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Potassium

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By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | October 28, 2001
Q. I have been eating an energy bar with extra potassium and taking a potassium supplement along with a multi- vitamin containing potassium. About a week ago, I woke up in the night with heart palpitations. They disappeared by morning, but this event scared me. I quit taking the potassium and eating the energy bar. Can you tell me if too much potassium could have caused my heart to beat funny? A. Excess potassium can be dangerous, even lethal. Symptoms might include heart palpitations, weakness, numbness or tingling in hands, feet or lips, difficulty breathing or anxiety.
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By Lisa Airey thewinekey@aol.com | June 2, 2011
We all know that the history books are written by the victors. But in viticultural history, no one much pays attention at all. Most stories in that arena are the stuff of lore and legend anyway, so who is really paying attention to the facts? I, for one; and you, for two. Back in the mid-1800s, a root louse, indigenous to the Americas, made its way across the Atlantic to France, transported in vine stock from the New World. The American vines were immune to its predatory nature.
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NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | April 11, 2004
What is Fartlek training? Ask 10 people and you'll get 10 different definitions of Fartlek training. Derived from the Swedish words for speed and play, Fartlek is a training technique in which you vary intensity in random intervals based on how the body feels. Most often applied to running, the term has come to be loosely defined as any interval training without pre- determined, measured intervals (including manual resistance exercises like squats and push-ups). A Fartlek session might involve pinpointing a landmark ahead (like a mailbox or bend in the road)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | March 18, 2011
There is great fear in the world today about Japanese nuclear reactors exploding in a Chernobyl-level disaster. Citizens in Japan are scrambling to get ahold of potassium iodide, which can protect against radiation poisoning of the thyroid gland.  Here's the rub: Companies that supply potassium iodide are experience a shortage -- a shortage caused by orders from the west coast of the United States. You didn't misread that: The west coast of the United States.  From Business Week : Virginia-based Anbex Inc. s old out of its supply of more than 10,000 14-tablet packages on Saturday , company president Alan Morris .  "Those who don't get it are crying.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | March 19, 1991
Q: I have heard that there is a lot of sodium or salt in tap water. Is that true? How much sodium is in a glass of water? I would also like to know how potassium works in the body and what foods are high in potassium.A: The sodium content of water depends somewhat on its source. For example, well water may contain more sodium than the surface water supplying Baltimore City and Baltimore County, where the amount of sodium in tap water is quite low -- approximately 2 milligrams per cup of water.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | August 23, 1994
Q: For many years I have been treated with hydrochlorothiazide for high blood pressure. I am concerned now because a newspaper article mentioned that the use of this drug is associated with an increased risk of sudden death. Should I ask my doctor to prescribe a different medicine?A: Hydrochlorothiazide (frequently referred to as HCTZ) is one of the thiazide diuretics that is often effective in the treatment of heart failure and hypertension. The thiazides work by promoting the output of salt and water by the kidneys.
NEWS
September 16, 2007
Residents who live or work within 10 miles of the Peach Bottom nuclear power plant can acquire potassium iodide to keep at their home or business by attending either of two sessions planned by the Harford County Health Department. The sessions will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday and Oct. 6 at North Harford Middle School, 112 Pylesville Road, Pylesville. After those dates, potassium iodide may be obtained by calling 410-638-8476. Potassium iodide helps protect the thyroid gland from radioactive iodine, which might be released in the event of a radiation emergency.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun | May 2, 1999
Q. My husband takes DHEA because he thinks it keeps his skin from damaging easily. Without it, a slight bump or putting his hands in his pockets can cause bleeding abrasions.He works outdoors in the Florida sun and won't wear sunscreen. He is 54, very slim (no body fat), tanned (blond), smokes but is otherwise healthy.Since taking DHEA for a year, he has developed erectile dysfunction. When he stopped DHEA for a month, that problem disappeared, but the skin fragility returned, so he resumed DHEA.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | May 1, 2005
FIRST, A WORD from the American Heart Association about potassium: "Many people with heart failure take a diuretic, or water pill, to help their kidneys make more urine and get rid of excess fluid. This can cause potassium loss. Doctors sometimes recommend eating more potassium-rich foods [such as bananas]. ... People who have kidney problems or take certain medications may risk having potassium build up in their systems. And too much potassium can be just as harmful as too little." One other P word to note before we go on: Postum.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2004
The parents of a young girl who died last month from a medication error filed a malpractice claim yesterday against Johns Hopkins Hospital and its Home Care Group, which improperly mixed an intravenous solution that apparently caused her heart to stop. Hopkins has acknowledged "full responsibility" for the death of Brianna Cohen, who would have turned 3 next month. But her parents, Mark and Mindell Cohen, said yesterday that they were taking legal action because Hopkins had not cooperated fully and had placed "limited value" on her life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By ELLEN NIBALI AND JON TRAUNFELD | March 12, 2009
Can I transplant my dogwood while it is blooming? I planted it too close to the house two years ago, but it is flourishing. Dogwoods are forest understory trees, so choose a new location that is at least part shade. Spring is the time to transplant your dogwood, but wait until the soil is workable, i.e. dry enough that a ball of soil squeezed in your hand will crumble when you bounce it. Working with soggy soil that contains a high percentage of clay could turn it into cement. When you transplant your dogwood, prepare the transplant hole ahead of time.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | April 24, 2008
My 81-year-old mom is currently prescribed allopurinol to prevent gout, enalapril and labetalol for high blood pressure, metformin for diabetes, Plavix to thin her blood, Zocor to control cholesterol, plus extra magnesium and potassium (Klor-Con). She exhibits confusion, symptoms of dementia and dizziness, and has fallen several times. I think these medications may be excessive, and at this stage, some may even be counterproductive. Opinion? Your mother's medicines could be having an impact on her overall health.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | November 15, 2007
With flu season and the MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) staph infection upon us, we are urged to wash our hands frequently, usually "with warm, soapy water." My memories of Bacteriology 101 aren't clear, but I can't recall that warm water kills anything. Soapsuds, on the other hand, do carry nasty things away. Is there any science behind the "warm water" suggestion? You are absolutely right that warm water is no more effective than cold for removing germs. Soap and water don't kill germs, but only wash them off the surface of the skin.
NEWS
September 30, 2007
Figures protest domestic violence The Harford County Chapter of Silent Witness Initiative will display human figures, to represent people killed as a result of domestic violence, at various locations during October for Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Free-standing, wooden figures will be unveiled today at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 2515 Churchville Road, Churchville; and Deer Creek Harmony Presbyterian Church, Route 161 at Harmony Church Road, Darlington. Each figure represents a woman, man or child in the local community who was killed as the result of domestic violence.
NEWS
September 16, 2007
Residents who live or work within 10 miles of the Peach Bottom nuclear power plant can acquire potassium iodide to keep at their home or business by attending either of two sessions planned by the Harford County Health Department. The sessions will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday and Oct. 6 at North Harford Middle School, 112 Pylesville Road, Pylesville. After those dates, potassium iodide may be obtained by calling 410-638-8476. Potassium iodide helps protect the thyroid gland from radioactive iodine, which might be released in the event of a radiation emergency.
NEWS
March 3, 2006
Is there any adverse interaction between Lipitor and pomegranate juice? I know there is a problem with grapefruit juice and Lipitor and wondered whether there could be a similar problem with other tart juices. I have been reading that pomegranate juice is very beneficial, but I take Lipitor, so I thought I should check first. Grapefruit affects drug metabolism and leads to higher levels of many medicines, including Lipitor. As a result, Lipitor may be more likely to cause side effects.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | March 14, 2004
My wife and I will turn 65 in a few months. We've had an excellent insurance program that has paid for our prescriptions in the past, but will lose it. I am shocked to find that we will go from $16 per month to over $300 for our four prescriptions. We're taking Tiazac, Niaspan, Pravachol and Evista. Do you have any suggestion on where we can obtain these drugs for less expense, such as from Canada or Mexico or through the Internet? You are not alone. Millions of other Americans without drug benefits also face high drug bills.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | March 21, 2004
My wife and I will turn 65 in a few months. We've had an excellent insurance program that has paid for our prescriptions in the past, but will lose it. I am shocked to find that we will go from $16 per month to over $300 for our four prescriptions. We're taking Tiazac, Niaspan, Pravachol and Evista. Do you have any suggestion on where we can obtain these drugs for less expense, such as from Canada or Mexico or through the Internet? You are not alone. Millions of other Americans without drug benefits also face high drug bills.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | November 18, 2005
Steven Munger knows all about your sweet tooth. As a neurobiologist at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, he explores how sweeteners tickle your tongue in his search for treatments for obesity and eating disorders. One elusive goal - and a potentially lucrative one for many food scientists - is an artificial, low-calorie sweetener that really tastes like sugar. "It's the sort of thing that would be worth millions," said Manfred Kroger, a retired Penn State food science professor and flavor expert.
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