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By Peter Duvall | April 25, 2013
With the city putting together a plan for adding 10,000 families to Baltimore, this is a good time for interested Baltimoreans to weigh in. I'm told that the plan will be driven by the best possible data - a great place to start. But the plan needs to address a critical question: Who is going to want to live here during the next decade? Some of the trends that are driving Baltimore's nascent revival will prove almost impossible to determine based on the opinions of the city's current population, many of whom live here because of ties to family and friends or because housing is relatively affordable, not because they particularly want to live in a city.
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NEWS
September 18, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's report on strategies to attract immigrants to Baltimore offers dozens of recommendations, but for those who are not immigrants or connected to the immigrant community, it may raise two big questions. First, at a time when the national debate about immigration policy focuses on what to do about those who entered the country illegally, the report makes no distinction whatsoever between immigrants who are citizens, those who are legal aliens or those who have no documentation at all. Is that in our best interests?
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NEWS
June 24, 2012
While I agree that chemicals and manure are major problems contributing to Chesapeake Bay pollution, there are two additional concerns that should be addressed. One is the pollution associated with power mowers, leaf blowers and edgers. Most or these gasoline engines have little or no pollution controls. The second is the increasing population in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. During my lifetime, the population in Maryland has more than tripled, and homes and highways continue to reduce the efficiency of trees in cleansing the environment.
NEWS
July 28, 2014
Commentator Jonathan David Farley feels as sanguine about detaining immigrant children in prisons before sending them back to the squalor from which they came as he does informing us of his academic credentials, proving once again that a career in academia may confer knowledge without wisdom ( "#Sendthemback," July 23). He sees the trees but not the forest. The trees are the individual kids who promise to cost us all a lot of tax dollars before they can begin to repay their debt to society.
NEWS
July 16, 2012
Regarding a recent Sun op-ed page, it's rare to see two commentaries side by side that perfectly cancel each other out. In one, John Seager notes that the Earth's population is growing at a rate of 80 million people a year ("An Unhappy World Population Day," July 11). In the other, Thomas F. Schaller exhorts us to welcome immigrants even when their "economic pressure forces those of us already here to work harder" ("Hostility toward recent immigrants a long U.S. tradition," July 11). It might occur to Mr. Schaller that today jobs are a precious commodity, and it's only natural to want them protected.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2013
Not too long ago, Carroll County faced a problem: Rapid growth had brought crowded classrooms to the northeastern part of the county, and planners expected many more homes to be built in the area. "At one point, they were 400 kids over capacity at North Carroll High," said Bill Caine, facilities planner for the school system. It seemed inevitable that a new high school would be filled within a few years, so the county decided to build Manchester Valley High, which could accommodate 1,300 students -- at a cost of $80 million.
NEWS
By TOM HORTON | May 14, 1994
The pollsters for the Bay Attitudes Survey, released last week by the Environmental Protection Agency, somehow missed me in randomly interviewing 2,004 of the 14 million people in the six-state Chesapeake watershed.I'd have given quite a different ranking of the bay's most serious pollutants than the one shown by the poll.Here's how the respondents rated nine pollution threats:Industry (74 percent ranked it among the most serious); Commercial shipping spills (70 percent); Recreational Boating (67)
NEWS
By Mike Burns | April 5, 1998
WHETHER IT'S smart growth or not, Carroll County is among the hottest growth spots in the state.Westminster ranks at the top of Maryland cities in population growth from 1990 to 1996. The county seat increased by 15.4 percent in that period.Rankings obviously change over time. Much of Westminster is built-out, so some other town will probably be atop the growth chart next time.No one is saying that Westminster attracted the largest number of new residents. That double-edged honor goes to nearby Frederick, which surpassed Rockville, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.
NEWS
By Mike Burns | March 21, 1999
A REPORT out of the U.S. Census Bureau last week stated that the number of residents in suburban Baltimore, including Carroll County, continued to grow during the past year. Not as rapidly as in previous years, but still increasing. Baltimore City, no surprise, again lost population.Carroll and Howard counties were percentage-gain leaders in population growth in the metro area last year, as they have been since the 1990 Census. During the decade, Carroll's population has risen by 21 percent, Howard's by 26 percent.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | November 1, 2005
Dr. Young J. Kim, a Johns Hopkins research scientist who studied the dynamics of world population growth, was killed Thursday in an automobile accident at Dulaney Valley and Timonium roads. The Towson resident was 71. Born Young Ja Kang in Tokyo, the daughter of a Korean physician, she initially studied physics and earned a bachelor of science degree at Seoul National University. After moving to the United States in the 1960s, she received a master's degree from Indiana University. She and her husband, Chung W. Kim, moved to Baltimore in 1966 as he joined the Johns Hopkins University faculty and she earned a doctorate in biostatistics there.
NEWS
By Andrew Wainer | December 26, 2013
In the midst of the debate over the largest potential immigration reform legislation in 50 years, American communities struggling with decades of population loss and economic decline are being revitalized by newcomers. The economic contribution of immigrants in high-skilled fields is relatively well-known, but less acknowledged are the contributions that "blue collar" immigrants make in revitalizing depressed communities and economies, both as manual laborers and small business entrepreneurs.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2013
With the 10th year of the modern Maryland bear hunt approaching, state bear biologist Harry Spiker, who has managed the hunt since its return after a 51-year absence, reflected in an interview with The Baltimore Sun on what happened when the hunt returned, whether he feels it has accomplisted its goals, and where the hunt - and the bears - will be going in the future. BS: With the 10th year of the bear hunt coming up this week (Oct. 21-26), what do you remember of the hunt back in 2004?
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2013
Maryland's job base is finally back to the size it was half a decade ago — before the deep recession gouged a big chunk out of it. It's a psychologically important milepost in the long slog toward recovery, one reached as the nation is still climbing out of the hole. But numbers released Friday by the U.S. Department of Labor show the state's job market remains far from normal. About 219,000 Marylanders were out of work and looking for a job in August, 120,000 more than in February 2008, just before the effects of the Great Recession caught up with the state.
NEWS
September 6, 2013
The main point to be drawn from Tom Horton's article about immigration's impact on the Chesapeake Bay region is that there's no way to separate population problems from environmental problems, and vice versa ("Immigration's impact," Sept. 3). Advocates for both issues have failed to acknowledge this fact for far too long, but the hot-button issue of immigration makes it impossible for them to continue to maintain their distance. As Mr. Horton noted, whatever the merits of immigration reform, immigration will remain the primary factor in U.S. population growth, which, if present rates continue, will swell from our present 315 million to some 445 million by mid-century.
NEWS
By Dan Ellis | August 26, 2013
Earlier this year, Baltimore's challenge to the 2010 Census established that the city had 621,074 residents on April 1, 2010. This revised number will now be used by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake as the baseline for counting toward her goal of growing the city's population by 10,000 families (22,000 people) in a decade. We're already on the way with 621,342 people as of March, and Neighborhood Housing Services of Baltimore, the nonprofit organization that I lead, has more good news on that front.
NEWS
By Joel Dunn | July 16, 2013
A little osprey chick has been the center of attention for a growing crowd of admirers this summer. It's the third chick to hatch to a pair of osprey, Tom and Audrey, who make their home on a nesting platform at the end of a dock on Kent Island. It's an osprey home like many others, with one exception: It has a hi-def video camera attached. So Tom and Audrey's busy nest-hold is being beamed out to the world via http://www.chesapeakeconservancy.org , a real reality TV show. Thousands of folks check in daily to see whether Tom has brought home the fish, whether Audrey is tending the nest, and - maybe most of all - whether that little chick will survive to fly away.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 17, 1996
UNITED NATIONS -- A new survey by the United Nations has found that the world's population is growing almost everywhere more slowly than expected even a few years ago. The study also found that the number of people being added to the world each year has begun to fall sooner than anticipated."
NEWS
May 22, 2013
Just when Washington looked like it was completely preoccupied with the scandals, real and imaginary, swirling around the White House, a group of Democrats and Republicans in the Senate managed the unexpected (and, these days, extraordinary): They agreed on something. The vote Tuesday night in the Senate Judiciary Committee to forward to the floor a massive overhaul of the nation's immigration system was, to be sure, a small step and doesn't guarantee success in the full Senate, much less the House of Representatives.
NEWS
By Peter Duvall | April 25, 2013
With the city putting together a plan for adding 10,000 families to Baltimore, this is a good time for interested Baltimoreans to weigh in. I'm told that the plan will be driven by the best possible data - a great place to start. But the plan needs to address a critical question: Who is going to want to live here during the next decade? Some of the trends that are driving Baltimore's nascent revival will prove almost impossible to determine based on the opinions of the city's current population, many of whom live here because of ties to family and friends or because housing is relatively affordable, not because they particularly want to live in a city.
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