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SPORTS
By From Staff Reports | November 21, 1994
Senior forward T. J. Hall, last year's Patriot League MVP,led Navy to a 91-63 exhibition win over Korabel (Ukraine) at Alumni Hall yesterday.Hall, from Port Jefferson, N.Y., scored 22 points, grabbed five rebounds, hit all four of his attempts from three-point range and made seven assists.Korabel's Oleg Tkatch scored 26 points and added four assists and four steals to his totals.Navy received solid contributions in the middle from junior center Alex Kohnen (17 points, 11 rebounds) and senior forward Wes Cooper (14 points, nine rebounds)
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NEWS
July 12, 1995
Helene Johnson, 89, whose poetry about the life of blacks in America contributed to the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s and '30s, died Friday in New York. In an essay published in 1972, Ronald Primeau wrote that Ms. Johnson helped establish the Harlem Renaissance's "validity as a movement."Sir James Cameron Tudor, 75, a former deputy prime minister in Barbados, died Sunday after a heart attack in Bridgetown. He was one of the founders of the Democratic Labor Party in 1955. The party assumed power in 1961 and led the former British colony through independence in 1966.
NEWS
November 26, 1991
Florence Richards Miller, a retired college librarian, died Sunday of emphysema at a daughter's home in Severna Park.Services were being held today at St. Martin's-in-the-Field Episcopal Church, 375 Benfield Road in Severna Park.Mrs. Miller, who was 74, moved to Severna Park four years ago. She retired in 1986 after 20 years of service in the acquisitions department of the library of the State University of New York at Stony Brook.The former Florence Richards was a native of Massena, N.Y., who also lived in Port Jefferson, N.Y., and Miller Place, N.Y. She earned a bachelor's degree in bacteriology at Purdue University.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | June 12, 1992
DETROIT -- Citing mismanagement and poor judgment, General Motors Corp. ordered a major housecleaning at its finance subsidiary yesterday in the wake of an embarrassing $422 million fraud case involving one of its car dealers.GM replaced the president, the chief financial officer and the operations boss of General Motors Acceptance Corp. It also reassigned several other officials and said it was taking disciplinary action against "numerous" employees at GMAC's Smithtown, N.Y., office.It was GM's first substantive comment in the case of former dealer John McNamara of Port Jefferson, N.Y., who is accused in a federal indictment of bilking GMAC out of $422 million in an elaborate phony export scheme.
NEWS
December 20, 1998
Toots Mansfield, 84, a seven-time world champion calf roper and a charter member of the Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame, died of pneumonia Wednesday in El Paso, Texas. He took up rodeo to make money during the Depression.Carlos Foster, 76, a cowboy who taught riding to city children and promoted the role of blacks in the development of the Old West, died in New York on Dec. 12 of heart failure.Robert Johnston, 85, an engineer known for designing foundations for some of New York City's most important buildings, died Dec. 4 at his home in Millbrook, N.Y. His excavation and foundation construction plans were used for the United Nations, the former Chase Manhattan bank headquarters and the 92-acre landfill that became Battery Park City.
NEWS
July 18, 2003
George J. Vakoutis, the retired owner of a truck rental business, died of cancer Saturday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Parkville resident was 84. Born in Baltimore and raised in Highlandtown, Mr. Vakoutis dropped out of city public schools to help run his family's restaurant. At age 16, he began working on oil and coal barges in the Baltimore harbor. He enlisted in the Army in 1939 and worked in the motor pool. After World War II, he continued working on barges and tugs, then became a driver for Branch Motor Freight and, later, Wooleyhan Trucking.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and By Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2001
John H. Mears Jr., a retired businessman and developer of Mears Marina in Annapolis, died Oct. 10 of a heart attack at Anne Arundel Medical Center. He was 87. Mr. Mears' entrepreneurial spirit began as a youngster in Garden City, N.Y., and during summers at his family's home in Port Jefferson, Long Island. Born in Washington, he later moved to Garden City, into a home across the street from a golf course. He learned to play the game there, and by the 1930s was working as assistant pro at the Congressional Country Club in Washington and at the Bald Peak Colony Club in New Hampshire.
NEWS
December 14, 2004
MARGARET (MARGE) B. ACKERMANN, 82, of Freehold died late on Sunday, December 12, 2004 at the Manor Nursing Home in Freehold. She was born in Baltimore on June 14, 1922 to Martin and Alice Baurenschub. The youngest of eight children, Marge was educated in Catholic schools in Baltimore and was married in 1946 to Henry J. (Harry) Ackermann. They lived in Baltimore, then moved to Niagara Falls, N.Y., Port Jefferson, N.Y., North Haven, Conn. and Hamilton Square before retiring to Freehold. Marge was an enormously energetic and loving wife, mother, grandmother and great- grandmother.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2002
New positions Wilson, King, Ge named to posts at Benelogic Benelogic LLC, the Timonium-based employee benefits software applications firm, appointed Scott Wilson as director of regional sales; Byron King as systems engineer; and Peijian Ge as a systems integration engineer. Wilson, a graduate of West Virginia University, was formerly with the sales staff of Aetna. King, a former Internet service administrator with Digex Inc., graduated form Wesleyan University; Ge, a graduate of the Illinois Institute of Technology, was with AON Corp.
NEWS
July 15, 1995
Dr. Morton L. LevinEpidemiologistDr. Morton L. Levin, the former Baltimore resident who was among the first epidemiologists to link cigarette smoking to lung cancer, died July 7 of pneumonia at a hospital in Riverhead, N.Y. He was 91.Dr. Levin, who moved from Baltimore to Port Jefferson, N.Y., in 1989, was still a visiting professor of epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, a position he had held since 1967.He began a study of the smoking habits of cancer patients at the Roswell Park Memorial Institute in Buffalo, N.Y., in 1938.
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