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NEWS
September 3, 2003
On August 30, 2003, NAOMI (nee Johnson), beloved wife of the late Maurice C. Porterfield, M.D., beloved mother of Richard M. Porterfield, Ph.D.; grandmother of Andrew Porterfield and Brian Porterfield, and sister of the late David Johnson and Kenneth Johnson; also survived by one great-grandchild. Services and interment will be private. Arrangements are by the Eline Funeral Home, Hampstead. Memorial contributions to Carroll Hospice, 95 Carroll Street, Westminster, Md 21157.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2013
The "Diner" guys, Tracy Turnblad and the moody teens of Hamilton will be basking in the New York spotlight this month, thanks to a Museum of Modern Art exhibition focusing on the works of Baltimore filmmakers Barry Levinson, John Waters and Matt Porterfield. "Our Town: Baltimore," running through Dec. 24 at the venerable Manhattan art showcase, opens Thursday with Levinson's 1982 "Diner," an ode to '50s-era Colts fanaticism and the shift from the easy answers of adolescence to the complicated relationships of adulthood.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2003
Naomi J. Porterfield, a nurse who assisted her physician husband's medical practice in what was then rural Carroll County, died of congestive heart failure Aug. 30 at her Hampstead home. She was 100. She was born Naomi Johnson and raised in Middleburg, Carroll County, the daughter of a carriage maker. "After the eighth grade, she rode a Western Maryland Railway passenger train to Westminster, where she attended high school," said her son, Richard M. Porterfield of Hampstead. One of her fondest memories, which she enjoyed recounting, was traveling to Washington by train in 1913 to attend Woodrow Wilson's presidential inauguration.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Familial bonds are not easily broken. Bent, stretched, ripped, damaged and warped all out of shape? Definitely. But irreparably broken? Rarely. Baltimore director Matt Porterfield's "I Used To Be Darker" looks carefully at what it means to be a family, at the responsibilities those bonds entail and the costs they exact. With great tenderness and relentless honesty, it watches as parents and children struggle over just how strong the ties that bind them together are. The result is a film consistently perceptive and occasionally revelatory, one that holds up a mirror to who we are, posing questions and suggesting answers, but trusting enough in its audiences' intelligence to let them draw their own conclusions.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2002
In a Hamilton kitchen, a movie scene is rehearsed: Actress Gina Christine speaks with her wayward son Joe on the phone while she makes peanut butter sandwiches. "We haven't seen you in a while," she says. The conversation is terse, and significant for what's left unsaid. Christine hangs up and finishes making lunch for her two daughters. "The towel on your shoulder is an interesting touch," director Matt Porterfield says, pleased with the rehearsal. "I do that at home," Christine says.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2004
The Community Services Council bestowed its annual Sylvia Canon award last week on a woman who daily makes a difference in the lives of shut-ins. Debbie Porterfield, program administrator for Meals on Wheels of Central Maryland Inc., oversees the delivery of about 120 well-balanced, hot meals every day to "the homebound of all ages and economic status," she said. At the council meeting Wednesday, she received an etched glass globe that said, "You make a world of difference." "There really is no better sentiment," said Audrey Cimino, director of the Community Foundation of Carroll County and a community council member.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2004
The grass is clipped and a new fence surrounds the small cemetery on Rattlesnake Ridge, where Joan H. Porterfield collects a few sticks and trash from around her great-great-great-grandparents' graves. This restored plot encompasses the Richards family burying ground - the probable resting place of Edward Richards, an English Quaker whose family founded the town of Hampstead, beginning with 50 acres granted to him in 1739 by Lord Baltimore. The cemetery - circa 1750 to 1870 - lies on a grassy knoll with two new schools, and single-family homes and condominiums are under construction around it. The graveyard is to be rededicated at 2 p.m. Sunday in a ceremony that will include several Richards descendants.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN REPORTER | May 7, 2006
Growing up in Baltimore's Hamilton neighborhood, Matthew Porterfield never thought he was living in paradise. But it was close enough, just the sort of place from which a budding filmmaker could draw inspiration. "There's just so many different kinds of homes, all sorts of styles," Porterfield, 28, says of the northeast Baltimore neighborhood that would serve as both the setting and the title of his first film, which will be screened Saturday and Sunday evenings at this week's ninth annual Maryland Film Festival.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | September 28, 1994
Hampstead is trying to get all of its former mayors together at Town Hall but can't seem to find four of them for the celebration.Once the town finds photographs or portraits of Mayors William Warehime, Thomas J. Hunt, Benjamin Stansbury and J. Frank Switzer, all 14 of Hampstead's leaders since 1892 will be represented on the council chamber wall, said Westminster photographer Bob Porterfield.Mr. Porterfield, who grew up in Hampstead, is copying and restoring the photos for the project town officials started last fall.
NEWS
November 15, 2005
On November 13, 2005, J. KENNETH BAUST of Westminster; beloved husband of Elsie L. Baust; devoted father of Josie Porterfield (Tim), Lutherville and Toby J. Baust (Joyce), Westminster. Also survived by two grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, two sisters and three brothers. Visitation at Hartzler Funeral Home, 310 Church St., New Windsor, 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. Tuesday. Memorial service 11:00 A.M. Wednesday at Krug Chapel, Carroll Lutheran Village, 300 St. Luke Circle, Westminster. Memorial contributions may be made to Johns Hopkins Oncology Center, 600 N. Wolfe St., Baltimore, MD 21287 or to Carroll Lutheran Village Residents' Fund, 300 St. Luke Circle, Westminster, MD 21158.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2013
Matt Porterfield's new film, "I Used To Be Darker," has been a festival favorite abroad. But soon Baltimore will get the first wider-release peek. According to a statement, the Baltimore director's third film will have its national opening in Baltimore Sept. 27. Porterfield told us that Strand Releasing has agreed to let Baltimore get first dibs on the film, before New York and Los Angeles. The film is scheduled to open at The Charles Theatre. It also screened at the Maryland Film Festival in May. Porterfield, who won the Sondheim Artscape Prize in 2011, has garnered acclaim for his films "Hamilton" and "Putty Hill," both set and filmed in and around Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2012
"I Used to be Darker," the latest movie from Baltimore's Matt Porterfield, will be shown at January's Sundance Film Festival, organizers announced Wednesday. "I was in a bit of a state of shock," said Porterfield, who was on a return bus trip from New York when he got the news. "I'm ecstatic. " The movie, Porterfield's third feature as a writer-director, tells the story of a runaway from Northern Ireland who moves in with her aunt and uncle in Baltimore, and the family crises that ensue.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2011
"I Used to Be Darker" is meant to jump from the blocks at full speed: A 19-year-old discovers that she's pregnant, grabs a knife and exacts devastating revenge on the cad who knocked her up. After she loses her job overseeing bumper cars at an Ocean City arcade, she high-tails it to Baltimore. The film's writer-director, Matt Porterfield, and his co-writer (and partner), Amy Belk, pack a midsummer day's nightmare into a vivid streak of incidents. It could be the perfect lift-off for the rest of the story – and no one doubts Porterfield's ability to pull the sequence off. "Hamilton" and "Putty Hill," his first two features, demonstrated his skill at delivering keen emotion on the run. But Porterfield, who is shooting the rest of the script in Baltimore, has bet the completion of "I Used to Be Darker" on his ability to raise $40,000 by Aug. 13 through Kickstarter, the website for creative entrepreneurs.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2011
The morning after an independent filmmaker heard he's been given a $25,000 arts award, he tried to assess what the check would mean. Matthew Porterfield, who walked away with the Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize on Saturday, worked seven years as a waiter at the Chameleon Cafe in Northeast Baltimore to support himself as an artist who made films the way he wanted. In his top-earning year, he once made $30,000 as a kindergarten teacher. Many years he made less than $12,000, despite high critical praise for his cinematic treatments involving the lives of people living in the Northeast Baltimore, where he was born and still resides.
NEWS
Baltimore Sun staff | July 9, 2011
Matthew Porterfield, the filmmaker behind "Putty Hill" and "Hamilton," was named the winner of the sixth annual Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize on Saturday. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and the Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts announced the winner of the $25,000 fellowship given every year in conjunction with Artscape at the Baltimore Museum of Art , where his installation is on display. "I'm speechless. To be a finalist among such fine artists is such an honor," Porterfield said Saturday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2011
Matt Porterfield is a hard-knocks poet — a rhapsodist in black and blue — whose work gains strength from its Baltimore roots. Porterfield located his first two movies, 2007's "Hamilton" and his current "Putty Hill," quite ruthlessly in the Baltimore neighborhhoods that give these films their names. So acute is his focus on authentic textures and characters — and so revealing are the epiphanies he ignites on the fly — that these tales of working-class endurance and rebellion have reverberated around the world.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2004
The grass is clipped and a new fence surrounds the small cemetery on Rattlesnake Ridge in Hampstead, where Joan H. Porterfield collects a few sticks and trash from around her great-great-great-grandparents' graves. This restored Carroll County plot encompasses the Richards family burial ground - the probable resting place of Edward Richards, an English Quaker whose family founded the town of Hampstead, beginning with 50 acres granted to him in 1739 by Lord Baltimore. The cemetery - circa 1750 to 1870 - lies on a grassy knoll with two new schools, and single-family homes and condominiums are under construction around it. The graveyard is to be rededicated at 2 p.m. Sunday in a ceremony that will include several Richards descendants.
NEWS
January 17, 1993
Name: Marguerite Luckett of EastportVolunteer Work/Interests: Ms. Luckett, a retiree from the Foreign Service, is among some 100 volunteers for the Hospice of the Anne Arundel Medical Center.Despite a busy schedule as a real estate agent and her involvement with various community activities and organizations, Ms. Luckett shares time with patients in the hospice program.HTC "I want to do whatever I can to help the patient out, or the care-giver," she says. "If I can help them alleviate stress in some way, I'm happy to do so.The "whatever" she can do includes running errands, reading or watching television with the patient or just taking time to talk."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2011
Matt Porterfield's restless and moving "Putty Hill" is about a pocket of working-class Baltimoreans reacting to the overdose death of a 24-year-old man. It finds seductive underlying forms in what outsiders might consider shapeless lives. When skateboarders and BMXers streak up and down and over a course of concrete dips and valleys, and a teenager tags a wall with a spray-paint baroque version of "Rest in peace, Cody," they prove that they have poetry in them. The director doesn't impose his poetry on them.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2011
Matt Porterfield says we can credit Jean-Luc Godard's "Masculine-Feminine" (1966) for the interview structure of "Putty Hill. " He also says that Martin Bell's hard-to-find "Streetwise," about Seattle street kids, exerted a huge influence on his two films about youth: "'Streetwise' is a documentary that acts like a narrative, 'Putty Hill' is a narrative that acts like a documentary.'" But he also cited three other masterpieces, readily available on...
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