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NEWS
September 18, 1992
It was bound to happen. As soon as Postmaster General Marvin Runyon announced a sweeping cut of 42,000 postal supervisors, the union representing supervisors rushed to Congress threatening court action. Even worse, members of Congress took up the union's cause.Postal prices cannot be stabilized unless the Postal Service's gigantic bureaucracy is sharply reduced. Wages and benefits account for over 80 cents of every dollar spent. The postal empire of 600,000 employees is just too big and cumbersome.
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NEWS
By Kym Byrnes and For The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Exploding cannon fire lit the sky and reflected off the water as rain poured down on American soldiers struggling to defend Fort McHenry against a British attack. It was September 1814, and after the Battle of Baltimore, Francis Scott Key penned the work that became our national anthem, "The Star-Spangled Banner. " The goal of Annapolis-based artist Greg Harlin has been bringing that scene to life - on a postage stamp. This past weekend, as Baltimore celebrated the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Baltimore, the U.S. Postal Service unveiled Harlin's creation: the War of 1812: Fort McHenry Forever stamp.
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NEWS
August 16, 1991
Once again, the U.S. Postal Service finds itself in a fiscal bind not of its own making. It is running a $1.6 billion deficit due to the manipulations of Congress and an ill-advised decision by the commission that sets postal rates.Postmaster General Anthony M. Frank wanted to bring the agency's $48 billion budget into balance through a 30-cent rate for first-class mail and lesser increases for other categories. But he was rebuffed by the independent Postal Rate Commission, which devised its own plan -- 29 cents for first-class and a whopping 25 percent hike in third-class bulk mail.
NEWS
Staff Reports, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2014
A 57-year-old Glen Burnie man pleaded guilty Tuesday to theft of thousands of aluminum carts from the U.S. Postal Service that will cost more than $2.8 million to replace, according to the U.S. State's Attorney's Office. Officials allege Roland Michael Muir and another man stole about 2,030 containers and sold them to metal recyclers for more than $323,000. Prosecutors said Muir worked for a private mailer company in Baltimore driving a box truck, and from July 2010 to 2014 he drove the truck to two U.S. Postal Service bulk mail centers in Capitol Heights where he took the large containers and loaded them on the truck.
NEWS
February 14, 1992
There's something about donating food that makes it an enormously effective form of charity. Perhaps it speaks to a basic human need to share one's larder, or perhaps it's simply easier than other forms of giving. Whatever the reason, this week's Postal Service campaign for area food banks is a stunning success.In just two days, area residents left 375,000 pounds of canned, boxed, bottled and plastic wrapped foodstuffs near their mailboxes. Neighborhood letter carriers, the critical link in this chain of caring, are hauling donations back to their post offices where they are boxed and trucked to the Maryland Food Bank.
NEWS
January 29, 1991
Even the postmaster general is laughing at the ludicrous decision by the Postal Rate Commission to impose a new first-class postage rate on Feb. 3 of 29 cents, instead of the requested 30 cents. It is bad enough that postal costs rise so quickly that prices must be hiked every few years. But to settle on the odd-ball figure of 29 cents simply creates a new irritant for the American consumer.Why 29 cents? As Postmaster General Anthony M. Frank noted, all it will do is prove a boon for the copper mines, since billions of pennies will be needed to provide change when customers purchase their stamps.
NEWS
April 20, 1994
What's going on here? Why is the largest group of business postal users linking arms with the postmaster general in support of a 3-cent increase in first-class mail? Why would businesses that stand to see their postal costs rise 10 or 15 percent cheer the decision to approve this higher rate?And why is the postmaster patting himself on the back for this 32-cent proposal?Because the situation could be a lot worse. The requested increase (it still must be adopted by the independent Postal Rate Commission)
NEWS
February 6, 1992
Anthony Frank soon will leave his job as postmaster general after having brought the world's largest company, kicking and screaming, into the era of automation. He did his job well, but the United States Postal Service remains mired in excessive red tape and too many customer complaints. Everyone, it seems, has a grudge against the post office.Yet given the assignment, Mr. Frank and his army of 750,000 workers do amazingly well. Every day, they must sort and deliver 525 million letters to 118 million mail boxes.
NEWS
October 11, 1991
All post offices, stations and branches of the U.S. Postal Service in Anne Arundel County will be closed Monday in honor of the Columbus Day holiday.Delivery services will be limited to Express Mail andspecial delivery at offices having receipt of mail.Customers may buy stamps from the following vending units, which are open 24 hours a day:* Glen Burnie Post Office7596 RitchieHighway21061-9998 (no insurance available)* BWI TerminalBaltimore-Washington International Airport21240-9998* Annapolis Mall21401-3098Monday to Saturday 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.Sunday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
NEWS
May 27, 1992
During his four years as chairman of the Tennessee Valley Authority, Marvin T. Runyon Jr. earned the nickname "Carvin' Marvin" for hacking away at the federally owned electric utility's vast bureaucracy. By the time he was finished, 14,000 of TVA's 35,000 workers had been discharged. Now that the 70-year-old Mr. Runyon has been named postmaster general, does the same fate await the U.S. Postal Service?Mr. Runyon may not be the postal hatchet man that some fear. For one thing, the groundwork has already been laid for a gradual downsizing of the huge postal bureaucracy (work force: 750,000)
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
Veteran mailman Jeffrey L. Shipley turned his apartment into a repository of pilfered postage, authorities say, as he took letters, magazines, Netflix videos and even a Mother's Day card from the homes on his route. Shipley, who worked at a Postal Service facility in Catonsville, "failed to deliver, embezzled and stole over 20,000 pieces of mail," according to federal charges filed against him last week. He faces one count each of mail theft and delaying the mail. Neither Shipley nor his attorney could be reached for comment.
NEWS
By Cassandra Jones Havard | March 13, 2014
If you are among America's 68 million people who can't, won't or just don't do business with private banks, the post office wants you. Recognizing a need for affordable banking services among the nation's lower-income consumers, the U.S. Postal Service also sees a way to bolster its own bottom line by offering financial services. We'll get back to the post office in a minute. But first, who are these consumers who require a new model of financial services? The first, the so-called unbanked, are those who prefer to deal in cash and who don't use traditional, regulated banks for a myriad of reasons, including an inability or unwillingness to pay high fees or a poor credit history that precludes access to loans.
BUSINESS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
— Members of Maryland's congressional delegation, saying constituents have complained of lengthy mail delays, pressed the U.S. Postal Service on Friday to resume regular delivery — even as the agency reported it was not aware of any significant problems. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski wrote to Postmaster General Patrick R. Donahoe that her office has received complaints from residents in Pasadena, Windsor Mill and Perry Hall who say they have not received a delivery in more than a week and have faced extraordinarily long lines at post offices.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
David L. Reid Jr., a retired postal worker, died Dec. 29 of a heart attack at his Northeast Baltimore home. He was 70. David Lee Reid Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised near Gwynns Falls Parkway. He was a 1961 graduate of City College and attended Howard University. He later served in the Navy. Mr. Reid worked for 43 years as a mail processing clerk at Baltimore's main post office on Fayette Street. He retired in 2011. A lifelong movie buff, Mr. Reid also collected films, family members said.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2013
Charles Leonard Fitzpatrick, a retired postal administrator and Navy veteran who survived an emergency landing in a storm off the Aleutian Islands during World War II, died of heart disease July 7 at his Catonsville home. He was 92. Born in Baltimore and raised on Chelsea Terrace in Walbrook, he was the son of Edwin Abell Fitzpatrick, a Baltimore Sun editor, and Sally Emma Bolander, a homemaker. He was a graduate of Forest Park High School. Mr. Fitzpatrick joined the Navy during World War II and was assigned to an aviation education program.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2013
The inspector general of the U.S. Postal Service is urging the agency to take a cue from the port of Baltimore and expand its partnerships with private businesses to cut costs and modernize its infrastructure. In a report released last month, Inspector General David C. Williams recommended that the Postal Service adopt a cohesive strategy for forging more public-private partnerships with businesses as a way of bringing needed cash into the system, which posted a $15.9 billion loss in 2012.
NEWS
November 15, 1994
No one should be shocked by the General Accounting Office's conclusion, in a two-volume study, that the U.S. Postal Service -- the largest federal civilian agency -- is crippled by a "dysfunctional organizational culture" and an "us versus them" mindset.Tough discipline, not cooperation, is how bosses rule workers.None of this is new. Postmaster General Marvin Runyon told The Sun's Roger Simon in June of this year, "We need to empower employees. We've been too authoritarian, where a supervisor goes in and says, 'This is the way I want it done and check your brains at the door.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2013
A postal worker was killed while delivering mail when his vehicle and a pick-up truck crashed in the 3100 block of Monkton Road, Baltimore County police said. The worker was identified as Bruce Robert Deutser, 62, of the 17400 block of Bushland Road in Parkton. Officers arrived at the collision, near the St. James Academy in Monkton, just after 11:30 a.m. Saturday. Deutser was pronounced dead at the scene, police said. Police said Deutser was slowing down to make a left turn when a black Dodge pick-up truck driven by a 53-year-old man from Delaware tried to pass him on the left side.
EXPLORE
June 26, 2013
Taken from the pages of The Aegis dated June 27, 1963: The U.S. Postal Service this week assigned a "ZIP code" number to each of its thousands of branch offices. The new system, which the agency hoped would become as commonplace as car tags or Social Security numbers, was designed to speed up mail delivery. The system would allow for presorting and the future installation of mechanical equipment in post offices. These new machines were to be capable of detecting numbers, but not names, by a system of light rays.
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