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By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 12, 1994
Like most households we have more chicken than beef dinners, and we cut back on protein portions by serving pasta or rice with everything. But occasionally I have to contend with a fowl revolt: my spouse is ready for meat.Then I choose a small pork tenderloin that yields two servings with no tempting leftovers.Pork tenderloin has the satisfying mouth appeal of a beef tenderloin, with about half the fat. When craving meat, fat is hardly an issue, however; flavor is. And pork tenderloin is a wonderful, juicy meat that is excellent in a variety of preparations.
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November 15, 2012
Victoria Gastro Pub Executive Chef Joe Krywucki reflects: Seasonal cooking is always best, especially when you have access to high quality ingredients. We use an all-natural Duroc pork, which has a superior flavor and tenderness, and local Baugher's Farm Honey Crisp apples. Pork Tenderloin 1.    Season the pork tenderloin with salt and pepper. 2.    Pan sear the pork in clarified butter until golden brown. 3.    Roast in oven at 350 degrees F until desired temperature.
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EXPLORE
November 15, 2012
Victoria Gastro Pub Executive Chef Joe Krywucki reflects: Seasonal cooking is always best, especially when you have access to high quality ingredients. We use an all-natural Duroc pork, which has a superior flavor and tenderness, and local Baugher's Farm Honey Crisp apples. Pork Tenderloin 1.    Season the pork tenderloin with salt and pepper. 2.    Pan sear the pork in clarified butter until golden brown. 3.    Roast in oven at 350 degrees F until desired temperature.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | January 3, 2012
Just because the holidays are over and we're into a new year, that doesn't mean the need for "roast beast" is over. Hearty winter dinners are still the order of the evening, but cold weather eating doesn't have to be all about stews and soups. You can serve up some easy (and relatively quick) meals with a bit of finesse, using pork tenderloin and coordinating it with whatever flavoring elements you decide to add. Pork tenderloin is a tempting entree item since it's generally lean and mild, is easy and quick to fix and with planovers in mind, it can star in later weekday dinners, like stir-fries, quick pasta or hot sandwiches.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | January 2, 1991
Pork hasn't been a member of the restaurant menu hit parade during the past few years. As fat and cholesterol-conscious Americans turned away from beef and pork and toward chicken and fish, pork became a rarity on restaurant menus.But even the skeptics, who say many pork cuts are still too fat for a prudent diet, now agree that roasted, boneless, trimmed pork tenderloin is comparable to roasted, boneless and skinless chicken breasts. A 3-ounce serving of chicken has 140 calories, 3 grams fat, 0.9 grams saturated fat and 72 milligrams cholesterol.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | October 14, 2009
It isn't easy to love or cook pork tenderloin. But recently I did both. Long and lean, the tenderloin has little fat, the stuff that makes most pork dishes succulent and makes many pig eaters weep for joy. Moreover, this piece of pork is not loaded with flavor and is often overcooked, facts of tenderloin life that even its admirers admit. "If you braise it, it is going to dry out on you," said Bruce Aidells, who has written a 2004 paean to the pig, "Bruce Aidells' Complete Book of Pork."
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | September 1, 2002
While working and living in Paris earlier in the summer, I pored over French cookbooks and culinary magazines, marking many pages that featured recipes I wanted to try. Of the many tantalizing dishes, one in particular -- grilled brochettes of magrets de canard and prunes -- stood out. I didn't get a chance to try it during our stay but dutifully brought the instructions home with me. In France, I would have had no trouble buying duck breasts, or magrets,...
FEATURES
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 11, 1999
During the summer, you can increase your intake of fresh fruits and vegetables, add more color to your dinner plate and save calories if you use homemade salsas and relishes as the base for accompaniment to grilled meats.This may sound like a lot of work, but if you can chop a tomato, peach or red pepper and add a few seasonings, you can make a zesty accompaniment for a piece of grilled pork or beef at a fraction of the calories of a butter or cream sauce.Both savory and sweet flavor combinations work.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | March 5, 2000
During the winter months, I rarely plan large parties or open houses. Instead, I prefer to have small dinners for four to eight people. The reason for this is simple. Where we live in New England, winters can be harsh, and the best-laid plans must be put aside when heavy snows or icy storms come our way. For me, it's much easier to call a small group than to have to contact 30 or 40 friends when the weather plays havoc with my entertaining and events have to be canceled. The past few days have brought snow, ice, sleet and sub-zero temperatures to our area, but I am hopeful that this weekend will be clear, so I am going to ask another couple to come for a casual supper at our house.
FEATURES
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | May 19, 1999
You can make a great meal faster than you can pick up dinner at a Chinese carryout.But if that's not enough to convince you to get into the kitchen, how about a stronger argument? You can make a great meal that is cheaper, quicker and probably more healthful than one you buy.Since you're no doubt convinced, here's the menu: Cucumber and Arugula Salad and Noodles With Baby Bok Choy and Pork Tenderloin. The recipes serve two, but feel free to double or triple them for your needs.First, make the salad, a combination of delicately flavored cucumber and zesty arugula.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2010
Cheryl Woodward from Baltimore was searching for a recipe she had misplaced for making stuffed pork loin. She does not remember the exact ingredients but she does recall that it had Swiss cheese and rosemary in the stuffing. Josie Englund from Wilmington, DE, sent in a recipe she thinks might be close to Woodward's original. She says that this stuffed pork tenderloin is one of those dishes that is relatively easy to prepare, tastes delicious and looks impressive. She says she makes it frequently for company.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | October 14, 2009
It isn't easy to love or cook pork tenderloin. But recently I did both. Long and lean, the tenderloin has little fat, the stuff that makes most pork dishes succulent and makes many pig eaters weep for joy. Moreover, this piece of pork is not loaded with flavor and is often overcooked, facts of tenderloin life that even its admirers admit. "If you braise it, it is going to dry out on you," said Bruce Aidells, who has written a 2004 paean to the pig, "Bruce Aidells' Complete Book of Pork."
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | February 27, 2008
Ruth Rhymaun is a good cook. The busy Bel Air wife and mother of two knows the terms, she has the knife skills, and she routinely turns out pasta, soup, burgers and Shepherd's Pie for dinner. Problem is, it's become too routine. She uses the same 10 ingredients over and over as the base for many meals, and knows her husband Martin, 4-year-old Willow and 3-year-old Lucas would like to try some new foods. So Rhymaun volunteered for The Sun's Make Over My Meal series. She wanted some new ingredients that would be easy to keep in the house and spin into new meals.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,Sun Reporter | February 21, 2007
When we first heard about Maggie Smith's situation, it didn't seem as serious as some we've dealt with in The Sun's monthly Make Over My Meal series. Boy, were we wrong. The 32-year-old working mother of two does a good job of getting a meal on the table every night in spite of a lengthy commute from Owings Mills to her home in Frankford. Usually the family has dinner together, and everyone pretty much eats the same thing. While 4-year-old Melina and 2-year-old Myles aren't great eaters, they enjoy some fruits; and Smith makes sure they drink lots of milk.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | January 31, 2007
Like a lot of Baltimore Ravens fans, part of me would just as soon forget about this Sunday's Super Bowl. It will be hard to watch the televised game without feeling our team "coulda, shoulda" been there. Yet we have to accept that the Ravens got beat, 15-6, by the Indianapolis Colts, the team that is favored over the Chicago Bears to win this year's Super Bowl title. Maybe this weekend will be easier to swallow if we give ourselves a pity party this Sunday, fixing comfort foods that will help us through this difficult time.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | July 12, 2006
If you can't get away to the Mediterranean this summer, a new restaurant in Annapolis is bringing it to you. Kyma is all about Mediterranean cuisine, with some cool, breezy digs to match. Spokeswoman Victoria Caplick says the restaurant is a joint venture between the Sfakiynudis family of Annapolis - who owns the 200-year-old building - and Jack Boyle of Mie N Yu in Georgetown. Let's start with the environs. Caplick said the owners wanted to combine old and new. So you'll see some exposed brick walls interspersed with sleek white surfaces and cobalt-blue tile.
NEWS
By DONNA PIERCE and DONNA PIERCE,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 16, 2005
My favorite autumn tradition has nothing to do with falling leaves or bonfires. I look forward to sweater weather because it means my sister's friend, Anthony, returns from his annual visit to his family home in southern Illinois. When Anthony returns with jams, jellies, pickles and preserves, from his family's tradition of "putting the harvest away," I can count on a large jar of his aunt's homemade blackberry preserves. I reserve most of the jar to use as a weekend breakfast spread.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | June 15, 1994
For those of you who're trying to stick to a low-fat diet, but have tired of fish and chicken, how about pork? Pork can be lean and very low in fat. In fact, pork tenderloin, trimmed of any fat, has only 21 percent of its calories from fat. You must, however, be wise about the cut of pork you choose. The tenderloin or the loin have the lowest fat. Always trim any visible fat.Aside from the savings in fat, a bonus to pork is the short cooking time -- about 15 minutes.Heat the grill first and put a large sauce pan half filled with salted water on to boil over high heat.
NEWS
By DONNA PIERCE and DONNA PIERCE,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 16, 2005
My favorite autumn tradition has nothing to do with falling leaves or bonfires. I look forward to sweater weather because it means my sister's friend, Anthony, returns from his annual visit to his family home in southern Illinois. When Anthony returns with jams, jellies, pickles and preserves, from his family's tradition of "putting the harvest away," I can count on a large jar of his aunt's homemade blackberry preserves. I reserve most of the jar to use as a weekend breakfast spread.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN FOOD EDITOR | May 11, 2005
Some folks may argue with Dana Jacobi's choices of the 12 most beneficial foods, but because chocolate makes the list, I won't be one of them. The goal of the 12 Best Foods Cookbook (Rodale, 2005, $21.95) is to give readers recipes that feature those super foods that scientists tell us have health benefits because of their nutrients and antioxidants. This dynamic dozen includes: blueberries, black beans, broccoli, chocolate, oatmeal, onions, salmon, soy, spinach, sweet potatoes, tomatoes and walnuts.
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