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By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
In the courtroom where Baltimore Circuit Judge Timothy J. Doory metes out justice, he has a steadfast if silent companion, Maj. German H.H. Emory, a lawyer killed in World War I whose portrait hangs to the right of his bench. "He's looking at me every day," Doory said, "so we have a relationship. " But it wasn't until this summer that, by accident of jury duty, Emory's relations would come face to face with his portrait. The mix of happenstance and history so delighted Doory that he hosted a gathering in his courtroom Friday to toast Emory on the 95th anniversary of his battlefield death.
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TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
Perhaps it was a prank or a desire for an unique Ocean City souvenir, but either way, a portrait of the founder of the Dunes Manor Hotel that hung in the lobby is missing and the hotel wants it back. Police said the hotel reported the theft of the painting depicting Dunes Manor founder Thelma Conner early Sunday morning. The picture went missing sometime during the night, around 3 a.m., when a hotel security guard noticed it was gone. Conner, who founded the Victorian-style hotel in 1987 at the age of 74, is a beloved figure in Ocean City . She was known for her Texas twang and her tea-time tradition.
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NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | December 24, 2006
A couple of years ago, Vernise Bolden took her son, Cameron, to get his portrait taken. After getting him dressed and trying to make him smile, Bolden ended up buying photos she didn't like "because we went through all that trouble." She knew she didn't want to do that again. But last week, Bolden threw caution to the wind and trekked to the Columbia JC Penney portrait studio. Four-year-old Cameron squirmed, and 2-month-old Jaelyn cried. Their dad, Wallace, behaved. "We know this is our last child," Vernise said, "and I wanted a nice family photo."
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | March 14, 2014
For proof that kids love pizza, have a look at Everett Stimler's "Folk Art House. " A 5th grader at Lisbon Elementary School, Stimler made this painting by applying acrylic paint to the lid of a pizza box. And several other students in a new art exhibit likewise made paintings on pizza boxes. These pizza-box-as-canvas paintings amount to just a few slices of the hundreds of pieces of art in various mediums that fill a gallery at the Howard County Arts Council for an exhibit titled "Alternative Processes — Alternative Materials.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
Perhaps it was a prank or a desire for an unique Ocean City souvenir, but either way, a portrait of the founder of the Dunes Manor Hotel that hung in the lobby is missing and the hotel wants it back. Police said the hotel reported the theft of the painting depicting Dunes Manor founder Thelma Conner early Sunday morning. The picture went missing sometime during the night, around 3 a.m., when a hotel security guard noticed it was gone. Conner, who founded the Victorian-style hotel in 1987 at the age of 74, is a beloved figure in Ocean City . She was known for her Texas twang and her tea-time tradition.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | February 13, 1993
Parents and children, children and parents . . . the course of life inexorably reshapes this never-simple relationship, whose only constants are change -- and persistent attention from thoughtful artists."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2010
The rosy-cheeked girl in the Peter Pan-collared pink dress and patent-leather Mary Jane shoes sits frozen in time, captured on canvas by a Baltimore County artist about four decades ago. But the identity of the little girl is a mystery, which the owner of the portrait now wants to unlock. Brooke Lynch hopes to return the painting to the girl, who sat in a Lutherville studio as his mother, artist Georgianna Sinclair Lynch, worked on her likeness. The odyssey of the portrait began when a parent contacted Lynch to commission a painting sometime around 1970.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | April 14, 1995
After being buried in the state archives for 15 years, the portrait of former Maryland Gov. Spiro T. Agnew returned yesterday to the State House he disgraced more than two decades ago.In an event that was more news conference than ceremony, Gov. Parris N. Glendening explained his controversial decision to restore the portrait to its chronological spot among those of Maryland's other 20th-century governors in the State House reception room.The purpose, Mr. Glendening said, was not so much to honor a former governor, "but to bring reason and a sense of history to this room."
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | November 1, 1990
''Henry, the Portrait of a Serial Killer'' is said to be loosely based on the life of Henry Lee Lucas, who has been sentenced to death for several killings. He brags of more killings, some 150.John McNaughton did the film, one that was released without a rating after the MPAA mentioned something about giving it an NC-17.''Henry'' is well made, but why was it made? Who needs it? The film ranks down there with movies like ''In Cold Blood'' and ''Murder One,'' re-enactments of actual crimes.
NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,Staff Writer | October 14, 1993
Marvin Mandel, backed by a generation of political figures who dominated the government of Maryland for decades, returned to the State House yesterday evening for an event many of those present called long overdue.Mr. Mandel, 73, the convicted, imprisoned, pardoned and legally exonerated former governor, sat quietly by, a look of melancholy playing across his features, as his portrait was finally hung in a place of honor, along with the portraits of most of his predecessors.He brightened considerably when his turn came to speak.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2013
Mittens McGee doesn't exactly look like an artist. He's a friendly, fat, gray-and-white cat who commands a comfy couch in his room with a view at the SPCA of Anne Arundel County in Annapolis. A few weeks ago, though, teen volunteers wrangled Mittens McGee into creating a work of art. They dipped his feet in pet-safe, water-soluble paint and coaxed him to walk across a canvas. The result - a bright, abstract painting that's reminiscent of fall leaves - will be sold next weekend along with other feline, canine and leporine works of art. "We get their feet in the paint and they hop around," said Kirstyn Northrop Cobb, the SPCA's outreach coordinator.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
In the courtroom where Baltimore Circuit Judge Timothy J. Doory metes out justice, he has a steadfast if silent companion, Maj. German H.H. Emory, a lawyer killed in World War I whose portrait hangs to the right of his bench. "He's looking at me every day," Doory said, "so we have a relationship. " But it wasn't until this summer that, by accident of jury duty, Emory's relations would come face to face with his portrait. The mix of happenstance and history so delighted Doory that he hosted a gathering in his courtroom Friday to toast Emory on the 95th anniversary of his battlefield death.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
The man in the red turban is a mystery, and not only because his expression is grave, alert and slightly anxious. He is richly dressed, which clearly makes him a person of some importance. There weren't a lot of black people living in Europe in the 1600s, and even fewer displayed, as this man does, signs of princely favor. It's even more unusual that he was singled out for a painting of his own instead of being included as part of a larger group. Joaneath Spicer, the curator of Renaissance and Baroque art at the Walters Art Museum , thinks she might have uncovered subtle clues in the painting itself that might explain, if not the man's name, then his role, social status and even where he was born.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 23, 2013
If you like paint-by-numbers, the data just released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the U.S. Census create a picture of the United States that is not inspiring. We spend the biggest part of our day - 9 hours and 12 minutes - commuting and working and the other big chunk - 7 hours and 39 minutes - sleeping. Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics show we spend 6 minutes or less on education and talking to people on the phone. We spend three hours on "leisure," and almost all of that is watching TV. We spend proportionally more on housing now (41 percent of our income)
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
Dignity Players' current production of "Art" is a near-flawless effort - a must-see work for everyone who values friendship and realizes what art contributes to life. Yasmina Reza's 1998 Tony Award-winning play depicts how our perception of and reaction to art can test friendships and opinions, yet shows how we can learn from one another in confrontational situations. Dignity's production raises the standard of excellence for acting in local theater, as three actors portray characters who are confident, threatened and pacifistic.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2013
An exhibit featuring portraits of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender Marylanders is now on display at the Maryland Humanities Council offices in Baltimore -- and is open to the public on Thursday. The Montgomery College Arts Institute project, titled "Portraits of Life: LGBT Stories of Being," features adult and childhood pictures of residents "in nearly every aspect of community life" in Montgomery County. "The exhibition's goal is to inspire all to be more accepting and to send a message of hope and understanding to those, especially teens and young adults, who may be struggling with their own identities," the council said in a statement about the project.
NEWS
December 2, 2007
Simmie Knox, an acclaimed artist known for his portrait of President Bill Clinton and other American leaders, will present his portrait of the late philanthropist James H. Gilliam Jr. to St. John's College President Christopher Nelson. Knox, based in Washington, D.C., was selected by St. John's to paint the portrait. Nelson will receive it in the president's office at 3 p.m. Tuesday. Knox has been commissioned to paint portraits of notable Americans such as Clinton, Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Muhammad Ali, congressmen and state senators, a New York City mayor, civic leaders, and numerous individuals, many in Maryland.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg Janene Holzberg | February 1, 2008
With subjects who routinely avoid the spotlight, a reluctant artist who took the job out of friendship, and with little time for sittings, the project almost seemed as though it wasn't meant to be. But persistence paid off. After an unveiling ceremony, the portrait of Peter and Elizabeth Horowitz, Howard County philanthropists and art connoisseurs, greets visitors to the Howard Community College's visual and performing arts center that bears their name....
NEWS
May 22, 2013
Thanks very much and congratulations on Kevin Rector's very informative and sensitive article, "Girl charged in father's death struggled with mental health" (May 19). As educators and professional counselors, and as residents of the Mount Hebron area with children who graduated from the high school, we have been shocked at the news of Dennis Lane's murder. Your story provided valuable information about the complex issues that parents and educators deal with in relation to children and students who have developmental and mental health issues.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | May 16, 2013
There is so much constant movement in our world that it takes an artist to translate some of that motion into a lasting image. In the aptly titled exhibit "Motion" at the Artists' Gallery in Columbia, painters Rana Geralis and Nancy Lee Davis encourage you to linger and look at the animals, people and cars that ordinarily don't slow down for inspection. This pairing of two artists is at its most concentrated in the side-by-side installation of two very small works that amount to portraits of individual animals: Columbia resident Geralis has a watercolor, "Paint Pony," and Clarksville resident Davis has an oil painting, "Cow Eating.
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