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Pork Loin

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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2010
Cheryl Woodward from Baltimore was searching for a recipe she had misplaced for making stuffed pork loin. She does not remember the exact ingredients but she does recall that it had Swiss cheese and rosemary in the stuffing. Josie Englund from Wilmington, DE, sent in a recipe she thinks might be close to Woodward's original. She says that this stuffed pork tenderloin is one of those dishes that is relatively easy to prepare, tastes delicious and looks impressive. She says she makes it frequently for company.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
Range, Bryan Voltaggio's fourth restaurant, is a triumph of style in harmony with substance. Dinner at Range, which will last for hours but feel like minutes, is wall-to-wall pleasure, from the first hand-crafted cocktail to the last bonbon from the in-house chocolatier. There's a lot going on, and Range is as big as its name. The restaurant, open seven days a week for lunch and dinner, occupies the top level of the newly renovated retail atrium inside the Chevy Chase Pavilion.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2011
Movies and crepes go together. The original Sofi's Crepes is still running next to The Charles, now a new Sofi's has opened directly across from The Senator. The new address is 5911 York Road, and the phone number is 410-727-5737. Tentative hours at the new location are Sunday through Thursday, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. and Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. The Belvedere Square location is planning a Nov. 18 grand opening featuring live music and celebrity crepe-makers. Sofi's is donating 50 percent of its profits from the opening to Our Daily Bread for Thanksgiving dinners.  Across the street from Sofi's, on the same side of the block as the Senator, Jerry's Belvedere Tavern is going to town on Girl Scout Cookies.
NEWS
July 13, 2012
Sunday, July 15 Storytelling program Ann Widdifield presents, "Uncovered Shady Side Stories — Four Nicknames, Three Brothers, and a Pair of Puppies," at 2 p.m. at the Captain Salem Avery Museum, 1418 East West Shady Side Road, as part of the museum's free Sunday Family Programs. Information: 410-867-4486 or captainaverymuseum.org . Tuesday, July 17 Documentary The Severn River Association presents a screening of "Shellshocked: Saving Oysters to Save Ourselves" at 7 p.m. at the Annapolis Maritime Museum, 723 Second St. Chris Judy, manager of the Department of Natural Resources' Marylanders Grow Oysters Program, will hold a post-screening Q&A session and provide an update of the oyster growing program.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | September 22, 2002
Fall is one of my favorite times of the year to cook outdoors and entertain. With the air crisp and clear and the temperatures cooler, sometimes even chilly, I find robust foods cooked over an open fire irresistible. This year, I've added a new recipe to my repertoire. A good friend and talented cook from Columbus, Ohio, mentioned that she loved to cook boneless pork loins wrapped in fresh herbs on the grill. The roasts, she explained, were best when marinated for several hours, then cooked slowly on a grill with a lid. Using these directions, I experimented with quite a few roasts and decided that the best was one in which a pork loin was cut open and filled with a mixture of chopped rosemary and thyme, orange peel and garlic.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | August 3, 1997
When Joel Shalowitz and Jerry Pellegrino bought Daniel's (formerly Tabrizi's) this spring and changed its name to Corks, you knew wine was going to be important. You just didn't know how important.Corks' wine list isn't a wine list. It's a major literary work. It has a table of contents. An introduction. Maps. A glossary. The only problem is that by the time you actually read it all, dinner is over.But if the list's sheer size doesn't put you in a panic, you'll find it's actually quite user-friendly, with a breezy and non-jargony text.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | March 30, 2005
OF ALL THE PIG parts that are cookable, the loin gives me the most trouble. It is too skinny. I like my pig big, flavorful and fatty. Gimme a pork shoulder or a rack of real spareribs. You rub some spices on these marbled hunks, you sweat 'em over a low fire and the results are worth waiting for. Yet modern pigs and their loins, cuts that come from the upper middle sections of their bodies, are exceptionally lean. As with so many skinny creatures, once you get beyond their svelteness, there is not much excitement.
NEWS
December 28, 2005
Kitchen tip Vary the platters on a buffet table by height, shape and texture. Use white or solid-color platters to make the food, not the plates, the star. Associated Press Know a helpful shortcut in the kitchen? Send it to Liz Atwood, Food Editor, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 21278 or e-mail it to food@baltsun.com. Site du jour whatscookingamerica.net Culinary historian Linda Stradley of Newberg, Ore., created this site in 1997, an extension of her first cookbook by the same name.
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,SUN REPORTER | June 7, 2006
Williams-Sonoma Bride & Groom Cookbook By Gayle Pirie and John Clark Betty Crocker Cookbook, Bridal Edition By Betty Crocker Editors Wiley / 2006 / $29.95 If the newlyweds you know are more the practical type, or they simply are new to the kitchen, this is a fail-safe, if not-too-exciting, cookbook for them. This book is Betty Crocker's famous "Big Red" cookbook in a pastel package. Many of the 1,000 recipes in the collection will be those the newlyweds remember their moms or grandmothers making.
FEATURES
By Jill L. Kubatko and Jill L. Kubatko,Staff Writer | May 20, 1992
The weather is warming and picnic season is fast approaching. Readers are removing cobwebs from their grills and preparing for summer-time barbecuing.David Johnson of Baltimore requested a good recipe for grilled tenderloin with a soy or teriyaki sauce that would feed a crowd -- and a visitor to Baltimore came to the rescue.Joyce Schomer of Palacios, Texas, read the request in the newspaper when traveling through town recently and sent in her recipe for a pork marinade with an oriental flavor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2011
Movies and crepes go together. The original Sofi's Crepes is still running next to The Charles, now a new Sofi's has opened directly across from The Senator. The new address is 5911 York Road, and the phone number is 410-727-5737. Tentative hours at the new location are Sunday through Thursday, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. and Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. The Belvedere Square location is planning a Nov. 18 grand opening featuring live music and celebrity crepe-makers. Sofi's is donating 50 percent of its profits from the opening to Our Daily Bread for Thanksgiving dinners.  Across the street from Sofi's, on the same side of the block as the Senator, Jerry's Belvedere Tavern is going to town on Girl Scout Cookies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2010
Cheryl Woodward from Baltimore was searching for a recipe she had misplaced for making stuffed pork loin. She does not remember the exact ingredients but she does recall that it had Swiss cheese and rosemary in the stuffing. Josie Englund from Wilmington, DE, sent in a recipe she thinks might be close to Woodward's original. She says that this stuffed pork tenderloin is one of those dishes that is relatively easy to prepare, tastes delicious and looks impressive. She says she makes it frequently for company.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | September 3, 2008
This easy dish is a great way to take advantage of "club pack" or "family pack" specials you'll often see on larger packages of pork chops and other meat. This recipe doubles easily, so you may be able to prepare a whole, large package of chops at once. Just cook the chops in batches, then make the sauce. Reserve leftover chops and sauce to serve the same way the next night. Cube them and toss into a main-dish salad, or slice thinly and use in quesadillas. You can use a value wine for the sauce, but make it something you would drink - avoid using anything labeled "cooking wine."
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,SUN REPORTER | June 7, 2006
Williams-Sonoma Bride & Groom Cookbook By Gayle Pirie and John Clark Betty Crocker Cookbook, Bridal Edition By Betty Crocker Editors Wiley / 2006 / $29.95 If the newlyweds you know are more the practical type, or they simply are new to the kitchen, this is a fail-safe, if not-too-exciting, cookbook for them. This book is Betty Crocker's famous "Big Red" cookbook in a pastel package. Many of the 1,000 recipes in the collection will be those the newlyweds remember their moms or grandmothers making.
NEWS
December 28, 2005
Kitchen tip Vary the platters on a buffet table by height, shape and texture. Use white or solid-color platters to make the food, not the plates, the star. Associated Press Know a helpful shortcut in the kitchen? Send it to Liz Atwood, Food Editor, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 21278 or e-mail it to food@baltsun.com. Site du jour whatscookingamerica.net Culinary historian Linda Stradley of Newberg, Ore., created this site in 1997, an extension of her first cookbook by the same name.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | March 30, 2005
OF ALL THE PIG parts that are cookable, the loin gives me the most trouble. It is too skinny. I like my pig big, flavorful and fatty. Gimme a pork shoulder or a rack of real spareribs. You rub some spices on these marbled hunks, you sweat 'em over a low fire and the results are worth waiting for. Yet modern pigs and their loins, cuts that come from the upper middle sections of their bodies, are exceptionally lean. As with so many skinny creatures, once you get beyond their svelteness, there is not much excitement.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | September 3, 2008
This easy dish is a great way to take advantage of "club pack" or "family pack" specials you'll often see on larger packages of pork chops and other meat. This recipe doubles easily, so you may be able to prepare a whole, large package of chops at once. Just cook the chops in batches, then make the sauce. Reserve leftover chops and sauce to serve the same way the next night. Cube them and toss into a main-dish salad, or slice thinly and use in quesadillas. You can use a value wine for the sauce, but make it something you would drink - avoid using anything labeled "cooking wine."
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | August 22, 2004
Nothing pleases me more than discovering that a young person is interested in cooking. My grown son, whose only passion while growing up seemed to be sports, now calls me regularly for culinary advice when giving a party, and several of my husbandM-Fs college students have become assistants at our house when we entertain. They come to help me in the kitchen but then confess they love getting free cooking lessons while earning extra spending money. At a small dinner we held for the 30-something daughter of good friends, I was surprised when the guest of honor told us she was taking cooking classes.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | September 22, 2002
Fall is one of my favorite times of the year to cook outdoors and entertain. With the air crisp and clear and the temperatures cooler, sometimes even chilly, I find robust foods cooked over an open fire irresistible. This year, I've added a new recipe to my repertoire. A good friend and talented cook from Columbus, Ohio, mentioned that she loved to cook boneless pork loins wrapped in fresh herbs on the grill. The roasts, she explained, were best when marinated for several hours, then cooked slowly on a grill with a lid. Using these directions, I experimented with quite a few roasts and decided that the best was one in which a pork loin was cut open and filled with a mixture of chopped rosemary and thyme, orange peel and garlic.
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