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NEWS
September 5, 2005
On Friday, September 2, 2005, HARRIET PORCELAIN (nee Baum); devoted wife of Cecil (CY) Porcelain; beloved mother of Rabbi Glenn (Barbie) Porcelain of Baltimore, MD and Tina (James) Greene of Great Neck, NY and Lois (Dan Reed) Porcelain of WI; loving sister of Lawrence (Harriet) Baum of NJ, Reuben (Sandy) Baum of NJ, Monroe Baum of NY and Ronald (Rita) Baum of NY; caring grandmother of Tani (Yoel) Gordon of Toronto, CA, Michael A. Porcelain, Alex M. Porcelain, David A. Greene, Jonathan E. Greene, Andrea Porcelain and Rachel Reed.
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NEWS
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home+Living | February 4, 2011
When it comes to doors, knobs, floors, molding and such for the home, discussions typically focus on the history of styles. But when it comes to tile, the conversation is about what's happening now. Aided by new technology, tile today is more eco-friendly and more widely available in a vast range of finishes and textures. As a hard, watertight surface applied to floors and walls, ceramic, stone and porcelain have been commonly used for thousands of years. In some ways, not much has changed.
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FEATURES
By Lita and Sally Solis-CohenLita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita and Sally Solis-CohenLita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers Solis-Cohen Enterprises Peter R. Solis-Cohen contributed to this story | December 19, 1993
Politics, power, prestige and porcelain, inexorably linked for centuries, are put on pedestals in a new museum exhibit made possible in part by Germany's reunification and political upheaval in Eastern Europe. The interplay between dishes, design, dynasties and diplomacy is examined in "Along the Royal Road: Berlin and Potsdam in KPM Porcelain and Painting 1815-1848," the inaugural exhibition at the Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts in New York. Although the exhibit can be enjoyed simply as a display of beautiful and rare objects, it has layers of meaning as colorful and complex as painted KPM porcelains themselves.
NEWS
January 29, 2008
VIKTOR SCHRECKENGOST, 101 Artist, industrial designer Viktor Schreckengost, an artist and prolific industrial designer whose ubiquitous works included familiar toys, White House porcelain, innovative trucks and lawn mowers, died Saturday while visiting family in Tallahassee, Fla. Mr. Schreckengost, a 2006 winner of the National Medal of Arts, was best-known for his 1930s Jazz Bowl series, commissioned by Eleanor Roosevelt for the White House. The electric blue and black porcelain bowls, inspired by the sights and sounds of New York City, became icons of the art deco era. Mr. Schreckengost incorporated fine design into mass-produced goods in an effort to make aesthetically pleasing, functional items available to everyone.
FEATURES
By Anne McCollam and Anne McCollam,Copley News Service | April 17, 1994
Q: I am anxiously looking forward to any information you can give me on a porcelain I own.On the bottom it is marked "R St K -- Turn-Teplitz -- Bohemia -- Austria."A: Your porcelain bust was made by the Amphora Porzellan Fabrik that was founded in 1892 by Riessner & Kessel in Turn-Teplitz, Bohemia.Many of their vases, figurines and busts were produced for export. Your porcelain bust was made around 1900. Busts similar to this are seen in antiques shops in excess of $1,000.Q: I recently inherited a set of burgundy and ivory dishes.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1995
Nancy Turnbull Coates Smith, a much-respected figure in the Harford County arts community who was known for her work in several media, died of cancer Tuesday at her Fallston residence. She was 45.Mrs. Smith was a porcelain production worker in the Havre de Grace studio of Blythe & Snodgrass, creators of porcelain dolls, until last spring, when she left because of ill health."Her own work, which consisted of porcelain boxes, honey pots and mobiles, was very fanciful with rather unique design qualities.
FEATURES
By Theo Lippman Jr. and Theo Lippman Jr.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 26, 2001
OCEAN VIEW, Del. - Amid handwritten cards advertising yard sales, lawn services, baby sitters, church suppers and so forth on the community bulletin board in the local grocery the other day, I saw a "for sale" ad for a black porcelain enamel Delaware license plate with the number 981. Three-digit plates are fairly rare on the market. When I got home, I told my wife, "I might buy it." "How much?" she asked. "Sixteen thousand five hundred dollars." Her jaw dropped. "But don't worry," I said.
NEWS
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home+Living | February 4, 2011
When it comes to doors, knobs, floors, molding and such for the home, discussions typically focus on the history of styles. But when it comes to tile, the conversation is about what's happening now. Aided by new technology, tile today is more eco-friendly and more widely available in a vast range of finishes and textures. As a hard, watertight surface applied to floors and walls, ceramic, stone and porcelain have been commonly used for thousands of years. In some ways, not much has changed.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2000
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia - The Lomonosov Porcelain Factory is as familiar and revered in Russia as a cup of hot, ever-so-sweet tea. The czars built it for themselves 256 years ago, eager for a supply of porcelain befitting European royalty. Many generations later, the fire of Revolution turned the artists into ardent communists who produced the best of Soviet realism with plates and figurines. The 1970s era of stagnation made the Lomonosov a plebian teapot factory. Perhaps nothing in its fabled history, however, could have prepared the factory for the latest, astonishing, turn of fate.
FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,COWLES SYNDICATE | April 28, 1996
My friend gave me her mother's hand-painted cocoa set. Some of the pieces are marked with a shield with the word "Thomas" in the center and "Bavaria" below. Some are marked with "B & Co. France."Why would there be two different names?The first mark was used around 1908 by the porcelain factory of F. Thomas. It was in Marktredwitz, Bavaria, Germany.The company was sold and is now a subsidiary of Rosenthal Glass & Porcelain.The other mark was used after 1925 by L. Bernardaud & Co. in Limoges and Paris, France.
FEATURES
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,Sun reporter | November 19, 2007
When Steven Soifer was 11 years old, bullies tried to break into the bathroom stall he was using. The University of Maryland associate professor has been avidly interested in public facilities ever since: their construction, privacy and accessiblity - in short, their role in civilized life. Soifer, who teaches community organizing at the School of Social Work downtown, is a co-founder of the Baltimore-based American Restroom Association, an advocacy group that demands more and better communal bathrooms.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to the Sun | March 2, 2007
Sonya Taylor lives in what her brother calls a beautiful jewel box. In a space of only 530 square feet, she is blanketed in international furnishings, paintings and decorative art. The quiet of her tiny domain is periodically punctuated by the coo-coo of a clock in her tiny kitchen. "I had to get used to city noise," said this 71-year-old retired government worker and volunteer political activist. "Now, I hardly notice it." Taylor purchased her efficiency condominium 23 years ago, having left a large home in Monkton after a divorce.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | November 19, 2006
Susan Sullivan picked up a doll head from a desk in the basement of her Carroll County home and sanded an area on the face that she had filled with Apoxie Sculpt, a self-hardening repair compound. "This doll had a crack above the eye," Sullivan said, dusting some of the debris from the sanding pad. "Once I've finished sanding it, I'll paint it with an airbrush." The doll is one of many that Sullivan, a certified doll doctor since 2004, repairs in her home-based "doll hospital." Her desire to repair dolls resulted from her fascination with dolls that were not in perfect condition, she said.
NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS and ERICA MARCUS,NEWSDAY | March 15, 2006
What is stoneware and why is it so popular? Is it a better conductor than metal or ceramic bakeware? Pottery, that is vessels that are made of fired clay, can roughly be divided into three categories: stoneware, porcelain and earthenware. Stoneware is fired at a high temperature (about 2,185 degrees) which makes it very hard, durable and impervious to water. It is vitreous or semivitreous, though still opaque. Porcelain can be classified as a type of vitreous stoneware, one in which very fine clay becomes translucent when fired.
NEWS
March 12, 2006
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY HERB WORKSHOPS Learn to create a container herb garden with naturalist Glenda Weber, sample foods made with fresh herbs and share recipes at a workshop at 10:30 a.m. Friday or Saturday at Cylburn Greenhouse, 4915 Greenspring Ave. There will also be a workshop on using herbs in cooking, for soothing or for scent, 1 p.m. Saturday. Each workshop costs $20 per person. Reservations recommended. 410-367-2217 or cylburnassociation.org. SATURDAY AND MARCH 19 ORCHID FESTIVAL There will be a show and sale of exotic orchids, information on growing them and help in repotting them, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. March 19 at Brookside Gardens Visitors Center, 1800 Glenallan Ave., Wheaton.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | February 16, 2006
Porcelain exhibit Starting Saturday, Baltimore Clayworks Gallery displays pottery by Tom and Elaine Coleman and Frank Boydem. The exhibit, Porcelain -- Three Ways, includes about 60 pieces from the internationally known artists. "We felt that [Tom's] work had a lot to offer, and Elaine and Frank are just the icing on the cake as far as I'm concerned," said exhibitions director Leigh Taylor Mickelson. Porcelain -- Three Ways opens Saturday and runs through March 26. There will be a reception 6 p.m.-8 p.m. Saturday.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | December 19, 2001
The Italian explorer Marco Polo is said to have named a new type of ceramic he found during his famous travels through China between 1271 and 1295. It reminded him of the smooth whiteness of the cowry shell, which the Italians called porcellana. The history of porcelain -- and Marco Polo's role in discovering it - is charmingly related in Marilyn Stokstad's authoritative book, Art History. Porcelain is made from kaolin, a white clay, and petuntse, a variety of feldspar. When fired at high temperature, the two materials fuse into the glasslike, translucent ceramic we call china.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | February 16, 2006
Porcelain exhibit Starting Saturday, Baltimore Clayworks Gallery displays pottery by Tom and Elaine Coleman and Frank Boydem. The exhibit, Porcelain -- Three Ways, includes about 60 pieces from the internationally known artists. "We felt that [Tom's] work had a lot to offer, and Elaine and Frank are just the icing on the cake as far as I'm concerned," said exhibitions director Leigh Taylor Mickelson. Porcelain -- Three Ways opens Saturday and runs through March 26. There will be a reception 6 p.m.-8 p.m. Saturday.
NEWS
September 5, 2005
On Friday, September 2, 2005, HARRIET PORCELAIN (nee Baum); devoted wife of Cecil (CY) Porcelain; beloved mother of Rabbi Glenn (Barbie) Porcelain of Baltimore, MD and Tina (James) Greene of Great Neck, NY and Lois (Dan Reed) Porcelain of WI; loving sister of Lawrence (Harriet) Baum of NJ, Reuben (Sandy) Baum of NJ, Monroe Baum of NY and Ronald (Rita) Baum of NY; caring grandmother of Tani (Yoel) Gordon of Toronto, CA, Michael A. Porcelain, Alex M. Porcelain, David A. Greene, Jonathan E. Greene, Andrea Porcelain and Rachel Reed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | May 8, 2003
Clay Orbit show See an exhibit of functional porcelain works by Carol Brody and watercolor paintings by Rebecca Pearl at the aptly titled show Porcelain and Paint at Clay Orbit. The show runs through June 1. Brody's wheel-thrown and slab-built vessels will be on display, along with her series of miniature teapots. She is showing her porcelain works at five other galleries on the East Coast, including Baltimore Clayworks. Rebecca Pearl, a longtime member of the Baltimore Watercolor Society, will show 17 original watercolor paintings.
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