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NEWS
October 3, 2012
Your editorial was spot on regarding the current presidential campaign ("It's not over yet," Oct. 1). If one were to believe the current polls, President Barack Obama has already won the election and there's no need for anyone to vote. That obviously is far from the truth, because a poll is simply a snapshot in time and subject to daily change. I recall the historic presidential election of 1948, when the polls overwhelmingly favored a landslide victory for Gov. Thomas E. Dewey over incumbent president Harry S. Truman.
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NEWS
December 3, 2012
The passage of Maryland's marriage equality law this year was recognized by many readers as having been the most significant news event of 2012, and they suggested several people who were deserving of recognition as Marylander of the Year for their role in seeing it enacted. To represent them, we chose Del. Maggie McIntosh. Without her effort, marriage equality would not have passed either in the legislature or at the ballot box. She also had a pretty decent year as chairwoman of the House Environmental Matters Committee.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau Chief | November 4, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Democratic Gov. Bill Clinton of Arkansas smashed the Republican lock on the White House yesterday, opening the door to a new generation of national leadership.President Bush fell victim to deep-seated voter anger over the economy, becoming the seventh president in history to lose a re-election race. With final returns still to be counted, Mr. Bush appeared headed for the worst defeat in the popular vote for any incumbent president since 1912.The man who did more than anyone else to stoke the anti-politician fires this year, Ross Perot, finished third.
FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2000
He was the son of a former president, sharing his father's first name, although their middle names were different. He had just won the most bitterly divided presidential election in history, losing the popular vote but prevailing after a series of wrenching decisions. "Fellow-citizens," he said in his inauguration speech, "you are acquainted with the peculiar circumstances of the recent election, which have resulted in affording me the opportunity of addressing you at this time. ... Less possessed of your confidence in advance than any of my predecessors, I am deeply conscious of the prospect that I shall stand more and oftener in need of your indulgence."
NEWS
December 1, 2012
I feel compelled to respond to the Democrats' continual gloating and condescension concerning the 2012 election typified by Raymond Hoff's recent letter to the editor ("Republicans make themselves easy to beat," Nov. 24). Perhaps if would be more useful to focus not on why Republicans lost, but why Democrats won. One illustrative fact is that while President Barack Obama won slightly more than 50 percent of the popular vote, 62 percent of people interviewed in exit polls stated that the country was on the wrong track.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | November 7, 2012
Maryland's vote for same-sex marriage and the Dream Act runs counter to history, political science and human nature — a majority of citizens upholding laws that benefit distinct minorities. I think a little more attention must be paid to this. I find it extraordinary. Put to a popular vote, the civil rights of gay and lesbian couples to marry had been shot down 32 times in states across the nation, proof of the majority's power to limit the rights of a minority group or even oppress it. This has been referred to as the "tyranny of the majority.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | October 6, 1992
This is the 52nd presidential election.The 32nd was held in 1912. For the first time, preferential primaries were a feature of presidential elections. Progressive Republicans, upset with the conservatism of President William Howard Taft, urged former President Theodore Roosevelt to challenge his protege.TR was eager to. He won nine state primaries to Taft's one, but the incumbent president controlled the party regulars and was easily nominated at the tightly controlled convention. Later TR was nominated as the candidate of the Progressive Party.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: PLEBISCITE Last year in Maryland, petition drives succeeded in putting on the ballot proposals to repeal laws passed by the General Assembly, including legalization of same-sex marriage. The repeal efforts failed. This year, efforts to reverse the abolition of the death penalty and restrictions on firearms failed to garner enough signatures to get repeals on the ballot.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | December 4, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Following the Florida controversy over vote counts, recounts and court challenges, calls are being heard for an overhaul in the process to determine future presidential winners. They range from demands for more efficient voting machines to uniformity of ballots and counting procedures and standards. While the country may not have been faced with a real constitutional crisis in the Bush-Gore standoff in Florida, it has been obliged to endure a sometimes bewildering, often maddening round of maneuverings, legal and political, by both camps.
NEWS
By Rob Richie and Steven Hill | January 2, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Americans are assessing the aftermath of a presidential roller coaster ride. Election 2000, in which George W. Bush was elected president despite losing the popular vote by more than 300,000, bolsters long-standing calls for changing how we elect our president. According to a recent Washington Post-ABC News poll, about six in 10 Americans say they want to abolish the Electoral College and select the president by direct popular vote. But this will be difficult to accomplish, since it requires a constitutional amendment and support from three-quarters of the state legislatures and two-thirds of the U.S. House and Senate.
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