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Positioning System

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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2001
SPRINGFIELD, Va. - Leon Begeman scurries through the underbrush of a wooded suburban park here one recent Saturday morning, in hot pursuit of hidden treasure. "Three hundred seventy feet to go!" he announces to the small band of treasure hunters tagging along behind. Begeman carries no yellowed map, has no X-marks-the-spot to find the booty. His only guide is a handheld Global Positioning System receiver, which can pinpoint his location anywhere on Earth, and this geographic clue: N 38M-0 45.031 W 077M-0 12.916.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2012
Albert C. Reymann, a retired Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory mechanical engineer who led a team that helped create the forerunner of the global navigation and positioning systems in use today, died Monday of heart disease at Gilchrist Center Howard County. The longtime Catonsville resident was 85. Born in Baltimore and raised on Homestead Street near Clifton Park, he was the son of Hildebert Reymann, a Revere Copper and Brass supervisor, and Helen Reymann, a homemaker. He attended St. Bernard School and was a 1944 Polytechnic Institute graduate.
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NEWS
By Richard Irwin | September 11, 2007
Police Blotter is a sampling of crimes from police reports in Baltimore and Baltimore County. Baltimore Central Robbery -- A man, 43, was getting out of his mother's Ford Escort in the 200 block of Robert St. about midnight Sunday when he was knocked down by a man who robbed him of his wallet containing $200. The assailant took the vehicle's keys and drove off with a woman. The vehicle has tags LLL 179. Southwestern Shooting -- An unidentified man was shot in the buttocks about 6 p.m. yesterday while in the 1900 block of N. Ellamont St., and was treated at Maryland Shock Trauma Center.
NEWS
By RICHARD IRWN | August 8, 2008
Police Blotter is a sampling of crimes from police reports in Baltimore and Baltimore County. Baltimore Northeastern Shooting : Police continue to seek two men who robbed a man in a carryout in the 2700 block of Harford Road early Wednesday, shooting the victim in the left knee. The victim, 44, was waiting for food when a man placed a gun to his head and robbed him. Police said that after a second man shoved the victim against a wall, the gunman shot him. The victim was treated at Johns Hopkins Hospital.
NEWS
August 22, 2004
AACC instructors' art on display at bookstore Artwork from 10 instructors in Anne Arundel Community College's lifelong learning courses are featured in An Artists' Gathering, an art exhibit on display through Aug. 31 at Barnes & Noble Booksellers in Annapolis. This year's exhibit includes oil paintings, watercolors, drawings and prints. Artists are Don Clement, T.J. Monzo, Wanda C. Paxton and Susan H. Strok, all of Annapolis; Rheta Carter Clugston of Arnold; Steven T. Fischer of Crofton; Alice C. Yeager of Edgewater; C.J. Loeschke of Glen Burnie; Diane Tuckman of Lanham; and Martha A. Griffin of Seaford, Del. AACC offers courses in studio arts, crafts, photography, music and theater.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | August 7, 2006
They came from France in 1831 and have been silent for four years. But when the bells at the Basilica of the Assumption begin chiming over Charles Street again in November, they will have a deeper and more resonant sound. They also will be equipped with the latest in satellite technology. The basilica's main bell - a 3,500-pound behemoth considered one of the largest of its time - has been upgraded with a larger hammer and will be connected to a Global Positioning System satellite to ensure that it chimes in unison with the church clock, regardless of power failures.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2000
As mild weather continued to melt remnants of recent snowstorms, county officials tried yesterday to dissolve lingering public anger about what they admit was a subpar plowing job. The message: We're sorry, and we'll do better next time. "To those county residents who feel you did not receive the level of service you thought you should, I offer my apology with a sincere pledge that our efforts will continue to give you quality service in the future," Public Works Director John M. Brusnighan wrote in an open letter to Anne Arundel County residents.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Craig Crossman and Craig Crossman,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 11, 2003
You'd think that in this day and age of computers and modern electronic gadgetry they would come up with a way to keep track of and locate your kids, wherever they might be. After all, they've got LoJack to recover stolen cars, right? Well, there is, and it's from a company named Wherify Wireless. Looking much like one of those stylish watches youngsters wear, the GPS Locator for Kids converges the satellite Global Positioning System (GPS) locator and digital wireless PCS cell phone technology along with Wherify's location system (www.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1997
The stereotype is that men won't ask directions when they're lost. Instead, with a death grip on the steering wheel and their breath coming in tiny, agitated bursts Yi! Yi! Yi! like an asthmatic Chihuahua, they'll barrel down unfamiliar roads for hours before finally pulling into a gas station somewhere in, say, New Hampshire and asking: "How far's Disney World, partner? Couple miles down the road?" Men say this is a vicious canard. Women say: Just drive with one of these dopes.The good news is that for anyone who is phobic about asking directions, Acura automobiles now offer a state-of-the-art, in-dash navigation system.
NEWS
September 1, 1997
NELSON SCHABDACH kissed his wife and headed toward work early on Aug. 23. But he never arrived at his job at John D. Lucas Printing Co. in Dundalk.Instead, he was critically injured in a 6: 30 a.m., one-car accident when his vehicle ran off the road at the busy interchange of Interstate 695 east and Interstate 95 north. His car was hidden from a search party of relatives by the dense shrubs and trees that fill the highway's island.Nearly 30 hours later, Schabdach's family found him lying unconscious in a stream that runs through the grassy area also hidden from the heavy traffic a few feet away.
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | April 10, 2008
Most GPS devices tell you where you are and how to get where you're going. But there are other uses for global positioning technology - such as keeping track of other people and safeguarding your possessions. Consider the gadget I've been testing for the past few days. It is a bit smaller than a paperback book, and if you hide it in the trunk of your car - or someone else's - you can log onto a Web site and call up a map showing exactly where your car is. Or where it has been, and how fast it was going at the time.
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | September 6, 2007
In my family, we still get a chuckle when someone mentions our first experience with a GPS navigation system, 10 years ago this month. The "system" consisted of a plastic blob containing a GPS receiver that sat on the dashboard, attached by cable to a laptop computer loaded with mapping software. With my wife holding the PC in her lap and my kids and mother in the back seat, we set off on a 10-mile drive to a friend's house -- which normally takes about 15 minutes. In the interest of science, we agreed to follow the system's directions explicitly, wherever they might lead.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | August 7, 2006
They came from France in 1831 and have been silent for four years. But when the bells at the Basilica of the Assumption begin chiming over Charles Street again in November, they will have a deeper and more resonant sound. They also will be equipped with the latest in satellite technology. The basilica's main bell - a 3,500-pound behemoth considered one of the largest of its time - has been upgraded with a larger hammer and will be connected to a Global Positioning System satellite to ensure that it chimes in unison with the church clock, regardless of power failures.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2004
The Howard County school system is one step closer to hiring an ombudsman to field complaints and questions from parents, students and teachers. The school board voted 4-1 last week to approve a preliminary job description with the hope of advertising the position by the middle of next month and having someone in place by Jan. 1. Board member Sandra H. French opposed the position during a lengthy and lively discussion, saying that she and fellow board...
NEWS
August 22, 2004
AACC instructors' art on display at bookstore Artwork from 10 instructors in Anne Arundel Community College's lifelong learning courses are featured in An Artists' Gathering, an art exhibit on display through Aug. 31 at Barnes & Noble Booksellers in Annapolis. This year's exhibit includes oil paintings, watercolors, drawings and prints. Artists are Don Clement, T.J. Monzo, Wanda C. Paxton and Susan H. Strok, all of Annapolis; Rheta Carter Clugston of Arnold; Steven T. Fischer of Crofton; Alice C. Yeager of Edgewater; C.J. Loeschke of Glen Burnie; Diane Tuckman of Lanham; and Martha A. Griffin of Seaford, Del. AACC offers courses in studio arts, crafts, photography, music and theater.
SPORTS
By Doug Beizer and Doug Beizer,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 12, 2003
Massive 65-foot yachts with twin staterooms and hardwood floors may draw the biggest oohs and aahs at this year's boat shows, but for an increasing number, it's all about the smaller stuff. While the temporary piers in Annapolis will be packed with boats, the nearby tents will have all the latest in electronics, such as handheld global positioning system (GPS) devices and full-color, electronic chart plotters. "There are a lot of gadgets and electronics involved in boating. I think that's one of the reasons people love their boats so much," said Rick Franke, a spokesman for the boat shows.
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | September 6, 2007
In my family, we still get a chuckle when someone mentions our first experience with a GPS navigation system, 10 years ago this month. The "system" consisted of a plastic blob containing a GPS receiver that sat on the dashboard, attached by cable to a laptop computer loaded with mapping software. With my wife holding the PC in her lap and my kids and mother in the back seat, we set off on a 10-mile drive to a friend's house -- which normally takes about 15 minutes. In the interest of science, we agreed to follow the system's directions explicitly, wherever they might lead.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Craig Crossman and Craig Crossman,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 11, 2003
You'd think that in this day and age of computers and modern electronic gadgetry they would come up with a way to keep track of and locate your kids, wherever they might be. After all, they've got LoJack to recover stolen cars, right? Well, there is, and it's from a company named Wherify Wireless. Looking much like one of those stylish watches youngsters wear, the GPS Locator for Kids converges the satellite Global Positioning System (GPS) locator and digital wireless PCS cell phone technology along with Wherify's location system (www.
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