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February 15, 2006
"I was really excited to get to shave my head -- it's something I'd wanted to do for a while and now I had a good excuse. ... It was nice to shed that level of vanity for a girl." Natalie Portman, who changes her look for her new film, V for Vendetta Associated Press
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NEWS
By david zurawik and david zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | November 7, 2008
Author and spoken-word artist Henry Rollins is not for everyone. But for those who get the former lead singer of Black Flag, he's a breath of fresh air - particularly for television. Tonight, the Independent Film Channel, doing exactly what a cable outlet dedicated to alternate points of view ought to be doing, presents Henry Rollins Uncut: From New Orleans. Part documentary and part spoken-word performance at the famed Tipitina's music club, the special takes a look at the city three years after Hurricane Katrina.
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NEWS
By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | April 19, 2006
WASHINGTON -- President Bush tapped Rob Portman as his budget chief yesterday, turning to a trusted and popular former congressman to help shake up a White House team showing signs of strain amid Bush's record low approval ratings. Bush chose Susan Schwab, a former University of Maryland administrator who is Portman's top deputy, to succeed him as U.S. trade representative. The announcements marked the start of a series of personnel changes expected as Bush's new chief of staff, former Budget Director Joshua B. Bolten, looks to improve the administration's fraying relationship with a Republican-led Congress and steady a White House thrown off balance by the president's waning influence.
FEATURES
By Capsules by Michael Sragow or Chris Kaltenbach, unless noted. Full reviews are at baltimoresun .com/movies | March 21, 2008
The Band's Visit -- A rapturously low-key comedy about an Egyptian ceremonial police band that flies to Israel to help open an Arab cultural center but arrives at the wrong town. (M.S.) PG-13 89 minutes A+ The Bank Job -- In swinging England 1971, a slick British secret agent coerces a Cockney beauty in a jam to get a crew of her old friends and local "villains" to rob a Lloyd's Bank. Because the bank has been the repository of dirty secrets held by crooked cops, gangsters and whore-mongering ministers and aristocrats, the story is a gift that keeps giving.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 12, 1999
It's possible to see a torch being passed in "Anywhere But Here," a small coming-of-age drama in which Natalie Portman, the shy, lissome center of the movie, effectively steals the show from Susan Sarandon. Portman is too good an actress to make a show of this; her power lies in her ability to draw attention by doing what looks like nothing at all. And Sarandon is generous enough to cede her ground graciously."Anywhere But Here" is a pretty good movie, but it's a great example of class in action.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Story By John Woestendiek and Story By John Woestendiek,Sun Staff | January 20, 2002
MERCER, Pa. -- In his first full week in office, Mayor Christopher D. Portman mastered his new Palm Pilot and fell slave to his cell phone; he tackled zoning issues and helped appoint committees; he made some speeches, received his first hate mail and appeared on CNN. And he cleaned his room. Not that his parents have ever had to nag him about that. Portman keeps his priorities, and everything else, in place, from the political books that fill his shelves (including The Complete Book of U.S. Presidents and All the Best, by former President Bush)
NEWS
October 23, 1997
THOSE LOOKING FOR a fight over reforming the Internal Revenue Service must have been sorely disappointed this week. Most of the opponents of massive change suddenly joined the parade to transform the IRS into a more customer-friendly, efficient collector of the nation's taxes.The House Ways and Means Committee overwhelmingly approved yesterday the bipartisan bill written in large part by Baltimore's Democratic Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, the main co-sponsor along with Rep. Rob Portman, an Ohio Republican.
FEATURES
By RON DICKER and RON DICKER,HARTFORD COURANT | March 17, 2006
New York-- --Andy and Larry Wachowski summoned Natalie Portman to San Francisco from Israel to get inside her head. Then they wanted to inspect her head. The Matrix creators were casting V for Vendetta, the futuristic thriller that they wrote. Portman, a Star Wars star, read a few scenes as Evey, the waif pulled into a masked anarchist's plot to blow up the British Parliament. Evey gets her head shaved in prison, and the Wachowskis asked Portman to pull her hair back so they could imagine her with locks shorn.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | February 29, 2008
That daring brunet minx Anne Boleyn (Natalie Portman) tells her virtuous blond sister Mary (Scarlett Johansson) that love is meaningless without position and power. Anne learns the opposite is true in The Other Boleyn Girl. This rendering of the turbulent second marriage of England's King Henry VIII (Eric Bana) proves too heavy-footed for the old movie two-step of setting up a morality tale, then exploiting it for heat and titillation. The Other Boleyn Girl (Columbia Pictures) Starring Natalie Portman, Scarlett Johansson, Eric Bana.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 6, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Reps. Benjamin L. Cardin, a Baltimore-area Democrat, and Rob Portman, an Ohio Republican, are proposing significant changes in pension law to allow workers to save more money for retirement and to encourage employers to help them do so."The main objective is to get more private retirement savings, particularly among lower-wage and middle-wage earners," Cardin said yesterday."This is an effort to increase savings for Americans."The legislation is intended to make it more attractive for more employers and workers to set aside money for retirement accounts.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | February 29, 2008
That daring brunet minx Anne Boleyn (Natalie Portman) tells her virtuous blond sister Mary (Scarlett Johansson) that love is meaningless without position and power. Anne learns the opposite is true in The Other Boleyn Girl. This rendering of the turbulent second marriage of England's King Henry VIII (Eric Bana) proves too heavy-footed for the old movie two-step of setting up a morality tale, then exploiting it for heat and titillation. The Other Boleyn Girl (Columbia Pictures) Starring Natalie Portman, Scarlett Johansson, Eric Bana.
FEATURES
By Kevin Crust and Kevin Crust,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 16, 2007
Tiny and almost gingerbread-like on the outside, boundless on the inside, the titular toy store of Mr. Magorium's Wonder Emporium is indeed a magical place. A sort of organic, anthropomorphized FAO Schwarz, the emporium is redolent of simpler times with its emphasis on low-fi, nostalgia-inducing toys such as Slinky toys and Legos, along with plenty of other enchantments. A whir of activity and color, it beckons to young and old to surrender to their most innocent beliefs. The movie marks the feature directing debut of screenwriter Zach Helm (Stranger Than Fiction)
NEWS
By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | June 22, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Rob Portman, President Bush's new budget chief, still practices his kayaking moves in the House of Representatives' pool. The former Cincinnati congressman still catches himself during meetings on Capitol Hill referring to lawmakers as "we." But his office is at the other end of Pennsylvania Avenue now and, despite his roots in the legislative branch, he's squarely on the president's side of a battle between the White House and Congress over the power of the purse. The House is to weigh in on the issue today with a vote on Bush's bid to resurrect the line-item veto, which would allow the president to reach into spending bills and single out items for removal, putting lawmakers' most prized prerogative - their ability to secure federal money, or earmarks, for their districts - in peril.
NEWS
By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | April 19, 2006
WASHINGTON -- President Bush tapped Rob Portman as his budget chief yesterday, turning to a trusted and popular former congressman to help shake up a White House team showing signs of strain amid Bush's record low approval ratings. Bush chose Susan Schwab, a former University of Maryland administrator who is Portman's top deputy, to succeed him as U.S. trade representative. The announcements marked the start of a series of personnel changes expected as Bush's new chief of staff, former Budget Director Joshua B. Bolten, looks to improve the administration's fraying relationship with a Republican-led Congress and steady a White House thrown off balance by the president's waning influence.
FEATURES
By RON DICKER and RON DICKER,HARTFORD COURANT | March 17, 2006
New York-- --Andy and Larry Wachowski summoned Natalie Portman to San Francisco from Israel to get inside her head. Then they wanted to inspect her head. The Matrix creators were casting V for Vendetta, the futuristic thriller that they wrote. Portman, a Star Wars star, read a few scenes as Evey, the waif pulled into a masked anarchist's plot to blow up the British Parliament. Evey gets her head shaved in prison, and the Wachowskis asked Portman to pull her hair back so they could imagine her with locks shorn.
FEATURES
February 15, 2006
"I was really excited to get to shave my head -- it's something I'd wanted to do for a while and now I had a good excuse. ... It was nice to shed that level of vanity for a girl." Natalie Portman, who changes her look for her new film, V for Vendetta Associated Press
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1999
If past experience is any indication, the stars of "The Phantom Menace" are in for a pretty wild ride, what with the wide exposure, the devoted fans and the ceaselessly scrutinized "Star Wars" mythology.Certainly, the stars of the first three films have remained pop-culture icons, the centers of a devoted fan base that tracks their every movements.Natalie Portman, who plays Queen Amidala (and is one of only three actors signed for the next two films) and Pernilla August, who plays Anakin Skywalker's mother, Shmi, know their lives may be in for a bit of a change.
FEATURES
By Phoebe Flowers and Phoebe Flowers,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 28, 2000
"Where the Heart Is" is everything that cynical moviegoers despise and the tender-minded adore. Based on the Oprah-endorsed novel by Billie Letts, the story of a pregnant, penniless teen-ager's maturation in rural Oklahoma is a moist, overreaching valentine to the beauty and grace of small-town living. Natalie Portman stars as Novalee Nation, an ecstatically beautiful but misguided 17-year-old in her seventh month of pregnancy. The baby's father, Willy Jack (Dylan Bruno), has dreams of rock star glory, so he packs the uncomplaining Novalee into an $80 car with holes in the floor and sets off from their Tennessee hometown toward a new, uncertain life in California.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 18, 2005
Star Wars: Episode III Revenge of the Sith is a pop masterpiece. George Lucas has done the near-impossible. He's kept his gloriously hyperbolic space fantasy so idiosyncratic and so personal that even its failings become expressive. From the first word -- "War!" -- Lucas plunges viewers into spectacular upheavals of men, women and aliens, cyborgs and droids, and then into a political maelstrom that's elating in its pertinence and audacity. Lucas dares to hinge it all on a love story: something still outside his writing-directing grasp.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2003
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. waited outside the doors to the packed Senate chamber in Annapolis yesterday just seconds before he was to be sworn in as Maryland's 60th governor. Unable to stand still, he clasped his hands before him, bowed his head, and rocked back and forth, toe to heel. Everyone was very quiet. "Hey, you look good from the back," said U.S. Rep. Melissa A. Hart, a Pennsylvania Republican and one of Ehrlich's buddies from Congress. ("I tease him all the time. I can't help it," she added.
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