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Postage Stamp

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NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1998
Carroll County has one of highest rates of breast cancer in Maryland -- 33.25 deaths per 100,000 women, according to the most recent statistics from the county Health Department.Only Baltimore City and Anne Arundel County have higher rates -- 33.39 and 33.38, respectively.But a historic stamp might help improve such statistics.Members of the county Health Department's Women's Wellness Program gathered at the new Westminster post office yesterday to celebrate the release of the Postal Service's breast cancer postage stamp.
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NEWS
By Kym Byrnes and For The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Exploding cannon fire lit the sky and reflected off the water as rain poured down on American soldiers struggling to defend Fort McHenry against a British attack. It was September 1814, and after the Battle of Baltimore, Francis Scott Key penned the work that became our national anthem, "The Star-Spangled Banner. " The goal of Annapolis-based artist Greg Harlin has been bringing that scene to life - on a postage stamp. This past weekend, as Baltimore celebrated the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Baltimore, the U.S. Postal Service unveiled Harlin's creation: the War of 1812: Fort McHenry Forever stamp.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Lisa Pollak and Lisa Pollak,Sun Staff | April 30, 2000
April 30, 2000 Dear Pfc. David R. Augustus: xxYou probably never expected your name to end up on a postage stamp. But in a way, it makes sense. Thirty-one years after you died in Vietnam, letters are the closest we can get to you. I have to go out on a patrol for five days with four men. I'll be all right, so pray for me, and I'll be home safe and sound. In the letters you are real. More real than in the friendly voice of the daughter who never knew you. More real than in the anonymous sea of white headstones at Baltimore National Cemetery.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank Barnako and Frank Barnako,CBS MarketWatch | September 16, 2004
Stamps.com has made some changes since introducing its service that lets you put Mom's picture on a real U.S. postage stamp. Unless Mom is Mae West, or Imelda Marcos, or Bonnie Parker. The company added restrictions after The Smoking Gun Web site, co-owned by Time Warner and Liberty Media, decided to test the boundaries. "TSG sought to determine what kind of interesting stamps we could actually create," its editors said. They tried to get stamps processed featuring Lee Harvey Oswald, the Unabomber and Salvatore "Sammy the Bull" Gravano.
SPORTS
By Thomas Bonk and Thomas Bonk,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 14, 2004
TROON, Scotland -- Almost since John Highet, a local doctor, and James Dickie, a builder from Glasgow, came up with the idea of creating a small golf course in 1878 on the Ayrshire shore, the Postage Stamp -- the infamous, 123-yard eighth hole at Royal Troon -- has been delivering beatings to golfers. The best in the world will try again at Royal Troon when the British Open begins tomorrow. Royal Troon is where Arnold Palmer won his second straight British Open in 1962, though he never had better than a par-3 at the eighth.
FEATURES
By Judith Forman and Judith Forman,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1998
A historic new postage stamp making its debut today in the nation's capital has a familiar return address: the Maryland Institute, College of Art.The first issue of the U.S. Postal Service's Breast Cancer Postage Stamp will be celebrated today in a White House ceremony with first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and Postmaster General William Henderson serving as hosts. Also on hand will be the stamp's designer, Ethel Kessler, and its illustrator, Whitney Sherman, both 1971 graduates of the institute.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank Barnako and Frank Barnako,CBS MarketWatch | September 16, 2004
Stamps.com has made some changes since introducing its service that lets you put Mom's picture on a real U.S. postage stamp. Unless Mom is Mae West, or Imelda Marcos, or Bonnie Parker. The company added restrictions after The Smoking Gun Web site, co-owned by Time Warner and Liberty Media, decided to test the boundaries. "TSG sought to determine what kind of interesting stamps we could actually create," its editors said. They tried to get stamps processed featuring Lee Harvey Oswald, the Unabomber and Salvatore "Sammy the Bull" Gravano.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Staff Writer | March 15, 1992
The call of the wild is proving irresistible to card makers.Pro Bass cards have been a hit with fans of pro bass fishermen for a couple of seasons.Now there are federal duck stamp cards.Duck stamp collecting is an increasingly popular part of stamp collecting. Many collectors concentrate on ducks, ignoring postage stamps. Popularity has increased demand, and the desire of some collectors for stamps that haven't been signed and taken on hunting trips has helped drive up prices.The catalog value of a complete mint set of federal duck stamps (1934-91)
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1999
Saints and postage stamp figures have this much in common: Both must be deceased.No chance, then, that American painter Jackson Pollock would have shown up at the U.S. Postal Service ceremony in Georgia on Thursday unveiling the 1940s installment of the "Celebrate the Century" stamp series, in which Pollock appears on a stamp commemorating Abstract Expressionism. It wouldn't have been his kind of party, anyway. No beer, no bourbon, no smoking.Pollock drank and smoked a lot. He smoked so much that you have to flip through many photographs of him before you find one in which he's not smoking.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | December 8, 1994
HAPPY BIRTHDAY, James Thurber. The great New Yorker writer-cartoonist was born 100 years ago today.Some journalists, and especially at the Sunpapers, are a little miffed that Thurber gets a postage stamp (with a self sketch) for his centennial. For H. L. Mencken's 100th birthday back in 1980, the Postal Service turned down a bid for a Mencken stamp.Thurber and Mencken have a few things in common. Both started writing for newspapers and then became nationally famous writing for magazines. Both were humorists in essence.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2004
TAKING VANITY to new heights, the world can now slap its image on everything from a postage stamp to a credit card, transforming the "look at me" mentality from figurative to literal in one giant, narcissistic leap. This month, the U.S. Postal Service gave the go-ahead for a Los Angeles technology company to test customized postage made from people's pictures. A Nebraska bank, also this month, introduced a credit card with a photograph of the customer as its main image - meant more for the sake of individuality than security.
SPORTS
By Thomas Bonk and Thomas Bonk,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 14, 2004
TROON, Scotland -- Almost since John Highet, a local doctor, and James Dickie, a builder from Glasgow, came up with the idea of creating a small golf course in 1878 on the Ayrshire shore, the Postage Stamp -- the infamous, 123-yard eighth hole at Royal Troon -- has been delivering beatings to golfers. The best in the world will try again at Royal Troon when the British Open begins tomorrow. Royal Troon is where Arnold Palmer won his second straight British Open in 1962, though he never had better than a par-3 at the eighth.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2002
When Peggy Davison first began singing in elementary school, she never dreamed she someday would be on a postage stamp - not even after making it big as one of the most successful girl groups of the early 1960s. But Aug. 22, Davison, who lives in Carroll County, and the other members of the Angels - the group best known for "My Boyfriend's Back," a No. 1 song in 1963 - will be at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland when a series of stamps honoring famous girl groups will be unveiled.
NEWS
October 25, 2001
This editorial appeared in the Providence Journal Friday: TWO POSTAGE stamps in the "cultural holiday" series have just been issued, and both honor the two most important Islamic festivals, Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha. The stamps, now on sale at post offices around America, feature gold Arabic calligraphy on a blue background and the words "Eid Greetings." Eid al-Fitr breaks the fast that ends Ramadan, the Islamic holy month. Eid al-Adha commemorates Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son, and comes at the end of the hajj, the annual period of pilgrimage to Mecca, the Muslim holy city.
NEWS
November 16, 2000
TRAPPED BETWEEN the past and the future. That's where the U.S. Postal Service finds itself. It delivers the mail the old-fashioned way, even as futuristic message-delivery competitors steal its business. First-class postage rates are going up once again -- by a penny. Come January, it will cost 34 cents, not 33 cents, to mail a letter to Aunt Lizzy in San Diego. The rate for mailing periodicals will rise nearly 10 percent. Yet this $2.5 billion revenue increase may only hold off the next price rise for a couple of years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lisa Pollak and Lisa Pollak,Sun Staff | April 30, 2000
April 30, 2000 Dear Pfc. David R. Augustus: xxYou probably never expected your name to end up on a postage stamp. But in a way, it makes sense. Thirty-one years after you died in Vietnam, letters are the closest we can get to you. I have to go out on a patrol for five days with four men. I'll be all right, so pray for me, and I'll be home safe and sound. In the letters you are real. More real than in the friendly voice of the daughter who never knew you. More real than in the anonymous sea of white headstones at Baltimore National Cemetery.
NEWS
By Kym Byrnes and For The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Exploding cannon fire lit the sky and reflected off the water as rain poured down on American soldiers struggling to defend Fort McHenry against a British attack. It was September 1814, and after the Battle of Baltimore, Francis Scott Key penned the work that became our national anthem, "The Star-Spangled Banner. " The goal of Annapolis-based artist Greg Harlin has been bringing that scene to life - on a postage stamp. This past weekend, as Baltimore celebrated the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Baltimore, the U.S. Postal Service unveiled Harlin's creation: the War of 1812: Fort McHenry Forever stamp.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2002
When Peggy Davison first began singing in elementary school, she never dreamed she someday would be on a postage stamp - not even after making it big as one of the most successful girl groups of the early 1960s. But Aug. 22, Davison, who lives in Carroll County, and the other members of the Angels - the group best known for "My Boyfriend's Back," a No. 1 song in 1963 - will be at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland when a series of stamps honoring famous girl groups will be unveiled.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1999
Imagine squeezing the family van into one of those "compact car" spaces in parking garages -- the kind so narrow you are forced to wiggle out of your vehicle sideways.Now imagine hurtling toward this space at 50 mph.And one more thing: The parking space is moving.That, in effect, is the challenge before Roger Lehnert today at the Jack B. Poage Air Show in Westminster, where he will attempt to land his yellow Piper J-3 Cub on the back of a speeding pickup truck.The truck's 8-by-20-foot steel landing pad provides little room for error -- 6 inches in the front and back.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1999
Saints and postage stamp figures have this much in common: Both must be deceased.No chance, then, that American painter Jackson Pollock would have shown up at the U.S. Postal Service ceremony in Georgia on Thursday unveiling the 1940s installment of the "Celebrate the Century" stamp series, in which Pollock appears on a stamp commemorating Abstract Expressionism. It wouldn't have been his kind of party, anyway. No beer, no bourbon, no smoking.Pollock drank and smoked a lot. He smoked so much that you have to flip through many photographs of him before you find one in which he's not smoking.
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