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Liz F. Kay | October 19, 2011
It's going to be more expensive to mail holiday greetings and birthday cards next year. But the U.S. Postal Service announced Tuesday that the price of a first-class stamp will increase to 45 cents starting on January 22, the first price increase in two years, according to Reuters. Prices for postcards will increase three pennies to 32 cents and letters to Canada and Mexico will increase to 85 cents. Sending a greeting to someone outside of North America increases to $1.05.
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NEWS
By Kym Byrnes and For The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Exploding cannon fire lit the sky and reflected off the water as rain poured down on American soldiers struggling to defend Fort McHenry against a British attack. It was September 1814, and after the Battle of Baltimore, Francis Scott Key penned the work that became our national anthem, "The Star-Spangled Banner. " The goal of Annapolis-based artist Greg Harlin has been bringing that scene to life - on a postage stamp. This past weekend, as Baltimore celebrated the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Baltimore, the U.S. Postal Service unveiled Harlin's creation: the War of 1812: Fort McHenry Forever stamp.
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NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | liz.kay@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 8, 2010
Mail carriers will attempt to resume deliveries today, according to the U.S. Postal Service. Deliveries were canceled throughout Maryland on Saturday due to the snowy weather, said Postal Service spokewoman Freda Sauter. On Monday, "carriers will make every attempt to deliver as long as there's safe conditions," she said. Residents are asked to clear a path to their mailboxes to ensure it is visible and safe to access. Mail will not be delivered if carriers deem conditions to be unsafe, according to the postal service.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
Veteran mailman Jeffrey L. Shipley turned his apartment into a repository of pilfered postage, authorities say, as he took letters, magazines, Netflix videos and even a Mother's Day card from the homes on his route. Shipley, who worked at a Postal Service facility in Catonsville, "failed to deliver, embezzled and stole over 20,000 pieces of mail," according to federal charges filed against him last week. He faces one count each of mail theft and delaying the mail. Neither Shipley nor his attorney could be reached for comment.
NEWS
December 15, 2011
Ever since Congress stupidly decided to make the U.S. Postal Service a quasi-private entity, the organization has been going steadily downhill. The arrangement has grossly inflated the ranks of upper and mid-level management, people who have nothing to do with the post office's actual mission of delivering the mail. On top of that, some upper management idiots decided to spend millions of dollars on changing the design of the Postal Service's logo and are now engaged in a massive TV advertising campaign to get people to ship more packages by USPS.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 4, 2010
A foreign student I knew in college said he loved America for three reasons: our freedoms, the quality of our peanut butter and the excellence of our postal service. He thought it was cool that we could gather and protest anything we wanted to, whenever we wanted to. He thought the famous brands of peanut butter on the supermarket shelves were all good. And he was absolutely amazed that he could mail a letter from Connecticut on a Monday and have it reach almost anywhere in the country by Wednesday or Thursday at the latest.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2010
WASHINGTON - The Postal Service took the first formal step Wednesday toward cutting mail delivery to five days a week. The postal governing board agreed to ask the independent Postal Regulatory Commission for an opinion on dropping Saturday delivery. That request goes to the commission next week. Under the proposal, mail delivery to homes and businesses and mail collection from blue mailboxes would be limited to Monday through Friday. However, post offices that are now open on Saturdays would remain open, and Express Mail delivery service would still be available seven days a week.
NEWS
By Fredric Rolando | August 10, 2011
Few institutions touch more Americans than the U.S. Postal Service, whose role is spelled out in the Constitution and which delivers to 150 million homes and businesses six days a week. Letter carriers get to know our communities, occasionally saving elderly residents who are ill, finding lost children and stopping crime. We annually conduct the nation's largest single-day food drive, replenishing food pantries in Baltimore and elsewhere. And yet, the misinformation circulating about the Postal Service is startling, such as the notion that in delivering the mail, the USPS has a massive imbalance between revenues and expenses.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2013
Word that the cash-strapped Postal Service would stop delivering mail on Saturdays hit Lakesha Johnson hard. "I think that's terrible," the Baltimore woman said Wednesday outside the city's Main Post Office on East Fayette Street. "When they want to save money, it's always us who suffer. " But Don Seto said it wouldn't make much difference to him. "I pay bills online, I use email," said Seto, a biology professor who also uses the Internet to discuss research with colleagues, during a visit to the downtown Annapolis branch.
NEWS
December 9, 2011
Isn't it ironic that our government could afford to subsidize our involvement in Iraq to the tune of $12 billion per month, yet it cannot afford to subsidize the U.S. Postal Service, one of the best-operating federal agencies, at a fraction of that cost ("'Snail mail' could get slower under Postal Service plan," Dec. 6)? Donald T. Torres, Ellicott City
NEWS
By Cassandra Jones Havard | March 13, 2014
If you are among America's 68 million people who can't, won't or just don't do business with private banks, the post office wants you. Recognizing a need for affordable banking services among the nation's lower-income consumers, the U.S. Postal Service also sees a way to bolster its own bottom line by offering financial services. We'll get back to the post office in a minute. But first, who are these consumers who require a new model of financial services? The first, the so-called unbanked, are those who prefer to deal in cash and who don't use traditional, regulated banks for a myriad of reasons, including an inability or unwillingness to pay high fees or a poor credit history that precludes access to loans.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Federal employment is expected to drop sharply in the span of a decade, government projections show, as budget cuts and retirements begin to reshape the workforce. While U.S. employment will likely grow nearly 11 percent from 2012 through 2022, federal jobs will shrink by about 14 percent to 2.4 million workers, according to estimates released by the Department of Labor in December. The federal workforce stands to lose 407,000 jobs and see the largest percentage decrease of any service-providing industry.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2013
Charles Leonard Fitzpatrick, a retired postal administrator and Navy veteran who survived an emergency landing in a storm off the Aleutian Islands during World War II, died of heart disease July 7 at his Catonsville home. He was 92. Born in Baltimore and raised on Chelsea Terrace in Walbrook, he was the son of Edwin Abell Fitzpatrick, a Baltimore Sun editor, and Sally Emma Bolander, a homemaker. He was a graduate of Forest Park High School. Mr. Fitzpatrick joined the Navy during World War II and was assigned to an aviation education program.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2013
The inspector general of the U.S. Postal Service is urging the agency to take a cue from the port of Baltimore and expand its partnerships with private businesses to cut costs and modernize its infrastructure. In a report released last month, Inspector General David C. Williams recommended that the Postal Service adopt a cohesive strategy for forging more public-private partnerships with businesses as a way of bringing needed cash into the system, which posted a $15.9 billion loss in 2012.
EXPLORE
June 26, 2013
Taken from the pages of The Aegis dated June 27, 1963: The U.S. Postal Service this week assigned a "ZIP code" number to each of its thousands of branch offices. The new system, which the agency hoped would become as commonplace as car tags or Social Security numbers, was designed to speed up mail delivery. The system would allow for presorting and the future installation of mechanical equipment in post offices. These new machines were to be capable of detecting numbers, but not names, by a system of light rays.
NEWS
By Theresa Sintetos, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2013
The U.S. Postal Service issued an illustration of a bank swallow by Maryland artist Matt Frey Friday as a stamped envelope, the second in a four-part series of swallows by Frey commissioned by the organization. The bird is the smallest swallow in North America, and adorns the seventh stamped envelope issued by the Post Office this year. A Baltimore native, Frey graduated from Syracuse University's College of Visual and Performing Arts with a degree in illustration in 1996. He has done illustrations for Discover Magazine, National Geographic Magazine and the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum, among others.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | December 27, 2012
Once as much of a test of a civilian government's effectiveness as collecting the garbage and keeping the peace in the streets, the delivery of packages and letters via a government postal service has undergone tremendous changes since the days when Benjamin Franklin got the unenviable task of being the nation's first postmaster general. In the United States, it became evident nearly a century ago that there was money to be made by delivering packages more quickly and reliably than the U.S. Postal Service.
NEWS
By Kristina Costa | March 13, 2012
The only way to reach Supai, Ariz. (population 208), is to hike or helicopter eight miles to the bottom of the Grand Canyon. TheU.S. Postal Servicedelivers mail and supplies there three days a week - by mule. Although the country's steepest canyon may be no match for the American mail carrier, our postal system does face a gaping threat from a huge hole of another kind: After several years of modest surpluses, the postal service lost $25.4 billion between 2007 and 2011, plunging $13 billion into debt.
NEWS
By John Culleton | February 19, 2013
In Korea, back in the 1950s, a new commander arrived for the small military installation in Ulsan where I was stationed. One of his first acts was to issue a general order which read, "No stupid action will be taken by any member of this command. " As a mere major, he had no authority to issue general orders, but that's beside the point. We need a similar rule for the U.S. Congress with respect to the U.S. Postal Service. If you check the Constitution, you will find that Article I, Section 8, Clause 7 says that Congress has the power "To establish Post Offices and Post Roads.
EXPLORE
By Doug Miller | February 12, 2013
The U.S. Postal Service last week announced it will stop delivering mail on Saturdays in an effort to curtail losses it has seen in recent years. The changes, set to begin Aug. 5, should save the agency $2 billion annually at a time when the Postal Service lost $15.9 billion in the last fiscal year, according to a statement by Postmaster General Patrick R. Donahoe posted on the agency's website. Congress has stunted attempts to change the delivery process in the past, and this time lawmakers in Washington confronted this decision with opposition as soon as it was announced.
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