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By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2012
Three Republican presidential candidates — Rick Santorum, Ron Paul and Newt Gingrich — are preparing to plant a flag in Maryland ahead of the state's April 3 primary, offering GOP voters here a rare chance to take part in a national political battle. Local campaign officials said they expect candidates will swing through the state early next week, following Saturday's primary in Louisiana. Maryland, which has 37 delegates to offer, votes the same day as Washington, D.C., and Wisconsin.
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NEWS
December 3, 2012
The passage of Maryland's marriage equality law this year was recognized by many readers as having been the most significant news event of 2012, and they suggested several people who were deserving of recognition as Marylander of the Year for their role in seeing it enacted. To represent them, we chose Del. Maggie McIntosh. Without her effort, marriage equality would not have passed either in the legislature or at the ballot box. She also had a pretty decent year as chairwoman of the House Environmental Matters Committee.
NEWS
November 20, 1994
In recent days, five potential candidates for president in 1996 have hinted of their ambitions. And that's just among the Democrats. There are 19 -- count 'em -- 19 Republicans mentioned as possible presidential nominees in the next election.It's clear why Democrats are so restless and Republicans so eager. President Clinton, who in 1992 got the smallest share (43 percent) of the popular vote of any successful Democratic presidential candidate in 80 years, has now led his party through an election in which its candidates for Congress got the smallest share of the popular vote (49 percent)
NEWS
December 1, 2012
I feel compelled to respond to the Democrats' continual gloating and condescension concerning the 2012 election typified by Raymond Hoff's recent letter to the editor ("Republicans make themselves easy to beat," Nov. 24). Perhaps if would be more useful to focus not on why Republicans lost, but why Democrats won. One illustrative fact is that while President Barack Obama won slightly more than 50 percent of the popular vote, 62 percent of people interviewed in exit polls stated that the country was on the wrong track.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | December 4, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Following the Florida controversy over vote counts, recounts and court challenges, calls are being heard for an overhaul in the process to determine future presidential winners. They range from demands for more efficient voting machines to uniformity of ballots and counting procedures and standards. While the country may not have been faced with a real constitutional crisis in the Bush-Gore standoff in Florida, it has been obliged to endure a sometimes bewildering, often maddening round of maneuverings, legal and political, by both camps.
FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2000
He was the son of a former president, sharing his father's first name, although their middle names were different. He had just won the most bitterly divided presidential election in history, losing the popular vote but prevailing after a series of wrenching decisions. "Fellow-citizens," he said in his inauguration speech, "you are acquainted with the peculiar circumstances of the recent election, which have resulted in affording me the opportunity of addressing you at this time. ... Less possessed of your confidence in advance than any of my predecessors, I am deeply conscious of the prospect that I shall stand more and oftener in need of your indulgence."
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | October 6, 1992
This is the 52nd presidential election.The 32nd was held in 1912. For the first time, preferential primaries were a feature of presidential elections. Progressive Republicans, upset with the conservatism of President William Howard Taft, urged former President Theodore Roosevelt to challenge his protege.TR was eager to. He won nine state primaries to Taft's one, but the incumbent president controlled the party regulars and was easily nominated at the tightly controlled convention. Later TR was nominated as the candidate of the Progressive Party.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | November 7, 2012
Maryland's vote for same-sex marriage and the Dream Act runs counter to history, political science and human nature — a majority of citizens upholding laws that benefit distinct minorities. I think a little more attention must be paid to this. I find it extraordinary. Put to a popular vote, the civil rights of gay and lesbian couples to marry had been shot down 32 times in states across the nation, proof of the majority's power to limit the rights of a minority group or even oppress it. This has been referred to as the "tyranny of the majority.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | April 13, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Ross Perot is all the rage right now. One day the 61-year-old billionaire is holding forth on "Larry King Live!" on CNN, another on "60 Minutes" on CBS, still another before the annual meeting of the American Society of Newspaper Editor. A Gallup Poll finds him with one-fouth of the vote in a hypothetical matchup against President Bush and the Democratic nominee-presumptive, Gov. Bill Clinton, despite the fact that more than half the poll respondents can't identify Perot accurately.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 14, 2000
WASHINGTON - A landslide it wasn't. By at least one measure, George Walker Bush's election was a triumph of historic proportions: the narrowest victory in a presidential contest since the early 1800s. The number of votes needed to change the outcome was the smallest since the current system of popularly electing presidents began in 1828, according to a soon-to-be published paper by James E. Campbell, a University of Buffalo political scientist. Up to now, the closest finish was the 1876 election, which turned on about 400 votes in South Carolina.
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