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NEWS
June 16, 2004
William George Bock Jr., a retired employee of the budget department of Maryland Port Authority, died of cancer Saturday at the ManorCare nursing home in Towson. The Cockeysville resident was 74. Born in Baltimore and raised on Winston Road in Northwood, Mr. Bock was a 1949 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. After high school, he began working in Baltimore for the state's Bureau of Vital Statistics. In 1949, Mr. Bock enlisted in the Navy and served in the Korean War. He was a radarman on the minesweeper USS Partridge off the coast of Korea.
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NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley is scheduled to begin a nine-day trip to Brazil and El Salvador on Monday. The governor will lead a trade mission that includes 30 businesses and leaders from Maryland's Port Authority, according to the his office. The state maintains about a dozen international trade offices, including one in Brazil. The Port of Baltimore receives more imports from Brazil than any other country, the governor's office said. "As Maryland's economy grows we must continue to forge new connections, partnerships and investments abroad," O'Malley said in a statement.
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NEWS
By KAREN FREIFELD and KAREN FREIFELD,NEWSDAY | October 27, 2005
NEW YORK -- A jury found the Port Authority negligent yesterday in the 1993 bombing of the World Trade Center, a long-awaited victory for victims of the terrorist attack that killed six people and injured more than 1,000 eight years before the Sept. 11 attack destroyed the buildings. The six-person jury in State Supreme Court found the Port Authority, the agency that owned the trade center, liable for not heeding the warnings of its security consultants about the dangers of such an attack in the public parking garage.
NEWS
By Helen Delich Bentley and Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
As The Sun 's maritime editor from 1949 to 1969, I was given a free hand to cover the shipping world as I saw fit. And in those days we believed our mission was not just to make certain that The Sun was the leader in maritime news but also to enhance and improve the status of the Port of Baltimore. The port community welcomed The Sun 's coverage, and my stories showed how the railroads' control resulted in the port's lagging behind New York, Philadelphia and even Norfolk.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 9, 2001
NEW YORK - The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey has moved to persuade Congress to help the agency accelerate the dredging of 240 miles of harbor channels to the 50-foot depths required for the increasing number of super-size cargo ships in the global commercial fleet. The speeded-up process approved by the commissioners of the bistate agency seeks to finish by 2009 rather than 2016 the projects intended to keep the port competitive. Congress used the 2016 date in December when it authorized the staged spending of $3.1 billion in federal and local dredging funds.
NEWS
By Randy Kennedy and Randy Kennedy,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 22, 2001
NEW YORK - Ever since it was completed in 1962, the graceful, soaring Trans World Airlines Flight Center at Kennedy International Airport has been described as a monument to the jet age. But the terminal - built by Eero Saarinen & Associates and designated a city landmark in 1994 - was actually designed before the introduction of large, commercial jets. And as air travel changed around it, the terminal quickly became a dazzling architectural relic. Now, as the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey tries to figure out how to fit the terminal into a $10 billion redevelopment of the airport, the agency has received approval from state officials to demolish large pieces of the complex: two satellite pods where passengers wait to enter jetways to their flights.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 29, 2003
NEW YORK - Until yesterday, when the Port Authority released its raw historical records from Sept. 11, 2001, the two men were remembered from glimpses as the north tower of the World Trade Center was heaving toward collapse. One was short, the other tall. They carried a crowbar, a flashlight and walkie-talkies. Beyond that, say some who survived that day, the smoke had blurred their faces and hair and clothes into gray. With their tools, the two men, Frank De Martini and Pablo Ortiz, an architect and a construction inspector, attacked the lethal web of obstacles that trapped people who had survived the impact of the plane but could not get to an exit.
NEWS
By Stephanie McCrummen and Stephanie McCrummen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 10, 2002
GARDEN CITY, N.Y. -- It is a Saturday afternoon in early November, and a man, a deliberate and rational man, sits at his kitchen table and writes a letter. The words come easily, the transcription of thoughts honed for weeks. "You don't know me, but I work for the Port Authority, and, like you, I live in Garden City. I didn't know your wife, but I saw her on the train ... "There is a strange sense of connection I feel ... and I can't escape that. " There had been so much more to say, it seemed, several weeks earlier, on the day the deaths of strangers had overwhelmed him, and, unexpectedly, her death in particular.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 30, 2002
NEW YORK - Twelve employees of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and five others were charged yesterday with filing false claims and stealing money meant for victims of the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, authorities said. All but one of the Port Authority employees were in the World Trade Center at the time of the attacks, but they escaped safely and suffered no financial hardship as a result, the Manhattan district attorney, Robert M. Morgenthau, said at a news conference yesterday.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 11, 2002
NEW YORK - To free more land at the World Trade Center site for open space and a memorial, city and state officials are discussing options that would reduce by nearly one-third the amount of office space that would have to be built to replace the 11 million square feet lost in the terrorist attacks. The possibilities include having the Lower Manhattan Development Corp. buy the severely damaged Deutsche Bank building and then trade that land to the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey for some of the 16-acre trade center site, the officials said yesterday, speaking on the condition of anonymity.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
The City's department of public works crews are repairing a broken 16-inch water main near the truck entrance to the Dundalk Marine Terminal, closing a section of Broening Highway Thursday, a spokesman said. The main broke late Thursday morning and might take until midnight to repair, closing down the northbound lanes of the 2700 block of Broening, said department spokesman Kurt Kocher, in an e-mail. The southbound lanes are now carrying two-way traffic, he said, and the Port Authority has made arrangements to get their vehicles in and out. He said water would be shut off until about 4 p.m., affecting portions of the Marine Terminal.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | February 17, 2007
A tentative deal was reached yesterday between the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and a Dubai company that has briefly run some U.S. port terminals, clearing the way for a sale that members of Congress demanded on national security grounds. DP World acquired some management contracts at marine terminals in New York, Baltimore and elsewhere last year but was forced to put them up for resale after an election-year fracas on Capitol Hill that centered on foreign ownership at U.S. ports.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | February 16, 2007
The Dubai company forced to exit U.S. ports over security concerns now says that its long-awaited deal to sell assets in Baltimore and elsewhere is in jeopardy because officials at the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey are demanding a multi-million payout to approve the transaction. In a letter to the authority yesterday, officials from DP World and American buyer AIG Global Investment Group accused the port of seeking an unwarranted $84 million fee, and "if the port authority continues with its unreasonable request, the sale will fail."
NEWS
October 19, 2006
The State Highway Administration will spend $6.8 million to design an improved interchange at the Beltway and Charles Street -- a move it says will add traffic capacity and create a more attractive gateway to Lutherville. The project will include replacement of the 51-year-old Charles Street Bridge with a wider span that will accommodate the addition of lanes to the Beltway, according to the agency. The state also announced it will spend $4.3 million to continue widening the west side of the Beltway by adding a fourth outer-loop lane between Ingleside Avenue and Frederick Road.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | July 1, 2006
By the early 1950s, with Baltimore's aging port facilities worn down from heavy use during World War II and with the neglect of the all-powerful railroads, it was clear that something had to be done. Maryland Gov. Theodore Roosevelt McKeldin, who had been critical of the lack of modern port development, was joined in this sentiment by Baltimore Mayor Thomas J. D'Alesandro Jr. At the time, the port was largely a bulk handler of coal, grain and ore, and it was in danger of losing its competitive edge.
NEWS
By STEVENSON SWANSON and STEVENSON SWANSON,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 21, 2006
NEW YORK -- The terrorists chose well. The Sept. 11 hijackers attacked the twin towers of the World Trade Center because they were symbols of American financial power. And, rising to nearly 1,400 feet, they were easy to hit. What the al-Qaida terrorists probably did not realize is that the 16-acre site where the towers stood also is one of the most complicated pieces of real estate in the United States. With its overlapping layers of authority and a daunting agenda of public and private functions to fulfill, the site has defied attempts at a speedy rebuilding, which Gov. George E. Pataki and others have insisted is vital to proving that America will not allow terrorism to prevail.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | July 1, 2006
By the early 1950s, with Baltimore's aging port facilities worn down from heavy use during World War II and with the neglect of the all-powerful railroads, it was clear that something had to be done. Maryland Gov. Theodore Roosevelt McKeldin, who had been critical of the lack of modern port development, was joined in this sentiment by Baltimore Mayor Thomas J. D'Alesandro Jr. At the time, the port was largely a bulk handler of coal, grain and ore, and it was in danger of losing its competitive edge.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1998
The Middle River Racing Association met with Pasadena business people yesterday to sell them on the soundness of their idea for a controversial race track on the Solley peninsula.Middle River spokesman Mike Alfinito told a group comprised largely of fans that the track would bring international clients and prestige to area businesses, and he urged them to get involved in a proposed citizens advisory committee, a group of 25 local residents who will meet monthly with developers to discuss the $100 million speedway.
BUSINESS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | February 14, 2006
Dubai Ports World, a state-owned international port operator, cleared its last major hurdle yesterday in acquiring a British company that helps run several U.S. terminals, including Baltimore's, the companies said yesterday. The acquisition of Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation Co., whose shareholders agreed yesterday to accept Dubai Ports World's offer of 3.9 billion pounds, or $6.8 billion, in cash, would create the world's third-largest port operator, with 51 terminals in 30 countries.
NEWS
By KAREN FREIFELD and KAREN FREIFELD,NEWSDAY | October 27, 2005
NEW YORK -- A jury found the Port Authority negligent yesterday in the 1993 bombing of the World Trade Center, a long-awaited victory for victims of the terrorist attack that killed six people and injured more than 1,000 eight years before the Sept. 11 attack destroyed the buildings. The six-person jury in State Supreme Court found the Port Authority, the agency that owned the trade center, liable for not heeding the warnings of its security consultants about the dangers of such an attack in the public parking garage.
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