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By HANAH CHO and HANAH CHO,SUN REPORTER | January 2, 2006
Get those 2-cent stamps ready. Starting Sunday, the price of a U.S. Postal Service first-class stamp will rise to 39 cents, the first rate increase since June 2002. The move is part of an across-the-board increase, averaging 5 percent, that will affect the cost of almost all domestic mail delivery and services. It includes bulk, priority and express mail, and delivery confirmation, return receipt and certified mail services. International rates will go up about 6 percent. Unlike previous increases associated with rising operating costs, revenue from the domestic price jump will go toward a $3.1 billion escrow account as required by law, according to the Postal Service.
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NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1998
The U.S. Postal Service says everyone should have free mail delivery, and in Union Bridge, that could mean erecting mailboxes along a stretch of Main Street.Town officials, however, contend that mailboxes along the street would be impractical, dangerous and unattractive.The prospect of mailboxes crowding narrow sidewalks and postal vehicles causing traffic detours has the Town Council considering an ordinance to bar mailboxes on Main Street."It would be almost impossible to have mailboxes on Main Street," said Mayor Perry L. Jones Jr. "It's not a question of whether [residents]
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times Knight-Ridder News Service contributed to this article | January 5, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Postal Rate Commission agreed yesterday to raise the cost of mailing a first-class letter to 29 cents, a 4-cent increase, clearing the way for higher rates to go into effect next month.The independent commission pared a penny off a 30-cent rate that the U.S. Postal Service had requested last March. It also authorized use of a 27-cent stamp on most envelopes provided by utilities, department stores, insurance companies and similar firms for paying bills.The rate for postcards, now 15 cents, is scheduled to rise to 19 cents -- also a penny lower than the Postal Service had requested.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2012
Updated with comments from Harris and Bartlett. In a rare intra-delegation, across-the-aisle nudge, Sen.Barbara A. Mikulskion Tuesday called on the state's two Republican lawmakers in Washington to support a Senate version of an overhaul of theU.S. Postal Servicethat would save a pair of mail sorting facilities that just happen to be located in the lawmakers' districts. The move instantly put Republican Reps. Andy Harris and Roscoe Bartlett on defense, forcing them to either support the bipartisan Senate version of the postal legislation -- which is not popular with Republican House leaders -- or acknowledge that the Postal Service must be allowed to trim costs and close plants, even if the cuts are made in their own districts.
FEATURES
By Michael Precker and Michael Precker,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | July 1, 1999
If you need to pack up your hippopotamus, the U.S. government is here to help. Don't forget, says Uncle Sam, soothing hippo music and a 1-pound sedative.The U.S. Postal Service Web site at www.usps.com includes a section of earnest, useful hints on packing and moving various items you might have around the house.But right there between Glasses and Teacups ("Put a layer of peanuts or newsprint on the bottom of the box") and Kids' Stuff ("Have your kids seal the boxes and write their names or put their favorite stickers on each box")
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | August 31, 1999
A U.S. Postal Service police officer, who led city officers on a brief chase into Anne Arundel County yesterday, was arrested and charged with holding up an auto parts store in Baltimore.Postal Officer Leonard William Bryant, 31, was charged with armed robbery, using a handgun in the commission of a felony, conspiracy to commit robbery, and first-degree assault.A Postal Service spokeswoman said disciplinary action is pending.The holdup occurred shortly after 8 a.m., when two men armed with guns walked into an Advance Auto Parts store in the 2100 block of Patapsco Ave. and threatened a cashier, said Agent Angelique Cook-Hayes, a city police spokeswoman.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | August 31, 1999
A U.S. Postal Service police officer who led city officers on a brief chase into Anne Arundel County yesterday was arrested and charged with holding up an auto parts store in Baltimore.Postal Officer Leonard William Bryant, 31, was charged with armed robbery, using a handgun in the commission of a felony, conspiracy to commit robbery and first-degree assault.A Postal Service spokeswoman said disciplinary action is pending.The holdup occurred shortly after 8 a.m., when two men with guns walked into an Advance Auto Parts store in the 2100 block of Patapsco Ave. and threatened a cashier, said Agent Angelique Cook-Hayes, a city police spokeswoman.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1998
After 10 years, a tiny post office in Lutherville -- a friendly gathering spot for scores of residents -- has closed, leaving its customers without a nearby branch.All because of a mailbox.Lucy Smith, an independent contractor who operated the satellite branch at Ridgely Road and Kurtz Avenue for the U.S. Postal Service, wanted to have a regulation blue box on the property moved closer to her office for safety reasons.But M. L. Jain, owner of the professional building where the post office was located, refused.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2010
Federal postal investigators say that when mail employee Andrew Walsh saw a greeting card, he saw an opportunity. The 51-year-old night-shift supervisor at the U.S. Postal Service processing and distribution center in Baltimore has been charged with theft of mail after Walsh was seen during covert surveillance opening greeting cards at a conveyor belt, according to authorities. A search of his vehicle recovered about 450 gift cards. Federal prosecutors said the investigation was launched after officials received reports that more than 1,200 greeting cards were rifled through over the past three months.
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