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By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2012
Yes, I sent my child to day care in the outfit above -- a tie-dye onesie, car-print socks and soccer-ball legwarmers. We're behind on laundry, OK? It happens! You should have seen the other guy. Big brother was in an outfit that matched, actually, but he was also wearing a superhero cape and mask, so we got all kinds of looks at drop-off this morning. Whatever, right? We got through the day. Plus, if the kid spits up on himself, who will be able to tell? Tie-dye is the real camo!
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By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2012
Yes, I sent my child to day care in the outfit above -- a tie-dye onesie, car-print socks and soccer-ball legwarmers. We're behind on laundry, OK? It happens! You should have seen the other guy. Big brother was in an outfit that matched, actually, but he was also wearing a superhero cape and mask, so we got all kinds of looks at drop-off this morning. Whatever, right? We got through the day. Plus, if the kid spits up on himself, who will be able to tell? Tie-dye is the real camo!
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 18, 1998
Carolyn M. Roeding says she can see herself becoming "the poster child" for the motto that every vote counts.The Pasadena community activist lost a place on the Democratic ballot for the District 31 House of Delegates race by only five votes, it was officially determined yesterday.Seven Democrats ran in that election, in which the top three finishers will go on to an Election Day run-off against three Republicans. Three delegates for the district will emerge."Every vote does count, and I guess I will be the poster child for that for the next 10 years," Roeding said after the votes were finally tallied and Thomas J. Fleckenstein, a county assistant state's attorney, was declared the winner.
NEWS
April 12, 2012
I am furious beyond words at the arrogance and corruption demonstrated by the leadership of the Maryland General Assembly in failing to pass a tax bill to implement the budget for next year, all for the benefit of the gambling industry for crying out loud! ("After breakdown, what?" April 11.)The one constitutional obligation imposed on the legislature is to pass an annual budget. The leadership, particularly Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, chose to hold implementing that budget hostage in order to expand gambling in Maryland, even before the original slots parlors are fully operational.
NEWS
September 19, 1991
Olga Spessivtzeva, a Russian ballerina acclaimed as one of the finest interpreters of "Giselle," died Monday of pneumonia in Valley Cottage, N.Y. She was 96. Miss Spessivtzeva danced with the Maryinsky Ballet, now known as the Kirov, and with Sergei Diaghilev's Ballet Russes. She gave her last performance in 1937.Zino Francescatti, a violinist who was one of France's most celebrated classical musicians, died Tuesday at his home in France. Mr. Francescatti, who was 89, made his debut at the Paris Opera in 1925 and quickly became a featured soloist in European capitals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 24, 2000
She has been called "the poster child of the culture wars" by the sympathetic press and a "garbage artist" by an unsympathetic Jesse Helms. Tomorrow, performance artist Holly Hughes brings her one-woman show, "Preaching to the Perverted," to the Theatre Project for a two-weekend run. In 1990, Hughes made headlines as one of the NEA Four, four performance artists whose National Endowment for the Arts grants were denied because they did not meet the government's...
NEWS
April 12, 2012
I am furious beyond words at the arrogance and corruption demonstrated by the leadership of the Maryland General Assembly in failing to pass a tax bill to implement the budget for next year, all for the benefit of the gambling industry for crying out loud! ("After breakdown, what?" April 11.)The one constitutional obligation imposed on the legislature is to pass an annual budget. The leadership, particularly Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, chose to hold implementing that budget hostage in order to expand gambling in Maryland, even before the original slots parlors are fully operational.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | May 23, 2006
Darlene Lynn Henry, a former poster child for muscular dystrophy who fought her medical condition through 16 years of elementary school teaching, died of a nerve disease Wednesday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Lutherville resident was 38. Born in Baltimore and raised in Medfield, she was diagnosed with the muscle-wasting condition as a child. She spent summers at a muscular dystrophy camp in Leonardtown and at 21 became one of its counselors for a summer. She was the Maryland Muscular Dystrophy Association poster child for Jerry Lewis telethons for two years and answered phones in fundraising telethons.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer | September 4, 1992
A freckle-faced 5-year-old from Parkville will be named the Muscular Dystrophy Association's National Poster Child during this weekend's Jerry Lewis Labor Day Telethon -- and the boy's mother is worried.Kathy Fallon is not anxious about how her son, Lance, will react to the attention of the nationally televised event. "He takes everything in stride," she says.Rather, she is concerned about reduced contributions because of critics who claim the annual fund raising event demeans the disabled.
NEWS
June 10, 2011
When I was growing up my parents taught me to respect the policeman, fireman, my teachers, the clergy, and all of my friend's moms and dads; mainly my own. For some reason they left out politicians. In the case of Anthony Weiner, U.S. Congressman from New York, the concept of showing due respect is as lost as an asteroid wandering in the vastness of the cosmos. Having passed my sixth decade on this planet, I view my parent's command as a testimonial to their belief that certain individuals have earned our admiration, emulation, empathy, and above all of these, our trust.
NEWS
February 22, 2012
I am writing in regard to the front page stories from the Sunday edition about untimely death of Yeardley Love. In the article highlighting the facts of the case against her former boyfriend, George Huguely ("Huguely jury to begin deliberation Wednesday," Feb. 19), I was disturbed, as a former student athlete, coach and educator, to read the defense attorney's statement "he is what you get; he's a boy athlete. " I was disgusted by this all inclusive statement that was clearly made to convince the jury that Mr. Huguely's behavior was the norm in the athletic community.
NEWS
June 10, 2011
When I was growing up my parents taught me to respect the policeman, fireman, my teachers, the clergy, and all of my friend's moms and dads; mainly my own. For some reason they left out politicians. In the case of Anthony Weiner, U.S. Congressman from New York, the concept of showing due respect is as lost as an asteroid wandering in the vastness of the cosmos. Having passed my sixth decade on this planet, I view my parent's command as a testimonial to their belief that certain individuals have earned our admiration, emulation, empathy, and above all of these, our trust.
NEWS
April 24, 2011
Among the many observations made about William Donald Schaefer since his death on Monday, one of the most common has been the lament that we don't have leaders like him anymore. It's certainly true; with all due respect to our current crop of elected officials, none of them has anything close to his legacy. Maybe he was one of a kind, and maybe he was a product of circumstances that cannot (and perhaps should not) be repeated. Nonetheless, Mr. Schaefer's remarkable career offers plenty of lessons to those who aspire to leave an imprint on the state like the one he did. Here are a few tips to politicians looking for the secret of his success: Build things There aren't a lot of statues erected in honor of mayors who managed to hold the line on property taxes or successfully outsourced trash collection.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | May 23, 2006
Darlene Lynn Henry, a former poster child for muscular dystrophy who fought her medical condition through 16 years of elementary school teaching, died of a nerve disease Wednesday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Lutherville resident was 38. Born in Baltimore and raised in Medfield, she was diagnosed with the muscle-wasting condition as a child. She spent summers at a muscular dystrophy camp in Leonardtown and at 21 became one of its counselors for a summer. She was the Maryland Muscular Dystrophy Association poster child for Jerry Lewis telethons for two years and answered phones in fundraising telethons.
NEWS
By Stevenson Swanson and Stevenson Swanson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 23, 2005
SOMERS, Conn. - For about as long as Michael Ross has been alive, no New England state has carried out a death sentence. Both Ross' life and that long hiatus in executions could end Wednesday, when the convicted serial killer is scheduled to die in Connecticut's death chamber. If all goes according to plan, it will be the first execution in the six New England states in 45 years. In a region generally seen as more socially liberal than such strongholds of capital punishment as Texas and Virginia, the case has become the focus of intense interest, in part because Ross, 45, has said he wants to die. Although death penalty opponents maintain that he could probably delay his execution for at least five years with various appeals, Ross has instructed his lawyer to drop all challenges to the sentence and to oppose others, including Ross' father, who have sought to intervene on his behalf.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 24, 2000
She has been called "the poster child of the culture wars" by the sympathetic press and a "garbage artist" by an unsympathetic Jesse Helms. Tomorrow, performance artist Holly Hughes brings her one-woman show, "Preaching to the Perverted," to the Theatre Project for a two-weekend run. In 1990, Hughes made headlines as one of the NEA Four, four performance artists whose National Endowment for the Arts grants were denied because they did not meet the government's...
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | August 18, 1995
Boston -- The answering machine in her Dallas home now offers the world only the simplest of telephone messages. ''There will be no press statement,'' it says, ''there will be no more public appearances from me. I am going to be regular person Norma McCorvey.''Last week, the 47-year-old, who once described herself as ''a poor, half-crazy, half-ordinary woman who'd been picked by fate to become a symbol of something much bigger and finer than herself,'' went through one of the most public of conversions.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | December 21, 1997
CHRISTMAS CAME early for Republican Ellen Sauerbrey. Splendidly wrapped packages have been put under her tree, gifts that she can use to great advantage during the New Year.And the funniest thing is that these gifts come from some of her most die-hard Democratic foes.Ethics messFirst to arrive was a glorious wall-length poster, fit for framing, of state Sen. Larry Young. He looks almost angelic standing before reporters and photographers proclaiming his innocence of allegations that he mixed personal business with his public role as an elected official.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 18, 1998
Carolyn M. Roeding says she can see herself becoming "the poster child" for the motto that every vote counts.The Pasadena community activist lost a place on the Democratic ballot for the District 31 House of Delegates race by only five votes, it was officially determined yesterday.Seven Democrats ran in that election, in which the top three finishers will go on to an Election Day run-off against three Republicans. Three delegates for the district will emerge."Every vote does count, and I guess I will be the poster child for that for the next 10 years," Roeding said after the votes were finally tallied and Thomas J. Fleckenstein, a county assistant state's attorney, was declared the winner.
NEWS
March 18, 1998
REGARDING ETHICS, Thomas W. Redmond Sr. seems to have problems doing the right thing. The Anne Arundel County Ethics Commission ruled last week that the county councilman correctly abstained from voting on a measure affecting his towing business, but improperly participated in work sessions that produced the bill.Mr. Redmond earned more than $32,000 in county fees through an exclusive contract towing cars for the Police Department in parts of Pasadena.In assessing Mr. Redmond's role in the legislation, which affected the bonding of towing companies, "his actions constituted an attempt to influence legislation in which he had a direct interest," the commission concluded.
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