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NEWS
October 1, 2011
One of the major problems facing the U.S. Postal Service is that fewer people are using first class mail. If all of the 14 million people who belong to brother and sister unions to the postal workers union stopped using the Internet to receive and pay bills, do their banking and send electronic messages, and only used the USPS for their transactions, the post office would certainly be in better financial shape. Perhaps it would even solve most of their financial problems. Unfortunately, union members only show their solidarity by showing up at protest demonstrations.
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NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | May 1, 2014
The U.S. Postal Service has signed a lease that will keep the post office in downtown Columbia in its current spot for five more years, a USPS spokeswoman said Thursday. The post office is on the ground floor of the American City Building, which overlooks Lake Kittamaqundi. The USPS announced in November 2013 that the future of the post office was in doubt after its current lease, which expired in December, was up.  Shortly thereafter, USPS and the building owner Howard Hughes Corp.
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NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | May 1, 2014
The U.S. Postal Service has signed a lease that will keep the post office in downtown Columbia in its current spot for five more years, a USPS spokeswoman said Thursday. The post office is on the ground floor of the American City Building, which overlooks Lake Kittamaqundi. The USPS announced in November 2013 that the future of the post office was in doubt after its current lease, which expired in December, was up.  Shortly thereafter, USPS and the building owner Howard Hughes Corp.
NEWS
April 16, 2014
An article in the April 18, 1914 edition of The Argus reported the need for more help at the post office. In spite of the increase in the volume of mail coming to the Catonsville postoffice, including the load of parcels post packages, the Postoffice Department has not increased its carrier force for several years. The force of seven men are accomplishing the almost impossible. To attempt a regular schedule of delivery on certain days is quite out of the question. It simply can't be done- hence the delay in the delivery of The Argus to many subscribers last Saturday on account of the heavy Easter mail.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
Top state officials will decide Wednesday whether to buy the Annapolis post office on Church Circle to use it for government offices. The Board of Public Works -- comprised of the governor, comptroller and treasurer -- will vote on spending $3.2 million to buy the building. Appraisals for the building at 1 Church Circle range from a low of $950,000 to a high of $3.55 million, according to the state. The property is less than one acre and the building is 13,058 square feet.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2011
Edward Tarter, stopping in at the Harford Road post office in Baltimore, was aghast to hear Wednesday that it might shut down. He understands that the U.S. Postal Service — which is eyeing one in 10 of its locations nationwide for possible closure — is hurting financially. He knows that people are increasingly doing online the business they used to conduct by mail. "But still, you need face to face every once in a while," said Tarter, 64, who lives in nearby Morgan Park. "If they close this down, it's going to do irreparable damage to this community.
NEWS
February 15, 2013
Recent news coverage of the U.S. Postal Service's proposal to end Saturday mail deliveries has focused mainly on the public's reaction to the change ("For mail carriers, Saturday routes roll on - for now," Feb. 10). What has scarcely been mentioned, however, is the elephant in the room: The main reason the Post Office is in trouble is not a decline in first-class mail but two laws passed by Congress. The first was the 1971 Postal Reorganization Act signed by Richard Nixon. This required that the Post Office be run as independent agency that makes a profit from its services.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2013
The small grassy hill and handful of hedges around the United States post office in Waverly aren't much to look at. But federal prosecutors allege that for branch manager Richard L. Wright III, the grounds were a cash cow. Authorities filed criminal complaints against Wright, 46, of Essex, and Kimberly Parnell, 43, the manager of the Pikesville post office branch, accusing them of collectively taking tens of thousands of dollars in kickbacks from...
NEWS
April 16, 2014
An article in the April 18, 1914 edition of The Argus reported the need for more help at the post office. In spite of the increase in the volume of mail coming to the Catonsville postoffice, including the load of parcels post packages, the Postoffice Department has not increased its carrier force for several years. The force of seven men are accomplishing the almost impossible. To attempt a regular schedule of delivery on certain days is quite out of the question. It simply can't be done- hence the delay in the delivery of The Argus to many subscribers last Saturday on account of the heavy Easter mail.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
Maryland officials agreed Wednesday to buy the historic Annapolis post office building from the U.S. Postal Service for use as part of the government complex surrounding the State House. Without dissent, the three-member Board of Public Works agreed to pay $3.2 million for the 13,000-square-foot building on Church Circle. Built in 1901, the structure is listed on the Maryland Historical Trust inventory of historic properties. Under the deal, the state will lease space back to the Postal Service to continue services for eight to 20 months until it relocates.
NEWS
March 14, 2014
I don't know if it was poor reporting by The Sun or poor accounting by Baltimore County School Superintendent Dallas Dance, but in an article about technology in schools you recently wrote that Mr. Dance would "pay for the computers in part by evaluating whether central office employees who leave the school system should be replaced" ( "Baltimore County school board OKs $205 million technology contract," March 11). I'm not a bookkeeper, but I can't recall when the act of evaluating ever helped pay for anything.
NEWS
By Cassandra Jones Havard | March 13, 2014
If you are among America's 68 million people who can't, won't or just don't do business with private banks, the post office wants you. Recognizing a need for affordable banking services among the nation's lower-income consumers, the U.S. Postal Service also sees a way to bolster its own bottom line by offering financial services. We'll get back to the post office in a minute. But first, who are these consumers who require a new model of financial services? The first, the so-called unbanked, are those who prefer to deal in cash and who don't use traditional, regulated banks for a myriad of reasons, including an inability or unwillingness to pay high fees or a poor credit history that precludes access to loans.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
David L. Reid Jr., a retired postal worker, died Dec. 29 of a heart attack at his Northeast Baltimore home. He was 70. David Lee Reid Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised near Gwynns Falls Parkway. He was a 1961 graduate of City College and attended Howard University. He later served in the Navy. Mr. Reid worked for 43 years as a mail processing clerk at Baltimore's main post office on Fayette Street. He retired in 2011. A lifelong movie buff, Mr. Reid also collected films, family members said.
NEWS
November 23, 2013
Whether you are a devoted soccer mom taking your child to practice or a game, an anxious job-seeker looking for a place to park, a business executive running late for a meeting, a big rig trucker delivering fresh produce, or student heading to class or a tourist trying to find a museum or other local attraction, you, your vehicle and your trip are essential to the economy. What is more significant, whoever you are and wherever you are going, is that you are a person and much too important to be lumped into the demeaning and dehumanizing category of "traffic.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | November 22, 2013
Howard County police and the U.S. Postal Inspection Service are advising residents to take precaution after a number of thefts of outgoing checks from home mailboxes were reported. There have been approximately 40 cases of theft from mailboxes since the beginning of the year in Howard County, police said Friday. In recent months, police said they have seen a slight increase.  In each case, a suspect looks for mailboxes with red flags up, indicating there is outgoing mail to be picked up. The suspect steals checks from the outgoing mail, alters the payee's information and then cashes the victim's checks, police said.  The incidents have been reported in areas throughout the county.
FEATURES
By Abigail Green, For The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
You could brave an indoor play place or children's museum with your baby, paying a hefty admission fee and hoping your tot won't get trampled by big kids. Or you could visit the Baltimore County Public Library's Storyville in Woodlawn or at the Rosedale branch. The colorful, interactive, and free play area is designed specifically for children ages 0-5. Babies can play safely in a gated-off area while older siblings play dress-up, read books, or explore Storyville's general store, post office, and puppet theater.
NEWS
By Brent Jones, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2010
Workers at the city's main post office on Fayette Street were prepping Thursday morning for the annual late-night Tax Day rush, albeit a more casual version than that of a decade ago. On April 15 back then, the hours leading up to midnight took on a carnival-like feel. "Years ago, when there was only mailing, we'd have IRS people in the lobby helping people fill out forms," said William Ridenour, postmaster of Baltimore. "We'd have people coming in with a box of receipts doing their tax forms at 11 at night.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | December 13, 2012
The U.S Postal Service is offering a $25,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of a man involved in an armed robbery at the small Benson Post Office between Bel Air and Fallston Wednesday afternoon. The robbery at the post office, in the 100 block of Connolly Road, was reported at 1:46 p.m., Sheriff's Office spokesman Eddie Hopkins said. According to a follow up news release from Hopkins issued Thursday, witnesses told police a white male entered the post office and posed as a customer.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2013
The small grassy hill and handful of hedges around the United States post office in Waverly aren't much to look at. But federal prosecutors allege that for branch manager Richard L. Wright III, the grounds were a cash cow. Authorities filed criminal complaints against Wright, 46, of Essex, and Kimberly Parnell, 43, the manager of the Pikesville post office branch, accusing them of collectively taking tens of thousands of dollars in kickbacks from...
NEWS
October 5, 2013
The Benson Post Office was robbed Saturday morning by a man who fired at a Good Samaritan as he followed the robber getting away, according to Maryland State Police. At about 9:41 a.m., troopers from the Bel Air Barrack of the Maryland State Police responded to the Benson Post Office at 108 Connolly Road for a report of an armed robbery. , Benson, Harford County, Maryland for an armed robbery. The suspect displayed a weapon to the cashier. After he fled the post office, a Good Samaritan chased the suspect.
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