Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPort Of Baltimore
IN THE NEWS

Port Of Baltimore

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer Staff Writer Ted Shelsby contributed to this article | May 11, 1995
The trade sanctions threatened by the Clinton administration against Japan would hurt the port of Baltimore, but the severity of the impact here would depend on where punitive measures are targeted, port officials said yesterday.Baltimore is one of the largest automobile ports in the country, with cars and trucks accounting for more than a third of all the longshoremen's work. But the port handles relatively few Japanese luxury cars, such as the Lexus, and only a fraction of the estimated 2 million tons of automobile parts imported from Japan last year.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
The port of Baltimore handled more automobiles, cargo containers and wood pulp in 2013 than ever before, a record-setting performance despite continuing labor unrest on its public docks. Solidifying its place as the nation's No. 1 port for automobile imports and exports, the Maryland Port Administration said Tuesday that it handled 749,100 cars and trucks in 2013, up from 652,000 in 2012. The increase was due in part to newly inked contracts with auto manufacturers, including a five-year deal with Mazda announced in August.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | March 9, 1991
Companhia Maritima Nacional, a Brazilian steamship operator, became yesterday the fourth line in less than a month to announce plans for new or expanded service from the port of Baltimore.Nacional Line, as it is commonly known, said that its first vessel will call at Baltimore about March 20. Initially the line will have two ships on the route between the East Coast of the United States and Brazil, providing service from Baltimore about once every three weeks.The company plans to add a third ship later, a move that would allow a ship to call at Baltimore once every two weeks.
NEWS
March 8, 2014
I felt compelled to respond to the misleading and inaccurate statements in Anita Heygster's recent letter regarding the Port of Baltimore ( "Port union is hurting its members," March 4). The decision to close the terminal on holidays is a management decision, not one made by the union. We have worked and will continue to work those holidays if the terminal is open. Seagirt Marine terminal does not shut down for lunch, as you stated. We work on a rotating schedule to make sure the terminal is open to process trucks.
NEWS
September 12, 1996
ENVIRONMENTALISTS won't like aspects of the Glendening administration's plan to dispose of dredged material from Chesapeake Bay harbor channels. Neither will penny-pinching conservatives. Or some watermen. Yet implementing the program is key to keeping the Port of Baltimore competitive in a cutthroat maritime industry.This is no small matter. The port accounts for over $2 billion a year in economic activity. It creates employment for 62,500 Marylanders. It generates $141 million in state and local taxes.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | April 15, 1999
An advisory council gave the Maryland Port Administration a green light yesterday to negotiate a lease with the owners of the former Navy hospital ship the Sanctuary, lifting a major hurdle to a planned shipboard program for recovering female drug addicts.The council, formed last year to advise the port administration on how to best use its vacant properties, voted 9-1 that the Sanctuary's program was "compatible" with the business of the port of Baltimore, as long as it could be operated safely and it complied with city zoning laws.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS and MELISSA HARRIS,SUN REPORTER | January 3, 2006
Walter F. Kropp, a second-generation Port of Baltimore worker who hired workers to load and unload ships, and invented a horn to improve longshoremen's safety, died of pneumonia Wednesday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The longtime Baltimore resident was 86. "As a kid I never saw my father because he worked around the clock, especially during the Vietnam War" when he ran the Army's contracts at Dundalk Marine Terminal, said his son, Gary Kropp of Monkton, who followed in his father's footsteps and handles billing for P&O Ports.
NEWS
June 30, 2000
CHANGE IS difficult, especially when it affects the way you do your job. That helps explain why members of International Longshoremen's Association Local 333 twice rejected new work rules that could mean a big increase in shipping at the port of Baltimore. Why make further concessions, many of them asked. Enough is enough. But not when those work changes could lead to a dramatic jump in the number of ships docking at Baltimore. Wallenius Wilhelmsen, the world's largest maritime carrier of cars, farm equipment and other roll-on/roll-off cargo, wants to make Baltimore its regional hub. The state wants to spend tens of millions of dollars on new facilities at a 150-acre port site.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1996
Hobelmann Port Services Inc. and its sister company, Crown Auto Processing Inc., which handle the majority of cars shipped through the port of Baltimore, are being sold to a British firm for $33 million.The acquisition by Benicia Ports PLC includes Hobelmann's Fairfield and Atlantic marine terminals -- two private facilities encompassing more than 100 acres in Southeast Baltimore. Crown Auto leases space at the state-owned Dundalk Marine Terminal. The sale next month is not expected to change Hobelmann's 225-person work force, said William A. Kroh, president and part owner of the privately held companies.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1999
President Clinton's 2000 budget will include about $25 million for dredging in Maryland, financing that will allow construction to begin on three of the port of Baltimore's main channel-access projects, U.S. Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes said yesterday.If approved by Congress, the money would allow the Army Corps of Engineers to widen one channel leading to the port, straighten another, and begin the second phase of the Poplar Island disposal project -- essentially the building up of an island to hold dredged material.
NEWS
March 7, 2014
Letter writer Anita Heygster's claim that the Port of Baltimore is only open five days a week and closed on holidays is incorrect ( "Port union is hurting its members," March 4). The Port of Baltimore has one of the most flexible work schedules on the East Coast. Ship operations continue 24/7, with only six holidays a year when there is no work allowed. The only exception to that is for cruise ships, which work any day of the year. Ms. Heygster might want to check her facts before making such erroneous and misleading statements.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2013
Robert V. Rood, a retired longshoreman and world champion powerlifter, died Tuesday of heart failure at his Pasadena home. He was 73. Robert Vincent Rood was born in Berwick, Pa., and moved with his family to a home on East Hill Street in South Baltimore in the 1940s. He attended Mergenthaler Vocational-Technical High School. He served in the Navy as a ship's carpenter from 1957 to 1964, aboard aircraft carriers USS Franklin D. Roosevelt in the Atlantic and USS Kitty Hawk in the Pacific.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
Frank Hamons, a trained biologist who for the past 30 years has led efforts to dredge the port of Baltimore's channels, has left the Maryland Port Administration for the private sector. Hamons, 71, who worked his last day as deputy director for harbor development Oct. 31, has taken a new job with Baltimore-based Gahagan & Bryant Associates, an engineering and consulting firm that focuses on dredging and port development projects. He will be replaced by David Blazer, the port administration's chief of dredged material management, who has worked under Hamons for the past three years.
NEWS
October 19, 2013
At the beginning of the year, the Port of Baltimore was on a roll. At Seagirt Marine Terminal, the ribbon was cut on a 50-foot-deep berth financed by a $1.3 billion public-private partnership between the port and Ports America Chesapeake. The investment positioned Baltimore to be a major East Coast port of call for the larger ships expected in 2014 when the Panama Canal's expansion is completed. The port was doing record business: 9.55 million tons of cargo over the past fiscal year and a surge in the cruise business, too. The biggest concern was about how the port would find room to expand - and even that challenge looked like it would soon be met at Coke Point, the former iron ore pier at Sparrows Point, with plans to convert it into an automobile terminal and replace some of the 2,000 jobs lost when the steelmaking facility went out of business last year.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
Richard P. Hughes Jr., a port labor leader recalled as a "feared negotiator" who rose to become president of the International Longshoremen's Association, died of heart and lung disease Sept. 11 at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. The Locust Point resident was 79. "Richie Hughes had four loves - his family, the union, its membership and the Port of Baltimore," said Helen Delich Bentley, a former member of Congress and past chairwoman of the Federal Maritime Commission. During his lengthy career, he represented 65,000 seaport workers from Maine to Texas.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
Vice President Joe Biden will visit the Port of Baltimore today as part of a tour of East Coast ports seeking federal money to accommodate increased freight expected from the Panama Canal in coming years. The White House said last week Biden would add Baltimore to an earlier announced line up of visits to the ports of Savannah, Ga., and Charleston, S.C. Biden is scheduled later this month to visit Panama, where an expansion of the canal is expected to be completed in 2015. Biden's trip was announced days after the U.S. Department of Transportation awarded Baltimore a $10 million grant to build more access to rail, expand storage at Fairfield Marine Terminal, and help widen the channel at Seagirt Marine Terminal.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Michael Dresser and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2005
President Bush came to the port of Baltimore yesterday to deliver a forceful defense of the USA Patriot Act and to demand that Congress extend 16 expiring provisions without modification. Standing before several uniformed law enforcement officers at the Dundalk Marine Terminal's cruise ship terminal, Bush described the Patriot Act as a vital tool for fighting terrorism. The act gave law enforcement and intelligence agencies broad new investigative powers while letting them work more closely together.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1999
Mediterranean Shipping Co., a global steamship line based in Geneva, will add a weekly stop in the port of Baltimore next month, giving a boost to the container cargo business that local officials have struggled to maintain in recent years.The Swiss company will add Baltimore to its service connecting the U.S. East Coast with the west coast of South America. The first ship is to call here Nov. 26."This is really very good news for us," said Jim White, executive director of the Maryland Port Administration, which manages the state's public marine terminals.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2013
The port of Baltimore won a $10 million federal grant to build more access to rail, expand storage at Fairfield Marine Terminal, and help widen the channel at Seagirt Marine Terminal to accommodate bigger ships. The cash – to be matched by a state grant of $19.5 million – will pay for upgrades that position Baltimore's busy port to compete with other East Coast terminals for cargo off the world's widest boats, which will soon be passing through a newly expanded Panama Canal. Maryland's congressional delegation announced the U.S. Department of Transportation grant Friday.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2013
U.S. commerce "would grind to a halt in a matter of days" in the aftermath of a crippling cyberattack that the nation's ports — including Baltimore — are ill-prepared for, according to a new Brookings Institution report. But port officials here and elsewhere dispute the assessment written by Coast Guard Cmdr. Joseph Kramek, who spent a year as a Brookings fellow looking at cybersecurity at six of the nation's busiest waterfronts. The study concluded that failure to bolster defenses against hackers could lead to disruption of the computer networks used to move goods, fuel and food from ships to the marketplace.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.