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By WALTER TRUETT ANDERSON | September 2, 1994
The religious controversy swirling around next week's Cairo population conference has tended to overshadow its importance a landmark of our entry into a new, puzzling era of global information politics. In this new information era, nongovernmental organizations are more visible than statesmen, the media is as much a participant as an observer, and influencing public opinion is at least as important as shaping public policy.To get an idea of how this new world order (or disorder) differs from the past, compare the Cairo conference to the 1945 Yalta conference that did so much to create the post-war world.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2013
Werner H. Fornos, who fled post-World War II Germany as a teen and became an advocate for global population control after serving in the Maryland House of Delegates, died of diabetic complications Jan. 16 at his home in Basye, Va. The former Davidsonville resident was 79. Born Werner Horst Farenhold in Leipzig, Germany, he was separated from his family during the World War II during Allied bombing when the apartment building where the family lived...
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NEWS
By Jane Fonda | September 6, 1994
FOR DECADES, the controversy around contraception and abortion has made it politically easier to speak and organize around air pollution, deforestation, toxic waste and biodiversity than around the issue of population.As Dennis Meadows writes in "Limits To Growth," "You can always blame any particular problem on something that is not over-population. Nobody ever dies from over-population. They die of famine, disease, war."Scientists agree that the precise relationship between population and environmental destruction is not fully understood.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2012
Dr. Frances H. Trimble, a gynecologist who had been medical director of Planned Parenthood of Maryland for nearly three decades, died Friday of pneumonia at Roland Park Place. She was 94. "She took Planned Parenthood from a highly criticized small organization at the time and made it into a force," said Dr. J. Courtland Robinson, who succeeded Dr. Trimble as medical director. "It was about women's rights and contraception, and she gave it the medical leadership to make it go. And it grew into a large, large organization.
NEWS
November 24, 1996
WHEN THE Department of Natural Resources is involved, very often its solution is to kill the animals. The Sun's Nov. 16 editorial has now taken a typical DNR approach, advocating ill-conceived and cruel managed deer hunts.DNR's deer-killing philosophy is both ineffective and inhumane. It fails to recognize that deer exercise a population control of their own. If the deer population increases in a given area, does have fewer and fewer fawns and more males than females. This is nature's efficient way of handling the situation.
NEWS
October 21, 1990
WOODBRIDGE, Va. (AP) -- Officials at Mason Neck Wildlife Refuge in Northern Virginia say a six-day bow hunt last week was held to trim the deer population, but animal-rights activists said it was a "veiled excuse" for recreational hunting."
NEWS
By Julian L. Simon | August 25, 1994
Chevy Chase -- THE ROMAN Catholic Church's reaction to next month's United Nations Population Fund conference in Cairo is a monumental political blunder.The Vatican should not have mentioned abortion and contraception. It should have stuck to the subject of the conference -- population control.Pope John Paul II could simply have said that human life is the ultimate value and that interfering with reproductive liberty is a crime. But the church, like its critics, is drawn to the abortion wars like a moth to a flame.
NEWS
By GREGORY MILLMAN | October 19, 1994
New York -- The recent international conference in Cairo generated acrimonious debate about the means used to control population growth. Yet the world now faces an entirely new population crisis caused in part by the success of population control. The World Bank calls it ''the old-age crisis,'' and it's hitting the developing world harder than anywhere else.''Rising life expectancy and declining fertility -- welcome indications that development is working -- also mean that the proportion of old people in the general population is growing very fast, particularly in many developing countries,'' World Bank chief economist Michael Bruno warns.
NEWS
By Kristi E. Swartz and Kristi E. Swartz,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 24, 1997
Deer will run free in Sandy Point State Park this winter, a victory for animal rights activists who think the ban on hunting will be permanent, despite statements to the contrary from state officials.What Maryland Department of Natural Resources officials are saying is that hunting has been banned temporarily while the best way to control deer populations in all the state's suburban parks is studied.That will take 18 months. No plan has been devised for the study, and no one knows how many deer are in the parks.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | February 4, 2001
WASHINGTON -- It is intriguing to try to follow President Bush's reasoning, although sometimes you could get whiplash from the U-turns. For example, he's getting heat from critics who say his proposals to fund religiously affiliated programs may violate constitutional separations between church and state. Mr. Bush argues that, oh, no, the administration can install safeguards to make sure public money goes only to the purpose that the government intends. Wasn't that the argument that population-control groups made when Mr. Bush objected to federal funds they were receiving for their birth-control work overseas?
NEWS
June 21, 2011
I immigrated to the United States more than 50 years ago. I served in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War. I pay taxes, and I love this country. It saddens me that there are so many people without a job; although I am not an economist, I would like to say something about the economy as an ordinary citizen. Corporate America is making record profits; they have transferred their business to China, India, Brazil and other developing countries where profits are higher since workers in those places have lower salaries than our workers here.
NEWS
September 8, 2003
IT IS WITH MUCH reluctance that we quarrel with animal rights advocates. Often they play a crucial role in blowing the whistle on heartbreaking cruelty visited on all manner of creatures by thoughtless or venal humans. But in the case of Maryland's mute swans, they are off-base. Their crusade to block the state from killing some swans as part of a broader program to control their rapidly expanding population is based on a narrow, sentimental perspective in denial of obvious facts. U.S. District Judge Emmet G. Sullivan, who is hearing arguments in the case, should end the delaying tactics and let state officials get about their work.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | February 4, 2001
WASHINGTON -- It is intriguing to try to follow President Bush's reasoning, although sometimes you could get whiplash from the U-turns. For example, he's getting heat from critics who say his proposals to fund religiously affiliated programs may violate constitutional separations between church and state. Mr. Bush argues that, oh, no, the administration can install safeguards to make sure public money goes only to the purpose that the government intends. Wasn't that the argument that population-control groups made when Mr. Bush objected to federal funds they were receiving for their birth-control work overseas?
NEWS
By Ian Timberlake and Ian Timberlake,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 20, 1999
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- For Akwet Lim, 54, a sign painter in Glodok, Jakarta's Chinatown, Chinese New Year means a visit to the temple, with its smoky, sweet incense and burning red candles. This year, his prayer was simple."I want peace," he says. "I am afraid."Last May, he had to flee from his shop and hide in an army barracks with his wife and three children during three days of mob violence that left an estimated 1,200 people dead, dozens of Chinese women raped and thousands of buildings damaged.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1998
Maryland's new deer management plan, which divided the state into four hunting regions with independent bag limits for bow, muzzleloader and firearms hunters, is intended to "tailor" the deer kill according to the need for population control.In most parts of the state, the aim is toward thinning the number of breeders by emphasizing the hunt for antlerless deer. In far Western Maryland, however, the management goal is to maintain the deer population near present levels and antlered/antlerless ratio.
NEWS
By Kristi E. Swartz and Kristi E. Swartz,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 24, 1997
Deer will run free in Sandy Point State Park this winter, a victory for animal rights activists who think the ban on hunting will be permanent, despite statements to the contrary from state officials.What Maryland Department of Natural Resources officials are saying is that hunting has been banned temporarily while the best way to control deer populations in all the state's suburban parks is studied.That will take 18 months. No plan has been devised for the study, and no one knows how many deer are in the parks.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Staff Writer Staff writer Michael A. Fletcher contributed to this article | February 3, 1993
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke yesterday defended his health commissioner, Dr. Peter L. Beilenson, who came under fire Monday night at a City Council hearing for his controversial proposal to offer the contraceptive Norplant to teen-age girls."
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1997
According to state wildlife managers, there are more deer in Maryland now than at any other time in history, with population estimates ranging from 250,000 to more than 300,000 -- and unless a more effective deer management plan is implemented soon, those numbers likely will increase dramatically.The Department of Natural Resources completed a series of public meetings last week in which possible revisions to the management plan were discussed and public suggestions for improvements were invited.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1997
According to state wildlife managers, there are more deer in Maryland now than at any other time in history, with population estimates ranging from 250,000 to more than 300,000 -- and unless a more effective deer management plan is implemented soon, those numbers likely will increase dramatically.The Department of Natural Resources completed a series of public meetings last week in which possible revisions to the management plan were discussed and public suggestions for improvements were invited.
NEWS
November 24, 1996
WHEN THE Department of Natural Resources is involved, very often its solution is to kill the animals. The Sun's Nov. 16 editorial has now taken a typical DNR approach, advocating ill-conceived and cruel managed deer hunts.DNR's deer-killing philosophy is both ineffective and inhumane. It fails to recognize that deer exercise a population control of their own. If the deer population increases in a given area, does have fewer and fewer fawns and more males than females. This is nature's efficient way of handling the situation.
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