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By Los Angeles Times | January 8, 1991
Most women get the blues after giving birth, but the difference between that mild feeling of "being down" and depression is like the difference between a gentle spring rain and a flood.Experts divide postpartum disorders into three classifications: postpartum blues, postpartum depression and the more rare postpartum psychosis.The "baby blues" are usually marked by fatigue and, frequently, tears, said Dr. Lori Altshuler, a psychiatrist who teaches at UCLA Medical Center.The blues typically start from three to seven days after birth and last a few weeks, Altshuler said.
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By Arlene Karidis, For The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
A nimals have done it since the beginning of time. Women in Asia and Africa have done it for centuries. But lately, more women in Western cultures are turning to an ancient practice.  Following childbirth, they are ingesting their placenta - after it's been steamed, dehydrated and put into capsules.  These new mothers and some health practitioners say this tissue, which nourishes the baby in utero, can also nourish the mother. Limited published research suggests ingesting the placenta, or placentophagia, also helps with lactation and postpartum depression because of the hormones it contains.  The idea has gained popularity as celebrities share their experiences with placenta.
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By Holly Selby | March 27, 2008
Sleep-deprived. Feeling overwhelmed. Exhausted. Sounds like just about every new mom you've ever met. But sometimes these feelings describe more than the simple facts of life for the mother of an infant. If they persist or significantly affect a woman's quality of life, they may be symptoms of postpartum depression, says Erika Lynn Nichelson, a doctor of osteopathic medicine and obstetrician/gynecologist at Mercy Medical Center. What is postpartum depression and whom does it affect? Postpartum depression is simply depression following pregnancy.
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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Stacy Keibler plans to take a special supplement after she gives birth next month -- a pill made from her placenta. The Rosedale native and host of "Supermarket Superstar" is among a growing number of women who are returning to the ancient practice of consuming the placenta , the organ which nourishes the fetus during pregnancy. Most other mammals eat the placenta immediately after birth, as do many women in some Asian and African cultures.  Some believe that consuming the placenta can ward off postpartum depression, boost energy and speed healing, although few studies have been conducted.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 20, 2001
CHICAGO - The missing mother of week-old quadruplets was pulled from Lake Michigan by divers late Wednesday, a short distance from where police found her car. The body of Aracely Erives, 27, who was last seen by her husband Tuesday morning when she left their Southwest Side home to go for a drive in her burgundy Nissan, was positively identified by relatives about 9 p.m., police said. Erives' husband, Jesus Sandoval, told police she suffered from postpartum depression after the birth July 12 of the quadruplets, said police spokesman Robert Cargie.
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By Arlene Karidis, For The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
A nimals have done it since the beginning of time. Women in Asia and Africa have done it for centuries. But lately, more women in Western cultures are turning to an ancient practice.  Following childbirth, they are ingesting their placenta - after it's been steamed, dehydrated and put into capsules.  These new mothers and some health practitioners say this tissue, which nourishes the baby in utero, can also nourish the mother. Limited published research suggests ingesting the placenta, or placentophagia, also helps with lactation and postpartum depression because of the hormones it contains.  The idea has gained popularity as celebrities share their experiences with placenta.
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By Susan Gilbert and Susan Gilbert,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 4, 1996
No one says new mothers have it easy. Nights spent waking up every two hours and days spent trying to figure out just why the baby is crying so much leave about 80 percent of new mothers physically exhausted, emotionally drained and despondent over their seeming inability to do anything well. Call it the baby blues.Most of these women feel better after two weeks, but 10 percent have a form of clinical depression that can last for many months. Mothers with so-called postpartum depression feel so sad, anxious and helpless that they have trouble taking care of the baby and themselves.
NEWS
By Rada K. Dagher | October 9, 2013
Miriam Carey, a 34 year-old dental hygienist, created a media frenzy last week when she was shot and killed by Capitol police after ramming a White House barricade in her car while her one-year-old daughter was in the back seat. Why did she do it? What mental illness did she suffer from? Ms. Carey's mother said her daughter was diagnosed with postpartum depression after her baby was born, and months later she was hospitalized for feeling sick and depressed. Some media outlets took that to mean that postpartum depression was behind Ms. Carey's erratic behavior.
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By Carolyn Poirot and Carolyn Poirot,Knight Ridder / Tribune | July 22, 2001
Postpartum depression so severe that it could prompt a new mother to methodically drown all five of her young children, as a mother is accused of doing in Houston last month, is extraordinarily unusual. But milder forms of the mental disorder are common and easy to explain in terms of estrogen plunges, exhaustion and a demanding newborn, doctors say. When you add misplaced expectations, an immediate loss of purpose (no longer carrying a child within) and a sense of guilt about your unhappiness, postpartum blues, a mild form of postpartum depression, becomes a natural reaction that afflicts up to 80 percent of new mothers.
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By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1996
The 6 o'clock newscast wasn't half over when the panic descended. Once again, Denise Koch didn't see it coming. Although she never perspired under the TV lights, sweat now trickled down her neck. She stared at the TelePrompTer, struggling to keep the words from becoming a fuzzy jumble. The studio was spinning.Sad thoughts had brought this on, she told herself. Thoughts of delivering WJZ's news without her close friend and colleague Al Sanders, who was dying of lung cancer. And thoughts of being apart from her twin infant daughters, who had gotten out of the hospital barely a month before.
NEWS
By Rada K. Dagher | October 9, 2013
Miriam Carey, a 34 year-old dental hygienist, created a media frenzy last week when she was shot and killed by Capitol police after ramming a White House barricade in her car while her one-year-old daughter was in the back seat. Why did she do it? What mental illness did she suffer from? Ms. Carey's mother said her daughter was diagnosed with postpartum depression after her baby was born, and months later she was hospitalized for feeling sick and depressed. Some media outlets took that to mean that postpartum depression was behind Ms. Carey's erratic behavior.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2011
Dawn Cofiell was adamantly opposed to delivering her son Donovan by cesarean section three years ago, but a complication made it unavoidable. The experience was so smooth, pain-free and convenient that she surprised her doctor with requests to plan the major abdominal surgery for her next two children, Brayden and Kaitlyn. "At first I was bummed about the fact that I had to have a C-section," said the Parkville mother, who delivered her children at Greater Baltimore Medical Center in Towson.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | March 27, 2008
Sleep-deprived. Feeling overwhelmed. Exhausted. Sounds like just about every new mom you've ever met. But sometimes these feelings describe more than the simple facts of life for the mother of an infant. If they persist or significantly affect a woman's quality of life, they may be symptoms of postpartum depression, says Erika Lynn Nichelson, a doctor of osteopathic medicine and obstetrician/gynecologist at Mercy Medical Center. What is postpartum depression and whom does it affect? Postpartum depression is simply depression following pregnancy.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2008
Spiritual dance The lowdown -- The Full Circle Dance Company -- a local, ethnically diverse modern dance troupe -- presents Sacred Body: In Response to Religion, a program featuring physical representations of spirituality and personal experiences from local community members, at the Baltimore Museum of Art. A yearlong project focusing on religion, culture and faith inspired the work. Guest company Native America's People, which will demonstrate the spirituality of dance within indigenous cultures, and gospel singer Alton McClain Scarborough will also perform.
NEWS
By Ronald Kotulak and Ronald Kotulak,Chicago Tribune | December 6, 2006
Within three months after giving birth to their first baby, one out of 1,000 women suffer from schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression or some other psychotic condition severe enough for them to be hospitalized, according to a large Danish study. The findings underscore a potentially perilous period after delivery when key hormones such as estrogen and progesterone, which are elevated during pregnancy, fall precipitously, possibly triggering mental disorders in susceptible women. "This is a really important study," said Dr. Valerie Davis-Raskin, a former associate clinical professor at the University of Chicago, who treats patients with postpartum depression.
NEWS
August 9, 2006
Programs set for expectant parents Anne Arundel Medical Center is offering the following programs for expectant parents and their families about prenatal care, birthing and infant care: Clatanoff tour, for expectant mothers and their partners. A free one-hour tour of the Clatanoff Pavilion with questions and answers on delivery. "Birth Class," for expectant mothers and partners on normal labor and birth, anesthesia, birth technologies, Caesarian delivery and information on baby safety.
NEWS
October 9, 2005
Lecture to focus on mental illness The Carroll County Arts Council will hold a free "Lunch & Learn" lecture from noon to 1 p.m. Oct. 19 at the Carroll Arts Center, 91 W. Main St., Westminster. Susan Williamson, visual arts coordinator, will discuss the short story The Yellow Wallpaper, which shares its name with a painting in the exhibit, Off the Rack: Not-So-Wearable Art. The Yellow Wallpaper is a true story by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, who was afflicted with a mysterious mental illness, which in fact was postpartum depression, unknown in 1912 England.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Stacy Keibler plans to take a special supplement after she gives birth next month -- a pill made from her placenta. The Rosedale native and host of "Supermarket Superstar" is among a growing number of women who are returning to the ancient practice of consuming the placenta , the organ which nourishes the fetus during pregnancy. Most other mammals eat the placenta immediately after birth, as do many women in some Asian and African cultures.  Some believe that consuming the placenta can ward off postpartum depression, boost energy and speed healing, although few studies have been conducted.
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