Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPort
IN THE NEWS

Port

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 7, 2012
The Sun obituary about Dr. Mildred Otenasek (Nov. 26) failed to mention one very important civic contribution back in 1955 and 1956. Then-Gov. Theodore McKeldin included Dr. Otanesek on the committee to change the Port of Baltimore and make it more competitive with neighboring ports. Even though she then was the Democratic National Committeewoman, she never once played politics but stepped in full tilt to learn about the problem - how railroad ownership and control of Baltimore's port inhibited it from competing with the other East Coast ports - and she expended every effort to help establish a public agency to take over.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
Thomas L. Kitchner Jr., a recently retired Baltimore Sun employee who had worked previously at Westinghouse Electric Corp., died Sept. 21 at Maryland Shock Trauma Center of complications from a fall. He was 66. Thomas Leonard Kitchner Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised in Brooklyn Park. He graduated in 1966 from Merganthaler Technical-Vocational High School and enlisted in the Army in 1968. He served with an infantry unit and saw combat in Vietnam. He was discharged in 1968 and later earned an associate's degree from what is now the Community College of Baltimore County-Catonsville.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2013
With a little more than two weeks to go before a contract extension between East Coast and Gulf dockworkers and port operators expires, the federal mediator said Thursday that progress is being made toward a long-term settlement. George Cohen, director of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, said the International Longshoremen's Association representing 14,500 union members and United States Maritime Alliance, which represents 14 ports and shipping companies, met between Tuesday and Thursday, and have agreed "that the negotiations will continue under our auspices.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
A Japanese shipping line will pay a nearly $70 million fine after agreeing to plead guilty to fixing prices and rigging bids for services at the port of Baltimore, the Justice Department said Friday. Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha Ltd., or K-Line, is the latest ocean carrier charged in a massive antitrust investigation of companies that federal officials say have conspired to drive up international shipping prices. K-Line, which was charged in U.S. District Court in Baltimore on Friday, provides shipping services for roll-on, roll-off cargo — including cars, trucks and construction equipment — to and from the U.S. and elsewhere.
NEWS
March 4, 2014
The longshoremen's union had better be careful in its dispute with the Port of Baltimore, lest it end the need for the jobs it seeks to protect ( "Labor dispute a stubborn anchor on port business in Baltimore," March 1). As it is, the Port of Baltimore is open only five days a week, closed on holidays and at lunch. Any day of the week you can see ships sitting in the bay waiting to get into the Port and you can see trucks lined up on Broening Highway, waiting to load and/or unload.
NEWS
March 7, 2014
Letter writer Anita Heygster's claim that the Port of Baltimore is only open five days a week and closed on holidays is incorrect ( "Port union is hurting its members," March 4). The Port of Baltimore has one of the most flexible work schedules on the East Coast. Ship operations continue 24/7, with only six holidays a year when there is no work allowed. The only exception to that is for cruise ships, which work any day of the year. Ms. Heygster might want to check her facts before making such erroneous and misleading statements.
NEWS
August 24, 1992
A year ago, the Port of Baltimore was struggling to keep from sinking to the level of a "feeder" port. What had once been a major U.S. destination for world trade was turning into a secondary docking point. Yet even in the midst of a long recession, new officials started to turn things around.Instead of losing $5.5 million, as the port did last year, it is profitable again. Port director Adrian Teel slashed personnel, restyled management and rejuvenated the Maryland Port Administration. He impressed the private sector and union leaders by bringing them into the room when key decisions were made.
NEWS
December 5, 1990
Before a tentative agreement was reached yesterday over the two-day work stoppage by clerks of Local 953 of the International Longshoremen's Association at the Port of Baltimore, callers to The Evening Sun's SUNDIAL overwhelmingly felt the state should stay out of the dispute.The majority of the 1,392 callers (875, 63 percent) said Gov. William Donald Schaefer should not involve the state in the dispute, while 37 percent (517 callers) said the state should get involved.Sixty-five percent (896 callers)
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2010
The Port of Baltimore's public terminals handled 42,830 cars in October, a 25 percent boost from a year earlier and a record number for a single month, port officials said Wednesday. The previous record was set in March, when 38,053 cars came through the public docks. "These automobile numbers demonstrate that the Port of Baltimore is successfully weathering the storm that is the recent national economic downturn," Gov. Martin O'Malley said in a statement. "This is good news for the thousands of men and women that depend on the port-related jobs to support their families.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
Twenty-eight companies at the Port of Baltimore will be taking part in a job fair on May 18 at Canton Pier 13 as part of National Maritime Day observances. The free event will showcase the companies and careers at the public and private terminals and at the surrounding maritime industries. The fair will run from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sen. Barbara Mikulski will lead a wreath laying ceremony aboard the NS Savannah at 11 a.m. The pier is at 4601 Newgate St.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
A shipment of aluminum sheets from China had to be fumigated at the port of Baltimore this week after a snail species never seen locally before was spotted on the outside of a shipping container, according to U.S. Customs and Border Protection. The Acusta sp. snail species could have posed "a significant agriculture threat because they cause damage by feeding on agricultural and horticultural crops as well as native plants, thereby lowering crop yields and crop quality," CBP officials said Wednesday.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
A new five-year deal between the port of Baltimore and high-end automaker BMW will keep bringing an estimated $2.5 billion worth of vehicles through what is already the top auto import operation in the nation. Officials announced the extended partnership - and a large new BMW processing center at one of the port's terminals - at a waterfront gathering Thursday, saying the new facility will bolster Baltimore's dominance in the market, create 200 jobs and set the course for growth.
NEWS
September 2, 2014
The demise of the proposed inter-modal transportation hub in Morrell Park is a sad day for the Port of Baltimore and the many folks whose living depends on it. (I'm sure other East Coast ports are cheering.) Where was the leadership in Annapolis on this issue? The governor clearly wasn't interested - he was out campaigning somewhere for something. Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown? Obviously not interested either. Now, about Maryland being business-friendly? Help me to understand this.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Baltimore may lose hundreds of jobs, tens of millions of dollars in economic activity and half of the port's containerized cargo following the state's decision not to build a new rail cargo transfer facility in Morrell Park. State and port officials scrambled Friday to outline alternatives to shoring up Baltimore's place in the international shipping industry ahead of the widening of the Panama Canal and the anticipated growth in Asian container traffic on the East Coast. The rail facility was meant to bring Baltimore's limited freight capacity up to par with other East Coast ports by allowing CSX Transportation to stack truck-sized shipping containers two high on trains for more efficient transportation inland.
NEWS
August 29, 2014
While this week's decision to abandon the proposed $95 million intermodal rail facility at the Mount Clare yard in Southwest Baltimore may be regarded as a big victory for neighbors in Morrell Park and elsewhere who strongly opposed it, the decision is a genuine setback for efforts to expand business at the Port of Baltimore. Hundreds of millions of dollars have been invested in recent years to make the port more competitive and reduce shipping costs; the loss of the planned intermodal facility is likely to have the opposite effect.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
State officials have abandoned plans for a rail cargo facility in an economically depressed corner of West Baltimore, amid vocal opposition from residents and diminishing political will. With the state withdrawing more than $30 million in funding, the CSX Transportation facility envisioned for the city's Morrell Park neighborhood will not be built, Maryland Transportation Secretary James T. Smith said Thursday. CSX and the port of Baltimore had been counting on using the facility to help move additional cargo.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2012
The Port of Baltimore's public terminals set new marks last year in the handling of vehicles, containers and wood pulp while also posting a strong showing in the areas of general cargo and farm and construction machinery. The figures, released Thursday, indicate that the port has rebounded from the economic slump, Gov. Martin O'Malley said. Port workers processed 612,480 auto imports and exports in 2011 and more than a half-million tons of wood pulp, both records. Container traffic was up 4 percent from 2010, and roll-on/roll-off volume increased 51 percent.
NEWS
March 3, 2014
The Port of Baltimore sits on the cusp of major advancements. This year marks the highly anticipated completion of an eight-year project to widen the Panama Canal, which is expected to bring a major boost in cargo shipments to Baltimore, one of only two East Coast ports capable of handling the larger ships that will soon be passing through. After visiting the canal last year, Vice President Joe Biden announced that the project could double the 100,000 jobs already supported by Baltimore's port.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Kamel Mahadin visited Baltimore 30 years ago as a graduate student studying landscape architecture at Louisiana State University. He returned Wednesday as the head of an ambitious, multibillion-dollar effort to build out Jordan's lone waterfront city into a tourist hub and expanded port. "Thirty years ago, when I visited … this was a slum area," said Mahadin, chief commissioner of the Aqaba Special Economic Zone Authority. "Why Baltimore? It's a waterfront development. … We want to see success story.
NEWS
June 11, 2014
On the last weekend in May, Prost German Restaurant, at 1195 Jacob Tome Highway, held its 3rd Annual Spring Fest complete with big tent in the back, vendors, games and, naturally, lots of authentic German food. Visitors on Friday and Saturday enjoyed live German music, activities for the kids and plenty of food and fun. Much sympathy is extended to the family of Eugene Boyd of Perryville, as he passed away June 3 from congestive heart failure. Condolences are sent to his wife and five sons and all their families.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.