Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPortfolio Manager
IN THE NEWS

Portfolio Manager

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
John H. "Jack" Laporte Jr., a highly regarded T. Rowe Price portfolio manager who was also a philanthropist and one of the minority owners of the Orioles, died Aug. 12 of complications from lymphoma at his Ruxton home. He was 68. "Jack was one of the great investors of our era, and you never heard that from him. He never talked about it. He was a modest, cultural pillar of our company and a true gentleman," said Brian C. Rogers, T. Rowe Price's chairman and chief investment officer.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | June 3, 2014
The chief investment officer and chairman of T. Rowe Price will step down next year as portfolio manager of one of the company's biggest investment funds. Brian C. Rogers, who has managed the Equity Income Fund since its start in 1985, will remain with T. Rowe in his capacity as CIO and chairman of the board of directors, the firm said in a news release. He is also stepping down as co-portfolio manager of the Institutional Large-Cap Value Fund. “While he is not retiring, in reflecting on this milestone he has decided this will be an opportune time to hand over his portfolio management responsibilities,” the company said in a press release.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 21, 1995
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- There isn't a shortage of mutual fund managers who consider themselves value players. Yet all take a back seat to Edwin Walczak -- portfolio manager of Vontobel U.S. Value Fund and the fund industry's strictest disciple of value gurus Benjamin Graham and Warren Buffett.Adherence to their tenets keeps Mr. Walczak entirely out of major categories of stocks, such as technology and cyclical issues, even when they're dirt-cheap.But his religious-like devotion to value investing -- buying stocks at a discount, presumably because they're temporarily depressed -- has paid off with handsome returns, suggesting this fund makes sense for queasy investors.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
A decade ago, Taymour Tamaddon was an MBA. student with a background in physics trying to convince Baltimore-based money manager T. Rowe Price to hire him as an intern. Not only did Price give him the internship and hire him later as a health care analyst, but six months ago the company chose Tamaddon to head up the Health Sciences Fund, one of the firm's top-performing funds with $7.4 billion in assets. "It's overwhelming, as you can imagine. Exciting, challenging," he said.
BUSINESS
By Mark Calvey and Mark Calvey,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 25, 1991
One key to investment success is to be a step ahead of the crowd. Being among the first to recognize a trend or invest in a successful new company can prove quite profitable.It also can pay to accurately forecast a company's earnings growth, said James Craig, portfolio manager of the Janus Fund in Denver. "What we get paid to do is correctly estimate company earnings," Mr. Craig said. "Money follows earnings."We build a portfolio of companies where our estimates of earnings growth exceed what others expect," he said.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff writer | January 13, 1993
Legg Mason Inc., which last summer hired Edward A. Taber III away from his job of running the fixed-income division of T. Rowe Price Associates Inc., has snagged two of Mr. Taber's colleagues from Price.Keith J. Gardner, who was a vice president, global bond trader and portfolio manager at Price, has been hired as vice president and senior global fixed-income portfolio manager at Legg Mason.And Elizabeth L. Daniels, who was an investment specialist with Price, has been named vice president and investment specialist at Legg.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | January 16, 1991
It could've been a lot worse.That's a generous assessment of the overall performance of the nation's mutual funds in 1990, a year wracked by economic uncertainty and worrisome world events."
BUSINESS
September 24, 1990
Upcoming guests and topics on "Wall $treet Week With Louis Rukeyser," produced by Maryland Public Television. It airs at 8:30 p.m. Fridays on Channels 22, 26 and 67 and is repeated Saturdays at noon on Channel 26 and Sundays at 12:30 p.m. on Channels 22 and 67.SEPT. 28: "Are Pollution Control Stocks a Waste?" -- Guest: Kenneth C. Leung, managing director, Smith Barney Harris Upham & Co. The outlook for the environment and waste management companies with a top analyst in the field.OCT. 5: "Where Does the Market Go from Here?"
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | August 20, 1993
U.S. bond yields, driven by another piece of news suggesting that the economy is hurting, fell to a record 6.18 percent before rebounding, the ninth straight day the record tumbled.The closing yield was 6.21 percent, down four basis points.Bonds were helped when the Commerce Department said the merchandise trade deficit widened to $12.1 billion for June. The gap was nearly 50 percent larger than expected, adding to investors' perception that the economy and inflation won't grow more than 3 percent this year.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2012
Longtime T. Rowe Price money manager Robert Gensler is retiring at the end of the year after 19 years with the Baltimore company. Gensler, 54, a Baltimore native, has managed the $591 million T. Rowe Price Global Stock Fund since 2005. Previously, he oversaw the Media & Telecommunications Fund and the Global Technology Fund. He joined the firm as an equity research analyst in 1993. David Eiswert will succeed Gensler as the Global Stock Fund's portfolio manager on Oct. 1, Price said Friday.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2013
Timothy E. Parker, manager of T. Rowe Price's New Era Fund who had announced earlier this year he would be leaving, has decided to remain with the Baltimore-based money manager, the company said. As previously announced, Parker still will step down as manager of the $4.3 billion fund by the end of September and be replaced by Shawn T. Driscoll. In Parker's new role, he will focus on small-cap and mid-cap natural resources investments and work with other portfolio managers, the company said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
John H. "Jack" Laporte Jr., a highly regarded T. Rowe Price portfolio manager who was also a philanthropist and one of the minority owners of the Orioles, died Aug. 12 of complications from lymphoma at his Ruxton home. He was 68. "Jack was one of the great investors of our era, and you never heard that from him. He never talked about it. He was a modest, cultural pillar of our company and a true gentleman," said Brian C. Rogers, T. Rowe Price's chairman and chief investment officer.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2013
T. Rowe Price has a reputation as a place where portfolio managers can spend their entire careers. But over 12 weeks this year, three fund managers left the Baltimore-based investment company or announced plans to do so. Two left suddenly, with a star manager taking two top analysts along. That's high turnover for any fund company, but particularly at Price, where the average tenure of a fund manager at the firm is 15 years. "It's out of character," said Laura Lallos, an analyst with Chicago-based Morningstar Inc., which tracks funds.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2012
Longtime T. Rowe Price money manager Robert Gensler is retiring at the end of the year after 19 years with the Baltimore company. Gensler, 54, a Baltimore native, has managed the $591 million T. Rowe Price Global Stock Fund since 2005. Previously, he oversaw the Media & Telecommunications Fund and the Global Technology Fund. He joined the firm as an equity research analyst in 1993. David Eiswert will succeed Gensler as the Global Stock Fund's portfolio manager on Oct. 1, Price said Friday.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Chicago Tribune | December 7, 2008
The talk about shrewd investment maneuvers to be well-positioned for a new U.S. president has largely vanished. From the economy to international terrorism, many of President-elect Barack Obama's priorities will be handed to him as he takes the oath of office, making many of his own initiatives secondary. The entire U.S. government will play a significant role in the future of our investments. Expect dramatic events, successes, failures and continuing volatility. The shape in which the government leaves the troubled companies it touches, their shareholders and bondholders remains to be seen.
BUSINESS
By Carolyn Bigda and Carolyn Bigda,Tribune Media Services | April 13, 2008
You can see major movies that are "carbon neutral," buy any flavor of organic yogurt and even watch as Bob Costas recaps Sunday football by candlelight for NBC. With climate change increasingly at the top of people's minds - it was identified as a major concern for students at a recent round table of university and college presidents - big business is responding. In some cases, the effort is real; in others, it's what Garvin Jabusch, a former portfolio manager for the Sierra Club Stock Fund, calls "green washing."
BUSINESS
By WERNER RENBERG and WERNER RENBERG,1992 Werner Renberg | May 31, 1992
When Morris Smith decided to devote more time to his family and quit as portfolio manager of the $20.4 billion Fidelity Magellan Fund July 1, he did more than raise eyebrows among his shareholders -- he set off a series of changes in Fidelity's equity fund lineup.To succeed Smith, Fidelity management chose Jeffrey Vinik, portfolio manager of Fidelity Growth & Income Portfolio. He has been succeeded by Andrew Midler, portfolio manager of Fidelity Equity-Income II Fund, who had been succeeded by Brian S. Posner, portfolio manager of Fidelity Value Fund, who has been succeeded by Richard Fentin, portfolio manager of Fidelity Puritan Fund, who -- is staying put. He just picked up another fund.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2001
For the first time since mid-March, the Dow Jones industrial average closed above 10,000 yesterday, leading some market watchers to be cautiously optimistic that the stock market may have finally hit bottom. But others warn that stocks may still be vulnerable to a downslide depending on first-quarter earnings reports that are beginning to be released. The Dow, an index of 30 blue chip stocks, rose 257.59 points, or 2.62 percent, to 10,102.74, closing above the psychologically important 10,000 mark for the first time since March 15. "You can't ever pick a low with any precision, but we are pretty optimistic," said David Straus, senior portfolio manager with Washington--based Johnston Lemon Asset Management Inc. Straus blamed some of the recent market declines on investors raising money to pay taxes.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | October 15, 2006
Back in 1999, as the world was fixated on the potential for haywire computers to cripple the financial system, experts had little clue to what the next star investments would be. The top 10 mutual funds since Dec. 31, 1999, are beneficiaries of an abrupt farewell to U.S. growth stocks and rush to energy, real estate, precious metals and international stocks. Rather than lead a transition to the high-tech world, the year 2000 and the bursting of the tech bubble ushered in a retrenchment into hard assets.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.