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By PROVIDENCE JOURNAL-BULLETIN | December 3, 1995
Mr. Potato Head -- the first toy ever to be advertised on television -- made his big screen debut in the new Disney film, "Toy Story."The toy -- a plastic potato with removable eyes, nose and ears -- isn't the only Hasbro product to appear in the computer-animated movie.The film, about a roomful of toys that come to life, also features such Baby Boomer favorites as Battleship, Candy Land, Mousetrap, Parcheesi, Life, Scrabble and Tinkertoy."We think it's a wonderful film and we think it will increase sales of our core brands," said Hasbro spokesman Wayne Charness.
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NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Reporter | July 1, 2007
Summer is here. It's time for kids to idle away the days on a shady front porch or in a cool basement. Among their playthings are those that likely entertained their baby boomer parents or grandparents: Silly Putty, Play-Doh or maybe super-spud Mr. Potato Head. The baby boom birth years (1946-1964) coincide with a fertile period of toy innovation that produced a wealth of silicon chip-free products still on the market. In other incarnations, most of these toys predate the boomer years, says Mark Rich, author of 101 Greatest Baby Boomer Toys.
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NEWS
September 6, 2000
Visit these Web sites to find the answers, then go to www.4Kids.org / detectives / . * When was Mr. Potato Head "born"? * Which is the smallest section of the Food Pyramid Guide? * What does K. Millwood say about kids throwing curve balls? HI-TECH SPUD It's Mr. Potato Head, known and loved the world over. He's so famous and has such "a peel," who knows what he'll be up to. But now you can always "ketchup" with him on the Internet at his officially silly site at www.mrpotatohead.com / , the animated place to find the random arms and noses of the whole Potato Head family.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | December 1, 2002
Everything old is new again, at least when it comes to toys. Take a stroll through the average toy store this holiday season and you may notice a theme -- call it deja vu with a twist. Traditional playthings dominate the shelves, but these aren't your parents' toys. They have computer chips and sound effects, gizmos and doohickeys. But underneath it all, they're an awful lot like what kids played with a generation ago. "We're in a whole retro trend," says Maria Weiskott, editor-in-chief of Playthings Magazine, which covers the toy industry.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Reporter | July 1, 2007
Summer is here. It's time for kids to idle away the days on a shady front porch or in a cool basement. Among their playthings are those that likely entertained their baby boomer parents or grandparents: Silly Putty, Play-Doh or maybe super-spud Mr. Potato Head. The baby boom birth years (1946-1964) coincide with a fertile period of toy innovation that produced a wealth of silicon chip-free products still on the market. In other incarnations, most of these toys predate the boomer years, says Mark Rich, author of 101 Greatest Baby Boomer Toys.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | October 6, 1997
Mr. Potato Head on the back of a quarter? Or the Nike swoosh? Or the Golden Gate Bridge?These are a few of the ideas -- silly and serious -- being batted around as Congress completes a proposal to let every state put its own artwork on the reverse side of America's most used coin.Starting in 1999, George Washington and his silver pigtail would head a series of redesigned tails. Five new coins would be minted each year for nationwide use, honoring states in the order they were admitted to the union.
FEATURES
By Fort Worth Star-Telegram | March 29, 1993
JOSHUA, Texas -- Remember Mr. Potato Head?If you do, you're probably a baby boomer. And you're likely to recall with fondness the toys of your childhood.Carol Turpen remembers not only Mr. Potato Head but also Hot Wheels, toy guns based on the "Bonanza" television series and many other baby boomer playthings. She's so enamored of old toys, in fact, that she has parlayed her interest into what approaches a full-time job.Ms. Turpen is the author of "Baby Boomer Toys and Collectibles" (Schiffer Publishing, $29.95 in paperback)
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts | October 8, 2000
MIAMI -- Maybe you've already heard about the racist potato. If not, let me fill you in. It seems that in an effort to drum up tourism, the state of Rhode Island has dotted its landscape with 6-foot statues of Mr. Potato Head wearing various guises and going by various pun-filled names. Edgar Allan Poe-tato and things of that nature. And all was well in the smallest of the United States until a woman named Onna Moniz-John caught sight of "Tourist Tater" in the local paper. He's wearing a Hawaiian shirt, a hat, sunglasses and has blackened skin.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | January 6, 1995
There was lots of excitement at the Walters Art Gallery the week after Christmas. Not only was it a record-setting week for visitors, but a crew from NBC Sports spent several hours in the museum's 1904 building filming a two-hour sports special. Scheduled to air Jan. 14 will be Baltimore performances by well-known figure skaters. Additional footage showing international stars Kurt Browning, Katerina Witt, Kristi Yamaguchi, Scott Hamilton, Paul Wylie, Sergei Grichoch and Katia Platov in the Renaissance Sculpture Court and the Medieval and Renaissance galleries will be used to introduce various segments of the NBC special.
NEWS
By Ann Egerton | August 19, 1991
ORDINARY MYSTERIES: More Chronicles of Life, Love and Laughter. By Stephen J. Vicchio. Wakefield Editions. 245 pages. $17.95.IN ONE of the essays in this collection, Stephen Vicchio explains what he tries to do when he writes. Whether he's writing for radio or print, he says, he tries to "tell good stories -- tales about small events and those that often overwhelm the most thoughtful of us."In "Ordinary Mysteries," Vicchio, who teaches philosophy at the College of Notre Dame, largely succeeds in telling good stories, especially when they're not about himself.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2002
HYATTSTOWN -- Drivers can't help but slow down to look at the outlandish 15-piece sculpture show along this little artist colony's only road, from the oversized relative of Mr. Potato Head waving his white-gloved hand at passers-by to the giant pink angel made of foam sitting atop a sky-high column. And that's just the point. Part public art, part traffic control strategy, The Road Show, as neighbors call it, was born out of desperation. Tired of cars speeding and oversized trucks hurtling down winding Frederick Road -- and having their pleas for relief ignored by government officials -- neighbors got together to plant the large statues in front yards.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts | October 8, 2000
MIAMI -- Maybe you've already heard about the racist potato. If not, let me fill you in. It seems that in an effort to drum up tourism, the state of Rhode Island has dotted its landscape with 6-foot statues of Mr. Potato Head wearing various guises and going by various pun-filled names. Edgar Allan Poe-tato and things of that nature. And all was well in the smallest of the United States until a woman named Onna Moniz-John caught sight of "Tourist Tater" in the local paper. He's wearing a Hawaiian shirt, a hat, sunglasses and has blackened skin.
NEWS
September 6, 2000
Visit these Web sites to find the answers, then go to www.4Kids.org / detectives / . * When was Mr. Potato Head "born"? * Which is the smallest section of the Food Pyramid Guide? * What does K. Millwood say about kids throwing curve balls? HI-TECH SPUD It's Mr. Potato Head, known and loved the world over. He's so famous and has such "a peel," who knows what he'll be up to. But now you can always "ketchup" with him on the Internet at his officially silly site at www.mrpotatohead.com / , the animated place to find the random arms and noses of the whole Potato Head family.
NEWS
By Andrew Marshall | July 26, 1998
WASHINGTON - Politics is a little dull in America at the moment, but help is at hand. J. Danforth Quayle, the former vice president, is emerging from the shadows to get his campaign for president on the road.The man who taught American students how to spell "potatoe" is back in the saddle again.Quayle has a serious chance of winning the Republican nomination for the presidency in the 2000 election. He was, after all, a congressman at 29 and a senator at 33, as well as vice president. He is a favorite of many conservatives, especially on the religious right, and he scores well in opinion polls.
FEATURES
By COOKING LIGHT | October 15, 1997
Round, dimpled, and plump in all the wrong places, Mr. Potato Head was everyone's 1960s television image of the spud. Bake him, split him open, load the fellow up with sour cream and butter and pretty soon, you too could achieve his shapely appearance.Fast-forward to 1997, the health-conscious era of potato multiculturalism. Newcomers with blue, yellow and even gold skins and a tubular kind called fingerling are headed for America's dining tables. And instead of concealing them with goop, we now celebrate their natural attributes.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | October 6, 1997
Mr. Potato Head on the back of a quarter? Or the Nike swoosh? Or the Golden Gate Bridge?These are a few of the ideas -- silly and serious -- being batted around as Congress completes a proposal to let every state put its own artwork on the reverse side of America's most used coin.Starting in 1999, George Washington and his silver pigtail would head a series of redesigned tails. Five new coins would be minted each year for nationwide use, honoring states in the order they were admitted to the union.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | December 1, 2002
Everything old is new again, at least when it comes to toys. Take a stroll through the average toy store this holiday season and you may notice a theme -- call it deja vu with a twist. Traditional playthings dominate the shelves, but these aren't your parents' toys. They have computer chips and sound effects, gizmos and doohickeys. But underneath it all, they're an awful lot like what kids played with a generation ago. "We're in a whole retro trend," says Maria Weiskott, editor-in-chief of Playthings Magazine, which covers the toy industry.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2002
HYATTSTOWN -- Drivers can't help but slow down to look at the outlandish 15-piece sculpture show along this little artist colony's only road, from the oversized relative of Mr. Potato Head waving his white-gloved hand at passers-by to the giant pink angel made of foam sitting atop a sky-high column. And that's just the point. Part public art, part traffic control strategy, The Road Show, as neighbors call it, was born out of desperation. Tired of cars speeding and oversized trucks hurtling down winding Frederick Road -- and having their pleas for relief ignored by government officials -- neighbors got together to plant the large statues in front yards.
BUSINESS
By PROVIDENCE JOURNAL-BULLETIN | December 3, 1995
Mr. Potato Head -- the first toy ever to be advertised on television -- made his big screen debut in the new Disney film, "Toy Story."The toy -- a plastic potato with removable eyes, nose and ears -- isn't the only Hasbro product to appear in the computer-animated movie.The film, about a roomful of toys that come to life, also features such Baby Boomer favorites as Battleship, Candy Land, Mousetrap, Parcheesi, Life, Scrabble and Tinkertoy."We think it's a wonderful film and we think it will increase sales of our core brands," said Hasbro spokesman Wayne Charness.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | January 6, 1995
There was lots of excitement at the Walters Art Gallery the week after Christmas. Not only was it a record-setting week for visitors, but a crew from NBC Sports spent several hours in the museum's 1904 building filming a two-hour sports special. Scheduled to air Jan. 14 will be Baltimore performances by well-known figure skaters. Additional footage showing international stars Kurt Browning, Katerina Witt, Kristi Yamaguchi, Scott Hamilton, Paul Wylie, Sergei Grichoch and Katia Platov in the Renaissance Sculpture Court and the Medieval and Renaissance galleries will be used to introduce various segments of the NBC special.
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