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NEWS
February 22, 2003
GEORGE A. SCHOCK, JR., died on February 19, 2003, at the Maryland Masonic Homes, in Cockeysville, MD, lifelong resident and Fire Chief of Millville, NJ, builder of the battleship USS New Jersey, survived by his daughter, Rebecca Voneiff and son-in-law, John Voneiff, of Baltimore, MD; and four grandchildren: Dr. Elizabeth Voneiff and George A. Schock, IV, of Fort Collins, CO, and Deborah Schock and Michael Schock of Wilmington, DE. His wife of 56 years,...
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 1, 2005
PORT ELIZABETH, South Africa - Anywhere but South Africa, rugby is just a sport, not a volatile indicator of relations between blacks and whites. The latest reminder that rugby is this nation's national obsession came last month when the South African Rugby Union decided against awarding a newly created team to Port Elizabeth, the struggling city on the Indian Ocean in the Eastern Cape, the region considered the heart of black South African rugby....
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NEWS
March 26, 2005
On Thursday, March 24, 2005, GEORGE LUIZ, 60, of Naples, FL, passed away peacefully. George was born April 23, 1944 in Durban, South Africa. George relocated with his family to the United States in 1987 and lived in Baltimore, Maryland prior to moving to Naples in 2002. He is survived by his wife, Gillian and two children Michelle and Geoffrey. He is also survived by his father and mother, Goncalo and Mary Luiz, and sister Dolores of Port Elizabeth, South Africa. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to American Heart Association, 28441 Bonita Crossings Blvd, Bonita Springs, FL 34135.
NEWS
March 26, 2005
On Thursday, March 24, 2005, GEORGE LUIZ, 60, of Naples, FL, passed away peacefully. George was born April 23, 1944 in Durban, South Africa. George relocated with his family to the United States in 1987 and lived in Baltimore, Maryland prior to moving to Naples in 2002. He is survived by his wife, Gillian and two children Michelle and Geoffrey. He is also survived by his father and mother, Goncalo and Mary Luiz, and sister Dolores of Port Elizabeth, South Africa. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to American Heart Association, 28441 Bonita Crossings Blvd, Bonita Springs, FL 34135.
NEWS
January 15, 1992
A new Sakhisizwe Christian Ministries of South Africa has been started here by Don Bixler, formerly director of development for HampsteadYouth for Christ.Bixler and his wife, Judy, were former missionaries with youth for Christ in South Africa in 1990, where they developed a love for the poor people of the black townships.In February 1990, Sakhisizwe Christian Ministries of Kwazakhele (a township near Port Elizabeth) was formed by Sicelo Duze, former executive director with Youth for Christ in Port Elizabeth and the Bixlers' boss.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | August 21, 1994
PORT ELIZABETH, South Africa -- The office that Necba Faku occupies in Port Elizabeth's city hall is bigger than the entire house he grew up in."Oh, much bigger," he tells visitors who have come to see South Africa's first black mayor.He is the mayor because this city has dared to take on one of the most complicated challenges in the country's transition to nonracial, democratic rule.Nelson Mandela is the country's president. A new national Parliament is dominated by members of his African National Congress.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 1, 2005
PORT ELIZABETH, South Africa - Anywhere but South Africa, rugby is just a sport, not a volatile indicator of relations between blacks and whites. The latest reminder that rugby is this nation's national obsession came last month when the South African Rugby Union decided against awarding a newly created team to Port Elizabeth, the struggling city on the Indian Ocean in the Eastern Cape, the region considered the heart of black South African rugby....
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff writer | April 29, 1992
No one said starting a new ministry would be easy.But for Don and Judy Bixler, United States directors for the Sakhisizwe Christian Ministries, pursuing their dream of ministering to black South Africans is a step of faith they are willing to take each day."This is definitely something God worked out," Judy said of the fledgling ministry, which includes a multi-racial church in Kwazakheletownship and a school in Port Elizabeth. "We never could have done this through our own effort."The couple, who returned in January 1991 from a year's work on the east cape of South Africa with Youth for Christ, embarked on this adventure in September when their former director contacted them about raising money for Sakhisizwe in the United States.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Sun Staff Writer | May 3, 1994
Roman Catholic Bishop John H. Ricard, back in Baltimore yesterday from a 12-day official visit to South Africa, was optimistic about a black-led government's ability to handle "challenges on a massive scale" in the new democracy.The substantial majority apparently won by Nelson Mandela's African National Congress "means there will be a government of national unity," the Baltimore auxiliary bishop said.But he did not discount "the enormous problems" in a nation whose wealth is concentrated in a small percentage of the population, and where unemployment is high, especially among young blacks.
NEWS
By Frank Greve and Frank Greve,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 1, 1990
WASHINGTON -- While many U.S. businesses are donating their products to GIs stuck in Saudi Arabia for the holidays, a widely promoted charity is charging hefty markups on goods that it ships to them.The drive, called "G.I. Gift Pac," promises to "make every effort" to deliver by Christmas what ads and telephone order takers describe as $15 worth of "cookies and candy, dried fruit, tasty nuts and other holiday treats." Contributors pay $15 for one box, $25 for two, $6 more for each delivery to an individual GI.The hugely successful project -- promoted heavily by ads on television and in newspapers, including The Sun -- already has 170,000 gift packs en route to the Persian Gulf by military sealift, according to the packager, Precise Kit Promotions Inc. of HoHoKus, N.J.But the question of who will benefit more from the project -- GIs or veteran charity entrepreneur Roger Chapin of San Diego and Falls Church, Va., the organizer of the campaign -- is hard to answer.
NEWS
February 22, 2003
GEORGE A. SCHOCK, JR., died on February 19, 2003, at the Maryland Masonic Homes, in Cockeysville, MD, lifelong resident and Fire Chief of Millville, NJ, builder of the battleship USS New Jersey, survived by his daughter, Rebecca Voneiff and son-in-law, John Voneiff, of Baltimore, MD; and four grandchildren: Dr. Elizabeth Voneiff and George A. Schock, IV, of Fort Collins, CO, and Deborah Schock and Michael Schock of Wilmington, DE. His wife of 56 years,...
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | September 11, 1997
PORT ELIZABETH, South Africa -- Twenty years ago this week, five police officers took black activist Steve Biko into a sixth-floor interrogation room of a nondescript building in the center of this industrial city.A half-hour later, Biko lay slumped against the wall, dazed from a blow to his head. Believing that Biko was feigning injury, the police chained him to an iron gate for the rest of the day.By the end of the week, Biko was dead and the anti-apartheid movement had gained its biggest martyr.
NEWS
By Lyn Backe and Lyn Backe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 10, 1997
AS THE MIDDLE ONE of three sisters, I have a lifetime's appreciation of the communication and learning that's inherent in sibling relationships.The same kind of learning and sharing is at the root of the popular international practice of sisterhood, not feminism, but community: sister cities, sister schools, sister ships.The Parole Rotary Club has a sister chapter in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, that has adopted a black school. The school, like other black schools in that country, had traditionally been given a low priority to receive textbooks and supplies.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | August 21, 1994
PORT ELIZABETH, South Africa -- The office that Necba Faku occupies in Port Elizabeth's city hall is bigger than the entire house he grew up in."Oh, much bigger," he tells visitors who have come to see South Africa's first black mayor.He is the mayor because this city has dared to take on one of the most complicated challenges in the country's transition to nonracial, democratic rule.Nelson Mandela is the country's president. A new national Parliament is dominated by members of his African National Congress.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Sun Staff Writer | May 3, 1994
Roman Catholic Bishop John H. Ricard, back in Baltimore yesterday from a 12-day official visit to South Africa, was optimistic about a black-led government's ability to handle "challenges on a massive scale" in the new democracy.The substantial majority apparently won by Nelson Mandela's African National Congress "means there will be a government of national unity," the Baltimore auxiliary bishop said.But he did not discount "the enormous problems" in a nation whose wealth is concentrated in a small percentage of the population, and where unemployment is high, especially among young blacks.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff writer | April 29, 1992
No one said starting a new ministry would be easy.But for Don and Judy Bixler, United States directors for the Sakhisizwe Christian Ministries, pursuing their dream of ministering to black South Africans is a step of faith they are willing to take each day."This is definitely something God worked out," Judy said of the fledgling ministry, which includes a multi-racial church in Kwazakheletownship and a school in Port Elizabeth. "We never could have done this through our own effort."The couple, who returned in January 1991 from a year's work on the east cape of South Africa with Youth for Christ, embarked on this adventure in September when their former director contacted them about raising money for Sakhisizwe in the United States.
NEWS
By Lyn Backe and Lyn Backe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 10, 1997
AS THE MIDDLE ONE of three sisters, I have a lifetime's appreciation of the communication and learning that's inherent in sibling relationships.The same kind of learning and sharing is at the root of the popular international practice of sisterhood, not feminism, but community: sister cities, sister schools, sister ships.The Parole Rotary Club has a sister chapter in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, that has adopted a black school. The school, like other black schools in that country, had traditionally been given a low priority to receive textbooks and supplies.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | April 30, 1991
PORT ELIZABETH, South Africa -- For Isaac Tembani, it is a matter of faith that his people will overcome their bitter experience with apartheid and return to the land they occupied before the South African government threw them off."The Bible says the truth is mighty and it prevails," said MrTembani, a soft-spoken man who often refers to his people's experience in biblical terms. "We're telling the truth. We're not making lies. That land was given to us. If we're telling the truth, then it must prevail."
NEWS
January 15, 1992
A new Sakhisizwe Christian Ministries of South Africa has been started here by Don Bixler, formerly director of development for HampsteadYouth for Christ.Bixler and his wife, Judy, were former missionaries with youth for Christ in South Africa in 1990, where they developed a love for the poor people of the black townships.In February 1990, Sakhisizwe Christian Ministries of Kwazakhele (a township near Port Elizabeth) was formed by Sicelo Duze, former executive director with Youth for Christ in Port Elizabeth and the Bixlers' boss.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | April 30, 1991
PORT ELIZABETH, South Africa -- For Isaac Tembani, it is a matter of faith that his people will overcome their bitter experience with apartheid and return to the land they occupied before the South African government threw them off."The Bible says the truth is mighty and it prevails," said MrTembani, a soft-spoken man who often refers to his people's experience in biblical terms. "We're telling the truth. We're not making lies. That land was given to us. If we're telling the truth, then it must prevail."
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