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By Brent Jones | brent.jones@baltsun.com | March 22, 2010
Overall population has declined in Baltimore since 2000, although some communities have flourished, according to Vital Signs, an occasional report that charts trends in neighborhoods by a variety of measurements. The report analyzes data from 80 indicators provided by the city's planning department. About 270 city neighborhoods are broken down into census-tract boundaries, and while the city has lost about 3 percent of its residents since 2000, several communities have experienced a population boom, including downtown (22 percent growth)
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NEWS
October 5, 2014
The problem of feral cat overpopulation cannot be solved with trap, neuter and release programs ( "Cat that closed Glen Burnie school moved to animal rescue shelter," Sept. 5). Such initiatives merely repeat the irresponsible human behavior of dumping and abandonment that caused the problem in the first place. Municipalities that embrace TNR are encouraging more dumping and abandonment. Unfortunately, with approximately 80 million free-ranging cats in the U.S., no one will ever be able to sterilize enough of them to have any significant impact on cat populations.
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EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 7, 2013
On April 16, leaders from county and state agencies, the court system and elected officials met for a briefing regarding the increasing number of seniors in Harford County, and the community support families need to care for older family members. Harford County Executive David R. Craig spearheaded the Aging Summit, focusing on the needs of vulnerable senior adults in Harford County. The summit was held in partnership with the Harford County State Attorney Joe Cassilly and the Harford County Sheriff Jesse Bane.
NEWS
September 20, 2014
It may be reasonable to be prepared in case Ebola presents in the U.S., but would our population not do better to listen to rational information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other authoritative sources? Flu presents a real, proven threat to health, life and productivity in the U.S. ( "The Ebola threat," Sept. 16) We would do well to have our flu shot before concerning ourselves with a less-easily-contracted illness which has no record of originating here.
NEWS
December 26, 2011
If I drove around Baltimore long enough, I probably could find enough discarded wrapping blowing along the streets to wrap all our family's holiday gifts. In the best-case scenario, all this trash came out of someone's uncovered recycling bin; in the worst case, it's from someone unwrapping presents in a car or outside their home and throwing it in the street. In Baltimore, either of these is a possibility, and because of this and other uninviting features of city it will be hard to add 10,000 new residents over any period of time.
NEWS
January 11, 2012
I'd love to see Baltimore grow, and if immigrants are the answer that's fine with me, as long as they're here legally ("Immigrants key to reaching mayor's population goal," Jan. 9). Yet no matter how hard the mayor tries to increase population, it will be meaningless unless there are good jobs. It's fine Elsa Garcia's husband found some construction work, but it doesn't sound like full-time employment to me. Why is no one suggesting a greater emphasis on vocational training in our schools?
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2013
Baltimore's challenge challenge to the 2010 Census count netted the city a small population bump. Instead of being home to 620,961 people on April 1, 2010, as the U.S. Census Bureau reported in 2011, Baltimore actually had 621,074 residents - an increase of 113 people, federal records show. That's a far smaller increase than Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and other Baltimore officials had hoped for. The city's planning department argued in its appeal that census workers did not count 15,635 housing units in Baltimore.
NEWS
December 1, 2011
Peter DuVall's column regarding Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's policy goal of increasing the population of the city is well done ("Grow city's population, but don't stop there," Nov. 28). It gently chastises the mayor for lacking detail. He is right . But the simplicity of the mayor's goal does not make it wrong. I have written several times about the value of establishing the goal of increasing the population of the city. As the column correctly points out, the city has lost population in the last 50-plus years.
NEWS
May 7, 2014
As I have written before, no one will mention one of the major solutions to the problem of preserving the state's crab population, which I believe stems from a fear of offending the commercial waterman ( "Singing the blues," May 5). At least five years ago recreational crabbers had our catches reduced from two bushels to one, a 50 percent reduction. Nor can recreational crabbers any longer keep female crabs. Yet commercial crabbers are still allowed to catch and keep female crabs, and their catches haven't been reduced by half.
NEWS
By Olivia Bobrowsky and Olivia Bobrowsky,olivia.bobrowsky@baltsun.com | July 1, 2009
Baltimore's population continues to drop, losing 3,231 people during the year that ended July 1, 2008, according to new census estimates released Wednesday. Except for a small uptick in 2006, the city's population has been on a half-century decline. The most recent census figures put Baltimore's population at 636,919. The number is an estimate, calculated by using data from the 2000 census and taking into account births, deaths and immigration. City leaders have annually disputed the census' initial estimates, arguing the numbers are too low. The preliminary count for 2007 was 637,455, but the bureau readjusted the figure to 640,150.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake plans to unveil dozens of recommendations Wednesday intended to lure immigrant families to Baltimore and retain them. The proposals, from increasing the availability of translators at city agencies to making it easier for the undocumented to buy homes, offer insight into the mayor's pledge to attract 10,000 new families over the next decade - an effort that is focused in part on the city's burgeoning immigrant neighborhoods. "I want to make sure that Baltimore isn't behind the curve on this trend," said Rawlings-Blake, who will formally announce the recommendations today.
NEWS
By Ellen B. Cutler | September 9, 2014
Note to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service: There are too many deer. And I say this as a softie who loves watching them wander in my yard and who has evolved gardening practices that focus on "deer-resistant" species and a philosophical outlook that accommodates inevitable damage. We've watched the deer and tossed them dried corn and old apples (yes I know feeding the wildlife is frowned upon) since we moved into this recent expansion of our smallish town that is really part of the exurbia of Baltimore.
NEWS
July 19, 2014
The children flooding our borders are being cared for as no other country has ever cared for a population that illegally entered it. They are being fed and housed and cleansed of many diseases we had thought eradicated in this country years ago. They have, for the most part, come here and surrendered, hoping to be reunited with parents or relatives after having been given a "permiso" from our government. A huge lie has been fed to them. The president wants $3.7 billion to care for them and to keep them here.
NEWS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
As baby boomers ebb out of the workforce and into retirement, financial advisers are helping wind down their clients' careers by preparing them for soon-to-be-reduced incomes. Meet Cyndi Hutchins, Bank of America Merrill Lynch's director of financial gerontology — one of the country's first such positions at a financial management firm. Her recent appointment marks the company's first foray into the science of aging. Hutchins works with other Merrill Lynch financial advisers to manage their clients' transitions into retirement.
NEWS
July 8, 2014
A recent article described the efforts of young people to escape poverty and terror in Central America and seek refuge in the United States. There are those who argue that we should stem this flow of refugees and send those in our borders back to where they came from. I say, nonsense, welcome as many as we can, count ourselves fortunate that so many resourceful young people are clamoring to come to our shores, grant them asylum, a good education and watch our economy blossom ( "A call for compassion ," June 28)
NEWS
June 28, 2014
Kudos to Richard Hall for his commentary entitled "Redevelop Md.'s future" (June 26). It echoes what I have been saying for the past 25 years or so. Better to increase the infill development in places where there is already infrastructure in place than continue to extend development farther and farther away from existing population centers. Stated simply, the goal should be to increase the population of existing population centers. That may be complex to implement and achieve but nonetheless desirable and attainable.
NEWS
By Patrick Chisholm | December 22, 2006
Recently, the population of the United States reached an estimated 300 million, according to the Census Bureau. In four decades, it is projected to reach 400 million, with immigration the biggest factor driving that growth. More people means greater strains on the environment, and potentially greater strains on the economy. Given that the immigration juggernaut seems politically unstoppable, how can the United States absorb more people while maintaining its quality of life? The key is to increase our land's carrying capacity - the population level that a particular geographic area can support.
NEWS
By Ben Wattenberg | November 20, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Finally, after all these years of demographic doom-saying, population proliferationism and exponential extrapolated explosionism, comes a new report from the United Nations and a headline in the New York Times: ''World Is Less Crowded Than Expected.''Really? Than expected by whom? Than expected when?Apparently, not expected when it should have been expected by Joseph Chamie, director of the United Nations Population Division, who is quoted in the Times story: ''We had some glimmer that this was occurring several years ago, but we weren't sure if it was simply a blip.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
The movie "Jaws" was released 39 years ago this month so by now we're certain it's more than safe to go back in the water. Or is it? Over the weekend, a fisherman off the coast of Cape May, N.J., had a semi-pleasant (no one died) encounter with a great white shark that came snooping near the man's 35-foot boat. The 16-foot shark hung around about 20 minutes, according to Steve Clark, the vessel's owner, and didn't leave without getting a taste of a bait bag filled with chum that was hanging from the boat.
NEWS
By Michael Hild | May 27, 2014
It's no secret that the health of the Chesapeake Bay has been in peril for decades, but ocean acidification poses what may be the greatest threat to the oyster population of the bay. Sadly, for most people this will go unnoticed. It's not like the obvious environmental threat of trees being cut or land being bulldozed. Damage occurring to oysters and other aquatic species can't be seen from a casual observation of the surface, but the threat is real. With water covering so much of the earth's surface it's easy enough for people to think that our waters can handle whatever we pour into them, but nothing could be further from the truth.
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