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By Michael Kilian and Michael Kilian,Chicago Tribune | February 16, 1992
The interest in World War II has occasioned not only television documentaries and a deja vu look in fashion, but also a retrospective appreciation of World War II-era art.This period of global conflagration seems more synonymous with the destruction and repression of art than its cultivation, but the painted image was as much a part of those dark days as any other form of culture -- as the Museum of Modern Art's recent and splendid retrospective "Art of...
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By Dave Rosenthal | October 12, 2012
The National Portrait Gallery's new exhibition, “Poetic Likeness: Modern American Poets,” uses portraiture, biography and verse to explore the people who created a distinctive, American voice. Walt Whitman's free verse in "Leaves of Grass," (1855), was a shocking departure from literary tradition, the museum notes -- both for its form and for the inclusion of topics that described ordinary life. (That mirrors the equally shocking mid-century shift to realism by painters such as Courbet in France.)
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By Lisa Troshinsky and Lisa Troshinsky,Special to The Sun | August 3, 2008
The National Portrait Gallery in downtown Washington has definitely changed since its reopening in 2006. The formerly staid cultural fixture has moved into the 21st century with exhibits such as Recognize! Hip Hop and Contemporary Portraiture, which explores the world of hip-hop. The multimedia display is a far cry from the gallery's permanent portrait collection of U.S. presidents and military figures. This exhibit includes images of LL Cool J and Ice T; videos with urban themes; an installation that combines sculpture with poetry; and colorful graffiti, a pillar of hip-hop along with DJs, emcees and break dancing.
NEWS
By Lisa Troshinsky and Lisa Troshinsky,Special to The Sun | August 3, 2008
The National Portrait Gallery in downtown Washington has definitely changed since its reopening in 2006. The formerly staid cultural fixture has moved into the 21st century with exhibits such as Recognize! Hip Hop and Contemporary Portraiture, which explores the world of hip-hop. The multimedia display is a far cry from the gallery's permanent portrait collection of U.S. presidents and military figures. This exhibit includes images of LL Cool J and Ice T; videos with urban themes; an installation that combines sculpture with poetry; and colorful graffiti, a pillar of hip-hop along with DJs, emcees and break dancing.
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By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | January 1, 1997
Later, he became a mad visionary bent on murder and slave insurrection. Later still, he became a martyr idealized in song and bronze. But in 1847, John Brown was a failing wool merchant in Springfield, Mass.A daguerreotype from those days, recently purchased and now on display at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, shows a thin, clean-shaven, intense man with a piercing stare. It is the oldest known image of Brown, whose 1859 raid at Harper's Ferry demonstrated the passions of pre-Civil War America.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | June 2, 1998
"He was the most influential critic we have had in this country in terms of his promotion of the arts and liberating them from censorship." That's H. L. Mencken, the sage of Baltimore, as described by John Daniel Reaves, who will play the great journalist four times this coming week at Washington's National Portrait Gallery.Reaves will give his one-man play, called "H.L. Mencken, One More Time," in conjunction with the portrait gallery's exhibition "Celebrity Caricatures in America."It's a collection of more than 200 caricatures of such people as Babe Ruth, Elsa Maxwell, George Gershwin, Al Smith and the Marx Brothers, by such people as Miguel Covarrubias, Marius de Zayas, Alfred Frueh, James Montgomery Flagg and Will Cotton.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | March 3, 1996
William Burroughs, Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, Gregory Corso and Lawrence Ferlinghetti. All writers. Willem de Kooning, Jackson Pollock, Philip Guston, Mark Rothko and Barnett Newman. All painters. Followers of two very different creative callings. But they had much in common.They burst on the scene after World War II. They were outsiders. They banded together in groups against the establishment of their day. What they created, from deep within, challenged a world that had never seen anything like it before.
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By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | June 25, 2006
For years, the National Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian American Art Museum seemed destined to live in the shadow of Washington's better known museums. People may have been vaguely aware that Gilbert Stuart's depiction of George Washington hung at the Portrait Gallery (and most left it at that), while the paintings and sculptures at the American Art Museum rarely attracted the attention enjoyed by their flashier counterparts at the National Gallery of Art, the Phillips Collection or the Corcoran Gallery of Art. PORTRAIT GALLERY AND THE SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM / / 8th and F streets, N.W., in Washington / / reopen to the public July 1 / / 202-633-1000
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By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 11, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The early 20th century produced some of the most creative and daring artists and writers of our age. As social revolutionaries, American avant-garde artists and intellectuals shook the foundations of modern society with artwork that was viewed as immoral, lifestyles that were considered deviant and viewpoints that were looked upon as un-American, if not seditious.Today, one of the most comprehensive looks at these members of the avant garde is on display here in an extensive exhibit at the Smithsonian Institution National Portrait Gallery (through Oct. "Group Portrait: First American Avant Garde," focuses on four leading personalities of the period and their respective circles of peers, through 105 paintings, drawings, sculptures, photographs and rare literary publications.
TRAVEL
By Mercury News | August 5, 2007
How can I find out about tours of Washington, D.C., that are conducted in Spanish? We couldn't find operators or companies that provide regularly scheduled Spanish-speaking group tours of Washington. However, WashingTours and Events (wash ingtours.net), which is owned and operated by Maricar Donato, offers private tours of the city in Spanish and several other languages. She handles primarily large groups but can also accommodate small parties. Donato charges $65 an hour, regardless of the size of the group, but you must provide the car, and her tours are a minimum of four hours.
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By Mercury News | August 5, 2007
How can I find out about tours of Washington, D.C., that are conducted in Spanish? We couldn't find operators or companies that provide regularly scheduled Spanish-speaking group tours of Washington. However, WashingTours and Events (wash ingtours.net), which is owned and operated by Maricar Donato, offers private tours of the city in Spanish and several other languages. She handles primarily large groups but can also accommodate small parties. Donato charges $65 an hour, regardless of the size of the group, but you must provide the car, and her tours are a minimum of four hours.
NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | June 25, 2006
For years, the National Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian American Art Museum seemed destined to live in the shadow of Washington's better known museums. People may have been vaguely aware that Gilbert Stuart's depiction of George Washington hung at the Portrait Gallery (and most left it at that), while the paintings and sculptures at the American Art Museum rarely attracted the attention enjoyed by their flashier counterparts at the National Gallery of Art, the Phillips Collection or the Corcoran Gallery of Art. PORTRAIT GALLERY AND THE SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM / / 8th and F streets, N.W., in Washington / / reopen to the public July 1 / / 202-633-1000
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | February 13, 2005
African American Leaders of Maryland: A Portrait Gallery By Suzanne E. Chapelle and Glenn O. Phillips. Maryland Historical Society. 155 pages. $20 softbound Here, in Maryland's fourth century, whom would you single out as its most illustrious African-American? Judging from the cover of their new book (released during Black History Month), authors Suzanne E. Chapelle and Glenn O. Phillips believe that person is none other than statesman and abolitionist Frederick Douglass (1818-1895). Compiling their portrait gallery of Maryland's most fascinating individuals of African descent, the authors limited the total to 45 and excluded anyone still alive in 2000 or whose likeness does not exist.
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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2000
In the Great Hall of the National Portrait Gallery, in the golden light of the waning day, Charlie Herbek speaks the words of the poet Walt Whitman, the wound-dresser of the Civil War. "Here is a case of a soldier I found among the crowded cots in the Patent Office. He likes to have someone to talk to. And we will listen to him. He got badly hit at Fredericksburg that eventful Saturday, 13th of December. He lay the succeeding two days and nights helpless on the field Our soldier is from Pennsylvania.
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By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Ann Shumard knocks you over with her enthusiasm. There's always one more tidbit to add, another slip of information to get hold of and catalog."
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By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Ernest Hemingway never saw himself the way Miguel Covarrubias, the brilliant caricaturist, saw him: a vulnerable Tarzan rubbing hair-growth elixir on his chest. Hemingway's image as the he-man of American letters was nothing to joke about."I don't think he would have found [the painting] particularly funny. He would not have laughed," says Frederick Voss, curator of the Hemingway exhibit now on display at the Smithsonian Institution's National Portrait Gallery. "One thing you can say for certain is that he did not have a sense of humor about himself."
NEWS
January 3, 1991
Giovanni Michelucci, 99, who was considered the father of modern Italian architecture, died Monday of cardiac arrest in Rome. Mr. Michelucci came to fame in 1933 when the Italian dictator Benito Mussolini chose his "rationalist" design for the Florence train station. The architect was still working shortly before his death. His design was chosen for the renovation of Florence's Uffizi Gallery.Edmond Jabes, 78, the Egyptian-born Jewish writer known for his meditations on exile and Judaism, died of heart failure Dec. 26 in Paris.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | February 26, 1995
When he was an old man, in the late 19th century, Frederick Douglass was asked what younger African-Americans should do about racism. "Agitate! Agitate! Agitate!" he replied.That must be the best three-word autobiography ever written, for it is the story of his life. And the life of this Maryland-born slave, who became a great voice for freedom, remains as inspirational today as it is significant."He was without question the most important African-American leader and personality of the 19th century," writes historian Waldo E. Martin Jr. in the book that accompanies "Majestic in His Wrath," a lively, well-organized, instructive exhibit at + Washington's National Portrait Gallery.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 1, 1998
LONDON -- There is a place where athletes remain forever young, where greatness is captured in the glimmer of an eye or the bulge of a muscle, and where Britain still rules the sporting world.Come to Britain's National Portrait Gallery and take a walk through an exhibition devoted to this country's sporting heroes.It doesn't matter if you don't know the names of these stars, or the sports they played. The race for fame and excellence is a universal pursuit, the foreign fields, racetracks and boxing rings merely backdrops to glory.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | June 2, 1998
"He was the most influential critic we have had in this country in terms of his promotion of the arts and liberating them from censorship." That's H. L. Mencken, the sage of Baltimore, as described by John Daniel Reaves, who will play the great journalist four times this coming week at Washington's National Portrait Gallery.Reaves will give his one-man play, called "H.L. Mencken, One More Time," in conjunction with the portrait gallery's exhibition "Celebrity Caricatures in America."It's a collection of more than 200 caricatures of such people as Babe Ruth, Elsa Maxwell, George Gershwin, Al Smith and the Marx Brothers, by such people as Miguel Covarrubias, Marius de Zayas, Alfred Frueh, James Montgomery Flagg and Will Cotton.
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