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NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,Ocean City Bureau of The Sun | May 8, 1994
The baby harbor porpoise that washed ashore Thursday in Ocean City has been destroyed because of the severity of its injuries, National Aquarium officials said yesterday.The porpoise, thought to be a female less than 6 months old, was suffering from 10 broken ribs, internal bleeding and organ damage and had little hope of recovery, said Vicki Aversa, the aquarium's public relations director.The porpoise was destroyed Friday night with the same kind of injection used for dogs and cats, Ms. Aversa said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1999
It was dark outside when David Schofield arose in his Canton townhouse. He turned off two alarm clocks set for 4 a.m. and pulled on a blue T-shirt and shorts while a pot of coffee brewed. He hated the taste, but he gulped an oversized mug and refilled it. After months of painstaking work, the scientist was about to cede control to nature's unpredictable will. All he could do now was be on time and be alert. He drove quickly through Baltimore's quiet streets and parked by a back entrance to the National Aquarium.
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NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | April 30, 1996
A year after she was discovered foundering near death in a tributary of Delaware Bay, a gritty harbor porpoise that was nursed back to health at the National Aquarium in Baltimore was released yesterday 30 miles off the coast of Ocean City.After the porpoise was gently lowered onto a canopy after her ride out to sea on a Coast Guard vessel, David Schofield, director of the aquarium's Marine Animal Rescue Program, held her in the seawater to acclimate her to the temperature. On a nearby boat, about a dozen members of the MARP stood by in wet suits in case the porpoise showed signs of distress.
NEWS
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1999
GLOUCESTER, MASS. -- Five months ago, the baby harbor porpoise's future was bleak. Separated from his mother, emaciated and near death, the young porpoise was about to be euthanized on the Cape Cod, Mass., coast where he had been stranded.At the last minute, a telephone rang at the National Aquarium: Could experts in Baltimore help the animal?The answer appeared to be a resounding "yes" yesterday morning, as a rehabilitation team of aquarium staff and volunteers released the newly plump, vigorously wiggling porpoise back into the Atlantic Ocean.
NEWS
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1999
GLOUCESTER, MASS. -- Five months ago, the baby harbor porpoise's future was bleak. Separated from his mother, emaciated and near death, the young porpoise was about to be euthanized on the Cape Cod, Mass., coast where he had been stranded.At the last minute, a telephone rang at the National Aquarium: Could experts in Baltimore help the animal?The answer appeared to be a resounding "yes" yesterday morning, as a rehabilitation team of aquarium staff and volunteers released the newly plump, vigorously wiggling porpoise back into the Atlantic Ocean.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1999
It was dark outside when David Schofield arose in his Canton townhouse. He turned off two alarm clocks set for 4 a.m. and pulled on a blue T-shirt and shorts while a pot of coffee brewed. He hated the taste, but he gulped an oversized mug and refilled it. After months of painstaking work, the scientist was about to cede control to nature's unpredictable will. All he could do now was be on time and be alert. He drove quickly through Baltimore's quiet streets and parked by a back entrance to the National Aquarium.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,Ocean City Bureau of The Sun | May 6, 1994
OCEAN CITY -- A baby harbor porpoise that washed ashore early yesterday was rescued by residents and flown by Coast Guard helicopter to the National Aquarium in Baltimore, where it was in critical condition last night.The injured porpoise, which is estimated to be between 3 months and 5 months old, was found stranded on the beach by a sanitation worker, and several nearby residents came to its aid."I looked out my front window and saw it laying there, flopping around," said John Rehak who, with a friend, Stacy London, stayed with the porpoise while police were summoned.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1999
Marine scientists are mystified by an apparent spate of deaths among harbor porpoises, with the gregarious mammals' carcasses turning up in record numbers along East Coast beaches, including Maryland's.Through mid-April, at least 162 of the small, coast-hugging porpoises were washed ashore, dead or dying, between their wintering spots in North Carolina and their summer grounds in Maine. The number of reported deaths is more than triple last year's 51, and well above the previous record of 103 harbor porpoise deaths reported in 1977.
FEATURES
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | March 3, 2006
DOOGAL Rating -- G. What it's about -- Strange pals from the Magic Roundabout set out to find three diamonds to save the world from ice and the voice of Jon Stewart. The Kid Attractor Factor -- It's animated. Barely. Good lessons/bad lessons -- Friends stick together, and Sir Ian McKellan really ought to be pickier about what he agrees to do voice-overs for. Violence -- Freeze-rays, and the like. Language -- Clean. Sex -- None. Drugs -- Hmmm, none. Probably. Parents advisory -- American kids don't know the ancient Anglo-French TV show this came from, so they may be a bit lost and a lot bored by this piffle.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1996
Jet Blast Corp., the Baltimore company that uses water pressure for everything from cleaning cars to unclogging drains, said yesterday that it won a new packaging award at the National Hardware Show last week in Chicago.Jet Blast's Home Drain Care Kit includes three sizes of the Drain Blaster, a product that uses rotating water jets to clear drains without chemicals.The new package features a porpoise, inspired by the National Aquarium's use of another Jet Blast product, Pro Jet, as a toy for porpoises, said spokesman Dan Frantz.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1999
Marine scientists are mystified by an apparent spate of deaths among harbor porpoises, with the gregarious mammals' carcasses turning up in record numbers along East Coast beaches, including Maryland's.Through mid-April, at least 162 of the small, coast-hugging porpoises were washed ashore, dead or dying, between their wintering spots in North Carolina and their summer grounds in Maine. The number of reported deaths is more than triple last year's 51, and well above the previous record of 103 harbor porpoise deaths reported in 1977.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | April 30, 1996
A year after she was discovered foundering near death in a tributary of Delaware Bay, a gritty harbor porpoise that was nursed back to health at the National Aquarium in Baltimore was released yesterday 30 miles off the coast of Ocean City.After the porpoise was gently lowered onto a canopy after her ride out to sea on a Coast Guard vessel, David Schofield, director of the aquarium's Marine Animal Rescue Program, held her in the seawater to acclimate her to the temperature. On a nearby boat, about a dozen members of the MARP stood by in wet suits in case the porpoise showed signs of distress.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,Ocean City Bureau of The Sun | May 8, 1994
The baby harbor porpoise that washed ashore Thursday in Ocean City has been destroyed because of the severity of its injuries, National Aquarium officials said yesterday.The porpoise, thought to be a female less than 6 months old, was suffering from 10 broken ribs, internal bleeding and organ damage and had little hope of recovery, said Vicki Aversa, the aquarium's public relations director.The porpoise was destroyed Friday night with the same kind of injection used for dogs and cats, Ms. Aversa said.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,Ocean City Bureau of The Sun | May 6, 1994
OCEAN CITY -- A baby harbor porpoise that washed ashore early yesterday was rescued by residents and flown by Coast Guard helicopter to the National Aquarium in Baltimore, where it was in critical condition last night.The injured porpoise, which is estimated to be between 3 months and 5 months old, was found stranded on the beach by a sanitation worker, and several nearby residents came to its aid."I looked out my front window and saw it laying there, flopping around," said John Rehak who, with a friend, Stacy London, stayed with the porpoise while police were summoned.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | May 7, 1995
The Jarvis family pulled into a Shady Side marina on a sinking boat one summer afternoon two years ago, planning only to repair the vessel and move on. But they settled down, winning customers with their shipbuilding talents and charming a town with their quirky ways.Then one brisk night in November, the family vanished. It wasn't until federal agents stormed the boat hours later that residents learned their friendly neighbors were wanted, suspected of cultivating up to $20 million worth of marijuana on a farm in West Virginia for nearly a decade.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey MOVIES 'A Few Good Men' | December 12, 1992
ARTA process of becomingLike his other work, Joel Fisher's new sculptures are about becoming -- in the physical and the abstract sense. Made of plaster on an armature and attached to the wall, the sculptures look like creatures (an elephant, a porpoise) or extensions of the architecture that are springing into being right out of the wall itself. There's reference to alchemy -- transforming one substance into another -- and to the nature of creativity. These and Fisher's bronzes and drawings in this show afford a look in depth of this internationally recognized artist.
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