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By New York Times News Service | April 21, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The French company that makes the abortion pill RU-486 has agreed to license the drug to a U.S. contraceptive research group so it can find a manufacturer in the United States, the commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration said yesterday.The commissioner, Dr. David Kessler, said that after a meeting yesterday in Rockville, Md., Edouard Sakiz, president of the French company, Roussel-Uclaf, agreed to license the drug and the technology to make it to the Population Council, a not-for-profit research organization based in New York City.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 1996
A dispute between the groups working to bring the French abortion pill to American women is threatening to create further delays in making the drug, mifepristone, available.On Monday, the Population Council, the nonprofit family planning group that holds the U.S. rights to mifepristone, and Advances in Health Technology, another nonprofit group set up to educate doctors about the drug, filed suit against Joseph D. Pike, who was chosen by the council to raise money to manufacture and distribute mifepristone.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 14, 1996
NEW YORK - A New York organization said yesterday that it has made its own copy of the French abortion pill, RU-486, and would begin testing to help speed the drug to market in the United States.But another group, which holds the American patent on RU-486, said the tests were unnecessary.The group announcing the new tests, Abortion Rights Mobilization, said it had manufactured some of the pills and hoped to begin testing soon on 2,000 to 3,000 women around the country.The Population Council, a nonprofit research group in New York that obtained the U.S. patent rights to RU-486 two years ago, said, however, that it had just completed clinical trials in which 2,100 women were given the drug to terminate their pregnancies.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 19, 1996
WASHINGTON -- After a quarter-century of research and a decade of controversy, the French abortion pill gained yesterday the federal government's conditional approval for ending pregnancies privately and without surgery.Potentially moving most abortions out of clinics and away from the conflicts outside those facilities, the Food and Drug Administration said that RU-486 appears safe and effective "when used under close medical supervision" to induce abortions.RU-486, an invention of a French scientist, is formally known as mifepristone.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | May 16, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Despite the Clinton administration's solicitous attitude toward RU-486, efforts to make the so-called abortion pill widely available have been stalled for months by the manufacturer's fears of a backlash from abortion foes.One of President Clinton's first acts was to move to lift the U.S. ban on the French-invented drug, which serves as a licensed alternative to surgical abortion in Britain, France and Sweden.He ordered Secretary of Health and Human Services Donna E. Shalala to begin proceedings to get RU-486 licensed and manufactured in this country as quickly as possible.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 19, 1996
WASHINGTON -- After a quarter-century of research and a decade of controversy, the French abortion pill gained yesterday the federal government's conditional approval for ending pregnancies privately and without surgery.Potentially moving most abortions out of clinics and away from the conflicts outside those facilities, the Food and Drug Administration said that RU-486 appears safe and effective "when used under close medical supervision" to induce abortions.RU-486, an invention of a French scientist, is formally known as mifepristone.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 1996
A dispute between the groups working to bring the French abortion pill to American women is threatening to create further delays in making the drug, mifepristone, available.On Monday, the Population Council, the nonprofit family planning group that holds the U.S. rights to mifepristone, and Advances in Health Technology, another nonprofit group set up to educate doctors about the drug, filed suit against Joseph D. Pike, who was chosen by the council to raise money to manufacture and distribute mifepristone.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | October 2, 1990
A panel of experts gathered by Planned Parenthood of Maryland asserted yesterday that the United States lags many years behind Western Europe and even some Third World nations in making new forms of contraceptions available.The experts -- who included physicians, research scientists and family-planning advocates -- blamed the sluggish pace of contraceptive development on a lack of federal research grants, DTC corporate fears that birth control is unprofitable and the specter of multimillion-dollar liability suits.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 21, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Breaking a long-standing impasse over whether the controversial abortion pill RU-486 ever will be available in the United States, its French manufacturer has agreed to license the drug to a New York-based scientific research organization for eventual distribution here, the Food and Drug Administration has announced.The agreement between the pill-maker, Roussel-Uclaf, and the Population Council will enable the U.S. organization to find a manufacturer in the United States willing to conduct clinical trials of the drug that are likely to lead to FDA marketing approval for the pill.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff Writer | May 24, 1994
This fall, some American women seeking an abortion will be offered their first alternative to surgery: RU-486, the abortion drug widely used in Europe and China.The Population Council, a nonprofit contraceptive research organization in New York, holds the American patent rights to the drug. It soon will select sites for clinical trials required by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) before the drug can be made available to the public. The Population Council expects approval in two years.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 14, 1996
NEW YORK - A New York organization said yesterday that it has made its own copy of the French abortion pill, RU-486, and would begin testing to help speed the drug to market in the United States.But another group, which holds the American patent on RU-486, said the tests were unnecessary.The group announcing the new tests, Abortion Rights Mobilization, said it had manufactured some of the pills and hoped to begin testing soon on 2,000 to 3,000 women around the country.The Population Council, a nonprofit research group in New York that obtained the U.S. patent rights to RU-486 two years ago, said, however, that it had just completed clinical trials in which 2,100 women were given the drug to terminate their pregnancies.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff Writer | May 24, 1994
This fall, some American women seeking an abortion will be offered their first alternative to surgery: RU-486, the abortion drug widely used in Europe and China.The Population Council, a nonprofit contraceptive research organization in New York, holds the American patent rights to the drug. It soon will select sites for clinical trials required by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) before the drug can be made available to the public. The Population Council expects approval in two years.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | May 16, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Despite the Clinton administration's solicitous attitude toward RU-486, efforts to make the so-called abortion pill widely available have been stalled for months by the manufacturer's fears of a backlash from abortion foes.One of President Clinton's first acts was to move to lift the U.S. ban on the French-invented drug, which serves as a licensed alternative to surgical abortion in Britain, France and Sweden.He ordered Secretary of Health and Human Services Donna E. Shalala to begin proceedings to get RU-486 licensed and manufactured in this country as quickly as possible.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 21, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Breaking a long-standing impasse over whether the controversial abortion pill RU-486 ever will be available in the United States, its French manufacturer has agreed to license the drug to a New York-based scientific research organization for eventual distribution here, the Food and Drug Administration has announced.The agreement between the pill-maker, Roussel-Uclaf, and the Population Council will enable the U.S. organization to find a manufacturer in the United States willing to conduct clinical trials of the drug that are likely to lead to FDA marketing approval for the pill.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 21, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The French company that makes the abortion pill RU-486 has agreed to license the drug to a U.S. contraceptive research group so it can find a manufacturer in the United States, the commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration said yesterday.The commissioner, Dr. David Kessler, said that after a meeting yesterday in Rockville, Md., Edouard Sakiz, president of the French company, Roussel-Uclaf, agreed to license the drug and the technology to make it to the Population Council, a not-for-profit research organization based in New York City.
NEWS
May 19, 1992
THE LAVISH salary and perks given William Aramony when he was president of the United Way of America has turned the spotlight on the compensation of other chief executives of major charities. None came even close, according to a survey by Money magazine, although one reached hailing distance.And none was paid an unconscionable salary when compared with the chief executives of private businesses of similar size. On average, the charity executives earned half what their private-sector counterparts did. But should executives whose salaries derive from donations aspire to the same compensation as the heads of profit-making companies?
NEWS
May 19, 1992
THE LAVISH salary and perks given William Aramony when he was president of the United Way of America has turned the spotlight on the compensation of other chief executives of major charities. None came even close, according to a survey by Money magazine, although one reached hailing distance.And none was paid an unconscionable salary when compared with the chief executives of private businesses of similar size. On average, the charity executives earned half what their private-sector counterparts did. But should executives whose salaries derive from donations aspire to the same compensation as the heads of profit-making companies?
NEWS
By HEARST NEWSPAPERS | June 25, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The House voted yesterday to bar the Food and Drug Administration from spending federal money to test, develop or approve any drug -- including the French abortion pill RU-486 -- that would chemically induce abortion.By a vote of 223-202, lawmakers amended the fiscal 1999 agriculture spending bill to include the ban, then overwhelmingly approved the $56 billion agriculture bill. Thirty-five Democrats joined 188 Republicans in voting for the anti-abortion measure.Advocates of abortion rights swiftly attacked the move, although even the sponsor of the amendment, Rep. Tom Coburn, conceded it was unlikely to be approved by the Senate.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | October 2, 1990
A panel of experts gathered by Planned Parenthood of Maryland asserted yesterday that the United States lags many years behind Western Europe and even some Third World nations in making new forms of contraceptions available.The experts -- who included physicians, research scientists and family-planning advocates -- blamed the sluggish pace of contraceptive development on a lack of federal research grants, DTC corporate fears that birth control is unprofitable and the specter of multimillion-dollar liability suits.
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