what else? - a crispy, plump, potato pancake.Although latkes may be ubiquitous, served at many restaurants year-round throughout the country, they are served once a year in many Jewish American homes as a symbolic food on Hanukkah, which begins this year at sundown on Sunday.The holiday celebrates the victory of the Jewish Maccabee brothers over Antiochus of Assyria in 164 B.C. When they returned to the ransacked temple, the Maccabees found a tiny bit of sacred olive oil that miraculously lasted not one, but eight days; the miracle is commemorated by eight days of lighting candles.
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