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By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 19, 2005
I am a simple fool for barbecue. So, I was pleased to hear about Kloby's Backyard Barbeque in Woodlawn. Kloby's has been open for about seven months in a small shopping plaza not far from Security Square Mall. And I wish it nothing but smoke-filled success, as one can never have too many good barbecue joints. On a recent visit, neon beckoned from the front window; inside, wooden picnic tables gave the small seating area something of a backyard feel. A row of plants lined one side of the kitchen; banners for the Ravens, Orioles and Terps hung above.
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TRAVEL
By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2011
To Kenny Callaghan, barbecue is like religion. "If you're Roman Catholic, you don't go to a synagogue," said Callaghan, the executive chef and barbecue czar at New York's Blue Smoke restaurant. "If you're from North Carolina, you don't understand what Memphis barbecue is. " As barbecue lovers know, different regions of the U.S. cherish their distinctive barbecue traditions, and Blue Smoke is famous for bringing those traditions together on its menu. In 2002, to help the various barbecue factions gain an appreciation for each other, Callaghan invited five renowned smokers and slatherers from around the country to showcase the best of their respective regions.
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NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 10, 2005
I may be intruding on a nice little neighborhood secret, but I feel it's my duty to tell folks that there's a yummy luau going down five days a week in Timonium. The Ono Grill is nothing fancy - just terrific Hawaiian-style barbecue served out of a little shack sitting behind Jay's Shave Ice on York Road. It's the kind of place you'd expect to find, if you're lucky, at the end of a dirt road near a beach on Oahu. Jay's has been dishing out shave ice (the Hawaiian name for snowballs), ice cream and coffee drinks for a while.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | June 17, 2009
This Father's Day, think about serving Dad a beer at breakfast, or as a lunch entree, or maybe during dessert. I am not proposing you get dear old Dad soused this Sunday. Rather, I am suggesting you feed him dishes made with beer. Why is this a good idea? First, dads like to eat. Secondly, most dads like beer. Thirdly, it is usually difficult to figure out what to get the guy for Father's Day. He doesn't give his relatives many gift clues. What he really values, of course, is recognition, some acknowledgment of his paternal role, some effort that says, "Thanks, man."
FEATURES
By Pat Dailey and Pat Dailey,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 24, 1996
The wood flavors imparted through smoking vary, and traditions and preferences have developed that match wood with the food: Salmon with alder, bacon with applewood, pork with hickory are among the matches that set lips smacking.Bill Jamison, co-author of "Sublime Smoke," suggests that there's a little bit of hyperbole in such partnerships."Unless you're pit-smoking for 6 or 8 hours, you probably won't taste the difference," he suggests.Others would counter that with a suggestion: Find out for yourself.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 26, 2002
There are two things I like to see outside a barbecue restaurant: a pile of wood in the back and a big ol' pig on the roof. Andy Nelson's Southern Pit Barbecue in Cockeysville has them both. Inside the restaurant, the waiting area has a laid-back feel and features red and black checkerboard tiles, a ceiling fan and a pig motif. (There's something to be said for celebrating the thing you're about to eat, I suppose.) There are also clippings about Nelson's career as a Baltimore Colt, and a notice about the restaurant from the National BBQ News.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 10, 2003
Woodlawn, I'm discovering, holds many culinary surprises. Add to the list the Salsa Grill, an unpretentious and friendly restaurant that offers interesting Peruvian, Caribbean and Cuban dishes. In a strip mall next to a tax-preparation outlet, Salsa Grill's narrow space is dominated by a long open kitchen. Posters touting various kinds of peppers serve as the main decoration. We grabbed a booth near the kitchen and wolfed down an order of nothing-special chips and salsa ($4) while our order was prepared.
FEATURES
By D. and B. White | April 10, 1993
The Bridge Cafe6 North Park Drive, Cockeysville. Hours: Mon.-Fri. 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. (410) 584-8657. Nestled in the center of an office park just north of the northeast corner of York and Shawan roads is a cafeteria-carryout that specializes in homemade food. Marvin and Leslie Wies have been cooking up breakfasts and lunches for about two years. There are no signs to the Bridge Cafe, but if you get as far as the ground floor lobby of Building 6 (Park Center) you have reached the cheerfully decorated room with full-length windows that look out on a lawn with a patio where diners can take their food and sit under a white pergola, weather permitting.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | July 8, 1998
Most cooks have a dish they regard as their specialty. It is a dish requested by family members and friends. It is a dish that, by the end of the meal, has eaters patting their stomachs with pleasure and stroking the cook's ego with compliments.For years, my signature dish has been barbecued pork ribs. marinate the ribs in Wicker's, a vinegar-based sauce I import from a small town in Missouri. Whenever my kids heard that "Dad's ribs" were being served for supper, they used to high-tail it to the table.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | February 17, 2002
AS HAPPENS when you have a lot of spare time on your hands, I performed an aberrant act last weekend. I boiled some spare ribs. There were not very many ribs - just three pairs cut in 3--inch lengths. And there was not much water involved - about half a cup. Nonetheless, the very act of putting pork ribs in water seemed like anathema to me. It has been an article of faith that pork ribs should be cooked on the barbecue grill, or in a smoker, over a low, slow fire. The other day as I stood at the stove and watched the water bubble around the meat, I could hear the admonitions ringing in my ears from Rick Catalano, proprietor of Cafe Tattoo on Belair Road in Northeast Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | June 7, 2008
Virginia Willis is a cook whose life story I can easily relate to. She was brought up in Atlanta and is a life-long devotee of Southern cuisine, but after studying and cooking in France, she also became enchanted with French food. I grew up in Memphis, and to this day make grits for breakfast, bake corn bread almost weekly, and serve crispy fried okra often. And, yes, I too was seduced by la cuisine francaise after studying in Paris while in college. Imagine, then, my delight when I discovered Virginia's new cookbook, Bon Appetit, Y'all, a collection in which the author combines her Southern heritage with her French training.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | December 19, 2007
In the deepening dusk of a chilly Sunday, I was drawn to a crackling fire. The flames came not from a fireplace, a traditional source of winter warmth, but from my backyard kettle cooker. It was not ideal weather for outdoor activity; the temperature hovered in the 40s and rain loomed on the horizon. But a griller has gotta do what a griller has gotta do, and I had some skewers of meat and vegetables that needed the kind of searing that only a hot, outdoor fire could produce. Moreover, like a moth is drawn to the flame, I was drawn toward the embers by the allure of grilling in December.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | June 7, 2006
Ribs are the original hand-held food. They are portable; you can walk around surveying your domain as you gnaw on a bone. They feel good in your hand, creating a primal balance, especially if you have a cold beverage in your opposing hand. And when done right, they taste outasight. To paraphrase Professor Harold Hill of The Music Man, I consider the hours I spend with a rib in my hand to be golden. Until recently, most of my rib reveries came courtesy of pigs. Pork spareribs, those big boys cooked low and slow over a hickory fire, have been the centerpiece of many memorable feeds.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | October 5, 2005
In case you're wondering what restaurant themes - other than steakhouses - seem to be hot around Baltimore these days, barbecue would have to be included in the top five. You've got the fairly new Ray Lewis eatery in Canton, plans by former Blue Agave owner Michael Marx to open barbecue joints in Timonium and Locust Point, and now the new Mr. Chelsea's Bar-B-Q in Owings Mills. The guy behind the smoker is Keith Henze, the owner of Garrison Catering, whose major business is providing lunch programs for private schools and colleges.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 10, 2005
I may be intruding on a nice little neighborhood secret, but I feel it's my duty to tell folks that there's a yummy luau going down five days a week in Timonium. The Ono Grill is nothing fancy - just terrific Hawaiian-style barbecue served out of a little shack sitting behind Jay's Shave Ice on York Road. It's the kind of place you'd expect to find, if you're lucky, at the end of a dirt road near a beach on Oahu. Jay's has been dishing out shave ice (the Hawaiian name for snowballs), ice cream and coffee drinks for a while.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 19, 2005
I am a simple fool for barbecue. So, I was pleased to hear about Kloby's Backyard Barbeque in Woodlawn. Kloby's has been open for about seven months in a small shopping plaza not far from Security Square Mall. And I wish it nothing but smoke-filled success, as one can never have too many good barbecue joints. On a recent visit, neon beckoned from the front window; inside, wooden picnic tables gave the small seating area something of a backyard feel. A row of plants lined one side of the kitchen; banners for the Ravens, Orioles and Terps hung above.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | November 8, 1992
As an eater, President-elect Bill Clinton is a man who "likes most anything." He is a guy who can so passionately pursue the corn bread, the baked chicken and the chess pie, that from time to time his wife "has to kinda quiet him down."So says Liza Ashley, who cooked for Clinton and his family at the governor's mansion in Little Rock.In a friendly, half-hour telephone conversation conducted the day after the election, Ms. Ashley, 75, talked about thepresident-elect's eating habits and those of the Clinton family.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | June 7, 2006
Ribs are the original hand-held food. They are portable; you can walk around surveying your domain as you gnaw on a bone. They feel good in your hand, creating a primal balance, especially if you have a cold beverage in your opposing hand. And when done right, they taste outasight. To paraphrase Professor Harold Hill of The Music Man, I consider the hours I spend with a rib in my hand to be golden. Until recently, most of my rib reveries came courtesy of pigs. Pork spareribs, those big boys cooked low and slow over a hickory fire, have been the centerpiece of many memorable feeds.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 10, 2003
Woodlawn, I'm discovering, holds many culinary surprises. Add to the list the Salsa Grill, an unpretentious and friendly restaurant that offers interesting Peruvian, Caribbean and Cuban dishes. In a strip mall next to a tax-preparation outlet, Salsa Grill's narrow space is dominated by a long open kitchen. Posters touting various kinds of peppers serve as the main decoration. We grabbed a booth near the kitchen and wolfed down an order of nothing-special chips and salsa ($4) while our order was prepared.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 19, 2003
The best line in My Big Fat Greek Wedding comes when it's revealed that the groom-to-be doesn't eat meat. "What do you mean, you don't eat no meat? ... That's OK. I'll make lamb," says Aunt Voula. Somehow that line came back to me as I ventured into the Meat Rack in Catonsville - kind of a poor man's version of the Prime Rib. The Meat Rack occupies a little red wooden building behind the Tastee Zone ice-cream stand not far outside the Beltway on Edmondson Avenue. A sign beckons with "Home Cooking at its Finest," and the aroma of roasting flesh fills the air in the somewhat cramped parking lot. But I'm a carnivore and I like that smell.
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