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By Los Angeles Times | February 4, 1994
MEXICO CITY -- The remains of a huge, ancient port city believed to have flourished for 500 years from 100 to 600 A.D. have been discovered on Mexico's Gulf Coast, the National Geographic Society reports.With more than 150 earthen pyramids and other buildings, the biggest 100 feet high, the port seems to have been North America's largest coastal city 1,500 years ago. The site, in the state of Veracruz, has been named El Pital for a nearby town.Although digging has not begun at the site, an examination of the surface has already yielded artifacts and information that establish the city's importance as a multiethnic political, commercial and agricultural center.
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NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 24, 2013
Port City Bass Anglers will be sponsoring the 9th annual Kid's Fishing Festival June 9 at Bynum Run Park on Churchville Road in Bel Air. At this event, junior anglers will participate in a tournament and have a fun day of fishing that will be split into two age groups from 5 years old through 15 years old. Registration will begin at 8 a.m. at the park entrance. The event will take place from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. Members of Port City will assist each youth in the competition. Prizes and trophies will be given out to the youth during and at the end of the event.
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NEWS
Lionel Foster | January 3, 2013
A few months ago, during my first trip to Houston, I did what anyone whose knowledge of Texas is defined almost entirely by movies and television might do. I bought cowboy boots from a man with a handlebar mustache, went to a honky tonk, got thrown off a mechanical bull and mastered the "Boot Scootin' Boogie. " If I hadn't gone back to Texas last week, this story might have ended right about there, but during my second trip, with my cowboy itch already thoroughly scratched, I paid closer attention.
NEWS
Lionel Foster | January 3, 2013
A few months ago, during my first trip to Houston, I did what anyone whose knowledge of Texas is defined almost entirely by movies and television might do. I bought cowboy boots from a man with a handlebar mustache, went to a honky tonk, got thrown off a mechanical bull and mastered the "Boot Scootin' Boogie. " If I hadn't gone back to Texas last week, this story might have ended right about there, but during my second trip, with my cowboy itch already thoroughly scratched, I paid closer attention.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
In the crisp autumn wind, as leaves fill gutters and darkness falls ever earlier on the Colonial-era streets of Maryland's capital city, ghost season arrives in Annapolis. "Dying trees, boy, that's the good stuff," folklorist Ed Okonowicz said. "Everything adds to the ambience. I'd rather do a graveyard tour in October than any other month of the year. " Annapolis is among his favorite haunts. The three-century-old city boasts enough bump-in-the-night tales to support two competing ghost tours and two books on the topic, both published within the past five years, the most recent one this fall.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,Sun Staff | January 23, 2000
Olav Rakkenes says he loves Baltimore, and does Baltimore ever love Olav Rakkenes. Mayor Martin O'Malley made the Norwegian businessman an honorary citizen of the city. State officials threw him a party at the top of the World Trade Center, and the governor came. With gifts. When Rakkenes visited Baltimore in December, he was something special -- the head of a successful, respected shipping line who considered the port of Baltimore a good place to do business. He signed up his shipping company, Atlantic Container Line, for the longest deal in the port of Baltimore's history -- a 10-year lease, worth $100 million.
NEWS
By M. SIGMUND SHAPIRO | September 18, 1991
In a recent speech to a French audience, Claude Abraham,president of CGM, a large French steamship and transport company, gave his audience a history lesson. Mr. Abraham, who spent a number of years as a professor, is an educator at heart. He maintains that maritime history is in the process of repeating itself. The port of Baltimore should take heed.His premise is persuasive. During the 1990s we will witness the swelling of one of those waves of international trade that have risen periodically over the centuries.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 24, 2013
Port City Bass Anglers will be sponsoring the 9th annual Kid's Fishing Festival June 9 at Bynum Run Park on Churchville Road in Bel Air. At this event, junior anglers will participate in a tournament and have a fun day of fishing that will be split into two age groups from 5 years old through 15 years old. Registration will begin at 8 a.m. at the park entrance. The event will take place from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. Members of Port City will assist each youth in the competition. Prizes and trophies will be given out to the youth during and at the end of the event.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 9, 1991
BRINDISI, Italy -- Fearing an epidemic among thousands of Albanian refugees sleeping in the open amid squalid dockside conditions at Brindisi, Italian police began rounding them up yesterday evening to move them into local schools for the night.The move appeared to be the first step in the Italian government's pledge earlier in the day to find temporary shelter for about 20,000 Albanians who have sailed on rickety boats and rusty ships across the Adriatic Sea to this and other Italian coastal towns in the last few days to seek work and refuge.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | April 14, 1995
Baltimore is looking for a few tall ships -- but the competition is pretty fierce.Naval officials in Uruguay say they will send a tall ship here July 2. But in what may be an off year for the popular attractions, most of the world's stately tall ships will be setting sails for port cities competing with Baltimore.So far, Uruguay's Capitan Miranda is the only tall ship scheduled to visit Baltimore this year. Typically, from two to six tall ships have visited the Inner Harbor each year since their initial invitation in 1976.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
In the crisp autumn wind, as leaves fill gutters and darkness falls ever earlier on the Colonial-era streets of Maryland's capital city, ghost season arrives in Annapolis. "Dying trees, boy, that's the good stuff," folklorist Ed Okonowicz said. "Everything adds to the ambience. I'd rather do a graveyard tour in October than any other month of the year. " Annapolis is among his favorite haunts. The three-century-old city boasts enough bump-in-the-night tales to support two competing ghost tours and two books on the topic, both published within the past five years, the most recent one this fall.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2005
Baltimore and its port will share about $1 million in security money from the Department of Homeland Security, agency officials said yesterday, although they couldn't immediately say where it would be used. The federal agency said yesterday that it had not yet notified the recipients, and only two of eight applications from the Baltimore area were funded. Only about a third of the $406 million in requests nationally were approved during this round of funding, Homeland Security's fifth since the 2001 terrorist attacks led to the department's creation.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 1, 2005
PORT ELIZABETH, South Africa - Anywhere but South Africa, rugby is just a sport, not a volatile indicator of relations between blacks and whites. The latest reminder that rugby is this nation's national obsession came last month when the South African Rugby Union decided against awarding a newly created team to Port Elizabeth, the struggling city on the Indian Ocean in the Eastern Cape, the region considered the heart of black South African rugby....
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2003
UMM QASR, Iraq - The hospital is mobbed. Mothers press inside the concrete structure with sons and daughters suffering from diarrhea, malnutrition, coughs and fevers. Men hobble about the lobby with crude crutches that Americans might recognize from Civil War photos. Outside, children who are thirsty and threadbare beg foreigners for water and dinars, the devalued Iraqi currency. The three doctors at this port city's only hospital have been working day and night to treat the daily influx of 800 to 1,000 people since war began three weeks ago. That is about triple the usual volume, and the doctors are weary from overwork, frustrated that they have had to turn some people away.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 16, 2003
UMM QASR, Iraq - Children begged for water, the schools remained closed and cranes in the once-busy port stood idle, but members of a newly formed town council stepped forward yesterday to declare a new era. "I would like to welcome you to liberated Iraq," Najim Abdul Madhi, a secondary school teacher, announced on the steps of a former hotel that has become an ad-hoc city hall. "It is a place you cannot forget anytime." There was no mistaking the irony of his words. Madhi spoke eloquently of Iraq as the cradle of civilization where "the first wheels turned," but he also wanted the United States and Great Britain to know that their work was just beginning.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 26, 2003
KUWAIT CITY - The southern Iraq port city of Umm Qasr was under the control of U.S. and British troops yesterday, military officials said, opening a key route for humanitarian aid that could begin arriving in about two days. If that news sounds familiar, it might be because Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld made the same announcement Friday. That turned out to be overly optimistic. Coalition forces continued to face lightly armed but exceptionally persistent members of the ragtag fedayeen, the zealous Iraqi militia that for nearly a decade has been the brutal force behind Saddam Hussein's fist.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 22, 1991
MALACCA, Malaysia -- The monsoon winds blew tall trading ships to Malacca for centuries, east from India and west from China, laden with silk and spice and the great cultures of the world.Muslims were the first to arrive, followed by the Chinese and then the Portuguese, who fell to the Dutch, who gave way to the British, who brought in the Indians.And so Malacca remains to this day a bowl of curry noodles and a mug of Guinness Stout, as interesting as one of its fabled antique shops on Jonker Street, unspoiled by the "progress" that has helped turn Kuala Lumpur and Singapore intoglass-and-steel boom towns searching for their souls.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2005
Baltimore and its port will share about $1 million in security money from the Department of Homeland Security, agency officials said yesterday, although they couldn't immediately say where it would be used. The federal agency said yesterday that it had not yet notified the recipients, and only two of eight applications from the Baltimore area were funded. Only about a third of the $406 million in requests nationally were approved during this round of funding, Homeland Security's fifth since the 2001 terrorist attacks led to the department's creation.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2003
Nearly lost in Baltimore's bountiful maritime history are the largely uncharted contributions of countless African-American craftsmen and laborers who hauled cargo, built and repaired ships and helped forge a seafaring capital out of a young port city. That will change next year, when an educational nonprofit group finishes restoring a rickety warehouse in Fells Point. Due to open in the fall of next year, the waterfront Frederick Douglass-Isaac Myers Maritime Park is jointly named for the Maryland-born abolitionist and the founder of the first black-owned shipyard in the nation.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2003
Nearly lost in Baltimore's bountiful maritime history are the largely uncharted contributions of countless African-American craftsmen and laborers who hauled cargo, built and repaired ships and helped forge a seafaring capital out of a young port city. That will change next year, when an educational nonprofit group finishes restoring a rickety warehouse in Fells Point. Due to open in the fall of next year, the waterfront Frederick Douglass-Isaac Myers Maritime Park is jointly named for the Maryland-born abolitionist and the founder of the first black-owned shipyard in the nation.
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