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NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2002
Sue Schatz of Abingdon requested a potato-chip-cookie recipe. Claramarie Trombetta of Timonium responded. She wrote that the recipe has been a favorite of her family and friends for many years, and she hoped it would be for Sue. Recipe requests Michelle Lilja of Greensburg, Pa., writes, "I'm looking for a Kahlua cake recipe. I had this cake at a party but did not get the recipe." Julie Polansky of Easthampton, Mass., writes, "I am desperately seeking a recipe known to me as Ed's Mexican Lasagna.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
Sue Sober of Baltimore was in search of the recipe for the potato chip cookies that were sold at Hutzler's department store. The last of the legendary department stores that provided goods and services to Baltimoreans for 132 years, closed over three decades ago. Many people still have fond memories of not only of the merchandise side of the store but its restaurants, tea rooms and bakeries. As luck would have it, Joyce Smith of Arbutus, who worked at Hutzler's in Westview until it closed in the late 1980s, sent in a recipe for the potato chip cookies.
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NEWS
By George F. Will | October 28, 1990
Washington.--RABBIT HAS COME to rest as he should have from heart failure at an early age, a death brought on by his undisciplined surrender to the temptation of petty indulgences. The question is, is Rabbit us?''Rabbit at Rest,'' John Updike's fourth and final novel about Harry ''Rabbit'' Angstrom, begins at a Florida airline terminal. Rabbit, 55 years old and 40 pounds overweight, is suffering intimations of his terminal illness -- chest pains -- and an irresistible craving for a candy bar. The book ends, many such surrenders later, with Rabbit hospitalized, sagging toward a death that might have been forestalled by sensible habits or serious surgery, which he rejected.
NEWS
September 2, 2014
Mary MacVean of Tribune Newspapers must be a smoker ("Are we sitting ourselves to death?" Aug. 28). Her article about sitting being as dangerous as smoking cigarettes has just given the remaining selfish smokers another fallacious argument to add to, "Why don't they make potato chips and ice cream illegal?" Now they can add, "why don't they make sitting illegal?" No one reasonable person concerned about health can accept the argument that sitting is more dangerous than smoking.
NEWS
By PAT BRODUOWSKI | January 18, 1995
Is the potato chip your family's favorite snack food? A "must see" for lovers of potato chips is "The Utz Potato Chip Trip," a self-guided tour of Utz Quality Foods, up Route 30 in Hanover, Pa.The business has grown from a few bags of potatoes fried by Bill and Sallie Utz in 1921 to today's 10,000 pounds of spuds per hour.The factory on High Street permits visitors to see how potatoes become chips from an elevated gallery. The tour includes a tape-recorded explanation of the plant.The observation gallery is open Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., although chips are not always in production Friday.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff Writer | April 5, 1995
You'll have a sweet time in the kitchen when you bake potato-chip cookies and a syrup pie.Ethel Coffey of Owensboro, Ky., requested a syrup pie recipe which she enjoyed "during World War II when sugar was rationed but we had plenty of Karo syrup. It tasted like a pecan pie without the nuts," she wrote.Julia Devine from McLean, Ky., responded. "My mother, who is now 90, gave me this recipe when I married in 1961 and I am still making her pie," she wrote.Devine's Syrup Pie Makes 2 pies5 eggs, slightly beaten1 1/2 cups syrup (dark is preferred)
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2002
George Crum, what did you start? In 1853, you got in a huff with a fussy customer in your Saratoga Springs, N.Y., restaurant, tossed some thinly cut potatoes in a pot of oil and fried them to a crisp. What emerged from the kettle were potato chips and the start of a snack- food phenomenon with annual sales of more than $6 billion. Today the snack racks in supermarkets, groceries and carryouts are lined with chips - familiar flavors such as barbecue and sour cream and onion, and increasingly new, exotic recipes such as yogurt and green onion, salsa with mesquite and herbes de Provence.
BUSINESS
By STACEY HIRSH and STACEY HIRSH,SUN REPORTER | November 23, 2005
While most other big cities put national potato chip retailer Lay's at the top of their favorite list, Baltimoreans remain loyal to their regional brand. Utz leads locally with $28 million in supermarket sales in the Baltimore-Washington area, leaving Lay's in second place with $11 million, according to a Chicago company that studies food trends. Utz, produced in Hanover, Pa., is among such local favorites as Esskay bacon and Berger Cookies. And in this region, the chip has long been able to outsell Lay's potato chips, the national brand of behemoth Frito-Lay Inc. Lay's has successfully dominated the chip market in other cities throughout the country.
FEATURES
By Kimberly J. McLarin and Kimberly J. McLarin,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 12, 1992
PHILADELPHIA -- They are the hottest thing in snack food since those annoying little raisins, these Home Boys -- cute, cool and unshakable, hanging out without causing trouble, smart but decent, well-grounded and well-dressed, gracing the front of the Chumpies Potato Chip bag with a certain urban savoir-faire.The girls know.They flood the nondescript warehouse that is home to Home Boys Distributors with phone calls: "Can I speak to Kareem? Can I speak to Eric? Can I speak to Rafael?""We get calls all day long," said president and longtime potato-chip distributor Jerry Ridgley, standing near a box full of the grape-colored bags of chips.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | May 27, 1992
Baltimore's only potato chip company has been bought by the owner of an Eastern Shore company that got its start in the mid-1980s by challenging the maker of Old Bay for its near monopoly of the steamed crab seasoning market.Mrs. Ihrie's Potato Chips Inc., an East Baltimore business born out of tragedy nearly 70 years ago, was bought by Joseph L. Bernard, owner and president of Wye River Inc. on Kent Island.Mr. Bernard, 38, declined to reveal the price other than to say, "It was in the millions of dollars."
FEATURES
May 28, 2013
Chilled Crab Dip Debbie Daugherty Richardson, past president of the Junior League of Annapolis, says this simple recipe for cold crab dip was handed down for generations within an Annapolis family before its inclusion in "Of Tide and Thyme," a cookbook published by The Junior League of Annapolis. Reprinted with permission. Makes 10-12 servings 2 finely diced hard-boiled eggs 1 pound fresh backfin crab meat 1/2 cup mayonnaise 1/2 cup chili sauce 1 teaspoon horseradish 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/8 teaspoon hot pepper sauce 1 finely grated small onion 1. Remove any shells from crab meat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Alice Fallon Yeskey | March 4, 2013
The "it" in question is Hannah's OCD, which apparently was a serious problem when she was in high school. With the first real deadline for her e-book on the horizon, she's regressing into obsessive behaviors, namely counting to eight. A lot. She counts her steps, she counts her potato chips, she counts how many times she chews her potato chips. She's teetering on completely falling apart and she looks exhausted. Luckily for her, her parents are in town for the weekend for a conference and to catch Judy Collins in concert.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Simon Habtemariam | November 10, 2011
The Sunny Gang reprise one of their new season staples - taking classic movies and try to relate their lives to it. Similar to last year's Lethal Weapon remake, the Gang drew inspiration this season from Indiana Jones. The Gang sneaks into a couple's home to retrieve some sort of an artifact by people who are unfit to hold it. Best Dennis/Dee Exchange : “I regret you getting quadruple onions on that burger,” Dennis said. “Well it's not every day I get stuck in a closet with you,” Dee snapped back.
HEALTH
Susan Reimer | July 13, 2011
Let me see if I understand. Medical researchers at Harvard University followed a couple of hundred thousand nurses for as long as 35 years and came to the remarkable conclusion that, though we all gain weight as we age, potatoes — french fries and potato chips, in particular — will cause us to gain more weight. And, in other ground-breaking news from the study, watching television also causes you to gain more weight. I am not sure where to go with this. Except to say that the real headline might be that desserts don't cause you to gain nearly as much weight as you think.
NEWS
April 9, 2011
Pringles — the little crisps that could — were sold this week by Procter & Gamble to Diamond Foods for a whopping $2.35 billion. Talk about a success story. When Pringles arrived on the snacking scene some 50 years ago, they were scorned. Pringles aspired to be called potato chips, but they did not have the right stuff to garner that title. Instead, because of their makeup — 42 per cent potato content — they had to settle for the lesser label "potato crisps. " In their early years, these crisps, made of dehydrated potato flakes that have been rolled and fried, tasted like cardboard.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | October 23, 2009
For almost a century, two homegrown companies have dominated the small Pennsylvania town of Hanover: Snyder's, famous for its pretzels, and Utz, an expert in potato chips. Sometimes the family-owned companies competed with new products, but for the most part, they co-existed - until this week. After squaring off against other snack food makers in the fight for dominance on supermarket shelves and in the cupboards of Maryland consumers, the companies have announced a plan to join forces.
NEWS
April 9, 2011
Pringles — the little crisps that could — were sold this week by Procter & Gamble to Diamond Foods for a whopping $2.35 billion. Talk about a success story. When Pringles arrived on the snacking scene some 50 years ago, they were scorned. Pringles aspired to be called potato chips, but they did not have the right stuff to garner that title. Instead, because of their makeup — 42 per cent potato content — they had to settle for the lesser label "potato crisps. " In their early years, these crisps, made of dehydrated potato flakes that have been rolled and fried, tasted like cardboard.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2001
The road from Hanover, Pa., to Baltimore is paved with potato chips -- plain and wavy, fried in cottonseed oil, lard and olestra, and dusted in three kinds of orange barbecue seasoning, Carolina, honey and red hot. Every morning before 7 a.m., a small convoy of 80 Utz Quality Foods route vans bearing the likeness of the apple-cheeked "Little Utz Girl" makes the 40-mile trek to Baltimore, delivering snacks to stores, supermarket chains and farmers' markets,...
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,Sun Reporter | November 4, 2007
Jean Norris Ihrie, who married into a Baltimore family whose name became synonymous with potato chips, died Friday of complications from hip surgery at her Clearwater Beach, Fla., residence. The Baltimore native was 89. Born Jean Norris, she was raised on Gittings Avenue in Northeast Baltimore. After graduating with honors from Seton High School in 1935, she worked as a telephone operator. The next year, she married Paul Ihrie, who was co-president of Mrs. Ihrie's Potato Chips Inc., the company founded in the early 1920s in the basement of his mother's Fulton Avenue home.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to the Sun | May 30, 2007
Glenda Blurton of Canton, Ohio, was looking for a recipe for a potato-chip cookie. She remembered that the batter contained chips. Colleeen Norris of Pennville, Ind., had a recipe for the cookies that her aunt gave her at least 30 years ago. Her recipe says either butterscotch or chocolate chips can be used. I tested the recipe using chocolate chips. The cookies were very similar to a classic Toll House chocolate-chip cookie, but the addition of the potato chips made them extra crunchy and extra good.
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