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By Theo Lippman Jr | October 6, 1992
This is the 52nd presidential election.The 32nd was held in 1912. For the first time, preferential primaries were a feature of presidential elections. Progressive Republicans, upset with the conservatism of President William Howard Taft, urged former President Theodore Roosevelt to challenge his protege.TR was eager to. He won nine state primaries to Taft's one, but the incumbent president controlled the party regulars and was easily nominated at the tightly controlled convention. Later TR was nominated as the candidate of the Progressive Party.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: PLEBISCITE Last year in Maryland, petition drives succeeded in putting on the ballot proposals to repeal laws passed by the General Assembly, including legalization of same-sex marriage. The repeal efforts failed. This year, efforts to reverse the abolition of the death penalty and restrictions on firearms failed to garner enough signatures to get repeals on the ballot.
NEWS
By Rob Richie and Steven Hill | January 2, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Americans are assessing the aftermath of a presidential roller coaster ride. Election 2000, in which George W. Bush was elected president despite losing the popular vote by more than 300,000, bolsters long-standing calls for changing how we elect our president. According to a recent Washington Post-ABC News poll, about six in 10 Americans say they want to abolish the Electoral College and select the president by direct popular vote. But this will be difficult to accomplish, since it requires a constitutional amendment and support from three-quarters of the state legislatures and two-thirds of the U.S. House and Senate.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | November 11, 2000
THOSE WHO believe, correctly, that the 21st century starts Jan. 1, 2001, can justifiably call the presidential race that culminated four days ago "the election of the century." As late as last night, no official winner had been declared. The Florida vote was still in contention, and neither Republican George W. Bush nor Democrat Al Gore had been named president-elect. While we wait, it's nice to engage in a little post-election reflection. Several things come to mind: Most idiotic pre-Election Day statement: The honor goes to Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. of Illinois, who, as a guest on "The Chris Rock Show," brazenly told Rock and the audience that if Bush were elected and subsequently appointed conservative justices to the Supreme Court, blacks would be riding in the backs of buses again within a year.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | November 7, 2012
Maryland's vote for same-sex marriage and the Dream Act runs counter to history, political science and human nature — a majority of citizens upholding laws that benefit distinct minorities. I think a little more attention must be paid to this. I find it extraordinary. Put to a popular vote, the civil rights of gay and lesbian couples to marry had been shot down 32 times in states across the nation, proof of the majority's power to limit the rights of a minority group or even oppress it. This has been referred to as the "tyranny of the majority.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2004
Don't look now, but the political stars might be aligning to put the candidate who loses the popular vote into the White House once again. This time around, though, it might be the Democrat taking advantage of the odd institution known as the Electoral College. Tom Schaller, a political scientist at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, has been touting this scenario since spring: John Kerry takes the populous states that went for Al Gore in 2000 - that's where Gore piled up his 500,000-vote margin over George W. Bush - but in much tighter races.
NEWS
December 30, 2000
QUESTION OF THE MONTH? December's question asked readers whether they supported the Electoral College system and how they would reform the way we select our president. How should we choose our president? Small states still need protection The 2000 presidential election was a perfect example that the Electoral College system works. Our Founding Fathers developed it so that a "regional majority" could not sway the outcome. Had Vice President Al Gore Won the election, based on his slim popular vote margin, he would have been a candidate selected by a regional majority, mostly a handful of cities.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | August 24, 1995
Paris. -- The public attention accorded Sen. Bill Bradley's retirement from the Senate and availability as an independent presidential candidate is both justified and a warning of just how ''broken'' (to use the senator's word) the American political system is.It would be near-miracle for an independent candidate next year actually to win. If it did happen, would it make any difference? Mr. Bradley put it very well. The system is broken. Unless you fix it, electing an independent will change nothing.
NEWS
By Paul Rogat Loeb | May 29, 2008
Given the bitterness of so many Hillary Clinton supporters that the woman they thought would be America's first female president will not be, the more they hear the suggestion that Sen. Barack Obama's win is illegitimate, the more likely they are to bolt. If Senator Clinton's voters embrace the story that "a man took it away from a woman," denying her a victory she deserved, they're at risk of staying home come November, or holding back from the volunteering and get-out-the-vote efforts necessary for the Democrats to prevail.
NEWS
September 20, 2004
REGARDLESS OF what might be said in defense of awarding the presidency to a candidate who came in second in the popular vote, the practice creates such hard feelings it would be best if it didn't happen again. And yet the country seems to be just as divided this year as it was when George W. Bush depended on the Electoral College (after agonizing rounds of recounts) to install him in the White House four years ago. Political analysts believe it could well remain that way for a decade or more.
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