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NEWS
January 26, 2012
Diana Schaub's recent commentary missed the facts ("Abortion and population," Jan. 23). To blame Baltimore's population decline on abortion is misleading at best. It is a broad statement that fails to deeply consider the varied reasons women choose to terminate a pregnancy. Ms. Schaub writes that "In 1970, Baltimore City abortion rates for single white and black women stood at 7.43 and 10, respectively. " Yet, the Supreme Court decision did not occur until 1973. Ms. Schaub continues by citing an increase in the abortion rate in Baltimore that grew to 86.2 by 2005.
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NEWS
Stephanie Rawlings-Blake | August 28, 2014
Baltimore City elicits genuine pride from its residents. Every neighborhood is unique, and generations of families have stayed here because they were not willing to give up on this great city. After decades of population decline, Baltimore is finally growing again. We did not get here by accident, nor did we get here by thinking small. I am determined to grow Baltimore by continuing to build projects that will sustain Baltimore well into the future. Thousands of local jobs are being created through projects like the recently opened Horseshoe Baltimore Casino.
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NEWS
January 25, 2012
Your Sunday article about the doubling in the number of homeless students mentioned that Baltimore City had the largest number of homeless students in the state ("Homeless student numbers growing," Jan. 22). The next day, Diana Schaub's commentary decried the effect of abortions on Baltimore City's population ("Abortion and population," Jan. 23). I found it quite telling that Ms. Schaub chose to quote the 1959 play "A Raisin in the Sun. " She obviously still believes we live in the same world as 1959.
NEWS
May 29, 2013
Regarding Timothy B. Wheeler's recent article on declining amphibian populations, the mysterious disappearance of many frogs may be due to an invasive plant species known as buckthorn ("Alarming U.S. decline seen in environment's sentinels," May 23). Buckthorn was imported from Europe in the 19th century and was initially employed for garden hedges. But since then it has spread throughout the woodlands of America. Buckthorn is notorious for shading other native plants, inhibiting their growth and allowing increased visibility for amphibian predators.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2012
Few people, from politicians to commenters on Facebook, expressed surprise when The Baltimore Sun reported Thursday that the city's population has continued on a downward trajectory. Some did wonder, though, whether the minuscule number of people lost was worth reporting and how the U.S. Census Bureau arrived at its estimates. Baltimore's loss was teensy. Only 0.2 percent of Charm City's population - 1,500 people - departed in the 15-month period following the April 2010 Census, according to the Census Bureau's first city population estimates of the decade.
NEWS
January 25, 2012
At a time when birth control is cheap and readily available, it's deplorable Baltimore City has such high rates of abortion. But unlike your columnist, I don't think this has anything to do with the shrinking population of the city ("Abortion and population," Jan. 23). Whatever the 18 t h -century French philosopher Montesquieu said about the great cities of the past, it has no bearing on Baltimore in 2012. The reason people flee Baltimore is twofold: Exorbitant property taxes and a rotten school system.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2011
Arriving in Baltimore for college in 2004 from her native New York City, Vienna DeGiacomo assumed she would quickly head back north after graduating from Goucher College. But nearly three years after receiving her English degree, DeGiacomo, 24, is still here, in part waiting for her husband to finish law school but also, she said, enjoying the city's job opportunities and relatively low living costs. After graduating, she received "a great job offer" from the investment firm T. Rowe Price.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2002
Halting the "outward migration" from Baltimore to the suburbs, clearing some of the 14,000 abandoned dwellings that dot inner-city streets and providing "treatment on demand" for thousands of drug addicts emerged last night as priorities for the city at a Citizens Planning and Housing Association rally. About 1,000 city and regional activists attended the two-hour event at the Baltimore Convention Center to hear officials talk about issues from transportation to controlling sprawl. Mayor Martin O'Malley was scheduled to speak but did not attend, a day after saying he would not run for governor.
NEWS
March 17, 2013
The Census report this week showing that Baltimore's population grew last year for the first time in decades is an encouraging sign that the long-term hemorrhaging of city residents to the suburbs may finally be turning around. Though the absolute numbers estimated in the survey were small - the bureau found a net increase of just 1,100 residents during the 12 months that ended July 1, bringing the total to 621,342 - even that modest rise after 60 years of continuous losses offers hope that the city need not resign itself to a future of perpetual decline.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2002
Baltimore leaders need to encourage at least three times as many foreign-born people to move here if they hope to reverse the city's population decline, according to a new report that calls for improved job and housing opportunities for immigrants. The report, by the Bethesda-based Morrison Public Affairs Group, advises that Baltimore must increase the net number of foreign-born residents it attracts by "three- to four-fold" from the average of 2,000 a year it drew during the 1990s, when the city lost nearly 85,000 people.
NEWS
March 17, 2013
The Census report this week showing that Baltimore's population grew last year for the first time in decades is an encouraging sign that the long-term hemorrhaging of city residents to the suburbs may finally be turning around. Though the absolute numbers estimated in the survey were small - the bureau found a net increase of just 1,100 residents during the 12 months that ended July 1, bringing the total to 621,342 - even that modest rise after 60 years of continuous losses offers hope that the city need not resign itself to a future of perpetual decline.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
Baltimore, coming off six decades of population decline, grew by 1,100 residents in 12 months, according to government estimates released Thursday. "It's such amazing news. … It's huge psychologically," said Seema D. Iyer, a former research chief for the city's planning department now with the University of Baltimore's Jacob France Institute. For years, the U.S. Census Bureau's annual calculation delivered to the city disappointing news of a falling population, but now it seems to be turning around.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2012
Few people, from politicians to commenters on Facebook, expressed surprise when The Baltimore Sun reported Thursday that the city's population has continued on a downward trajectory. Some did wonder, though, whether the minuscule number of people lost was worth reporting and how the U.S. Census Bureau arrived at its estimates. Baltimore's loss was teensy. Only 0.2 percent of Charm City's population - 1,500 people - departed in the 15-month period following the April 2010 Census, according to the Census Bureau's first city population estimates of the decade.
NEWS
January 26, 2012
Diana Schaub's recent commentary missed the facts ("Abortion and population," Jan. 23). To blame Baltimore's population decline on abortion is misleading at best. It is a broad statement that fails to deeply consider the varied reasons women choose to terminate a pregnancy. Ms. Schaub writes that "In 1970, Baltimore City abortion rates for single white and black women stood at 7.43 and 10, respectively. " Yet, the Supreme Court decision did not occur until 1973. Ms. Schaub continues by citing an increase in the abortion rate in Baltimore that grew to 86.2 by 2005.
NEWS
January 25, 2012
Your Sunday article about the doubling in the number of homeless students mentioned that Baltimore City had the largest number of homeless students in the state ("Homeless student numbers growing," Jan. 22). The next day, Diana Schaub's commentary decried the effect of abortions on Baltimore City's population ("Abortion and population," Jan. 23). I found it quite telling that Ms. Schaub chose to quote the 1959 play "A Raisin in the Sun. " She obviously still believes we live in the same world as 1959.
NEWS
January 25, 2012
At a time when birth control is cheap and readily available, it's deplorable Baltimore City has such high rates of abortion. But unlike your columnist, I don't think this has anything to do with the shrinking population of the city ("Abortion and population," Jan. 23). Whatever the 18 t h -century French philosopher Montesquieu said about the great cities of the past, it has no bearing on Baltimore in 2012. The reason people flee Baltimore is twofold: Exorbitant property taxes and a rotten school system.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
Baltimore, coming off six decades of population decline, grew by 1,100 residents in 12 months, according to government estimates released Thursday. "It's such amazing news. … It's huge psychologically," said Seema D. Iyer, a former research chief for the city's planning department now with the University of Baltimore's Jacob France Institute. For years, the U.S. Census Bureau's annual calculation delivered to the city disappointing news of a falling population, but now it seems to be turning around.
NEWS
December 30, 2011
The city is misguided if it believes that demolishing vacant homes is the solution to providing affordable housing in Baltimore ("City 'affordable housing' fund destroys more houses than it builds," Dec. 21). Demolishing vacant homes is myopic, since the number of vacant homes will increase as long as the city's population continues to decline. That alone will undermine any alleged improvements to public safety. A 1996 demolition project targeting vacant housing stock in Camden, N.J., initially decreased the vacant housing stock of the city.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2012
What comes to mind when Mexican immigrant Elsa Garcia thinks of Baltimore's drawbacks? "Basura. O las drogas," said the East Baltimore resident. "Trash. Or drugs. " Then, quickly, comes her list of Baltimore's pluses: Her husband has been able to find construction work. They have affordable housing. Police are not automatically suspicious of immigrants. By and large, Garcia's perception of Baltimore is positive. It's the kind of opinion Baltimore must foster among immigrants, experts say, if the city is to turn around six decades of population decline.
NEWS
December 30, 2011
The city is misguided if it believes that demolishing vacant homes is the solution to providing affordable housing in Baltimore ("City 'affordable housing' fund destroys more houses than it builds," Dec. 21). Demolishing vacant homes is myopic, since the number of vacant homes will increase as long as the city's population continues to decline. That alone will undermine any alleged improvements to public safety. A 1996 demolition project targeting vacant housing stock in Camden, N.J., initially decreased the vacant housing stock of the city.
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