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By MIKE LITTWIN | May 1, 1994
A bad thing happened to me the other day. I heard "Kicks" on the radio, and then for the next five minutes I tried to come up with another Paul Revere and the Raiders song. Any Paul Revere and the Raiders song.And I couldn't.Of course, I panicked. Anybody would. This may not seem like the worst thing in the world, except it might be the Young Rascals next. And then where would I be?The business of getting, well, not so young anymore is harder than I expected.This hit home pretty hard the other week when all the talk was of Kurt Cobain.
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By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2013
Deep in the cellar beneath the Recher Theatre , Buddy Hilsberg curates a museum of sorts. He's got boxes filled with the silly rider demands of every band that's headlined the Towson club. He's saved pieces of wall signed by everyone from Paul Reed Smith to the English Beat to Dick Dale. He's even got the autographs of bus drivers who brought all these musicians to play. "It's history to me," said the silver-haired manager who's been with the York Road concert hall since it opened 17 years ago. And it's history for everyone else now, too, as the Recher, one of Maryland's smallest but best known live music venues, held its last concert Sunday.
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FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt | October 1, 1995
AMERICANS COMPLAIN constantly about the quality and content of their popular music. It is said to be vulgar, vicious, venal, cheap, superficial, noisy and inimical to the moral progress of society. In every decade from ragtime to rap, the verdict has been the same: Pop music is ruining the country.Yet here's the strange thing: From the earliest days of sheet music and piano rolls to the era of digital compact discs, those same complaining Americans continue to buy pop music in staggering quantities -- and so does much of the rest of the world.
EXPLORE
February 27, 2013
Music is a special part of services at Temple Adas Shalom, The Harford Jewish Center. The Temple will be featuring an evening of liturgical and popular music by its choir. There will be songs from the entire choir, soloists and duets. The program will include some melodious liturgical music along with songs that are familiar to everyone. After the concert, a supper will be served including a variety of deli sandwiches, salads, desserts and beverages. The concert will be Sunday, March 17 at 5 p.m. at the Temple, 8 N. Earlton Road, Havre de Grace, just above I-95 and Level Road.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 6, 2000
Because Anglo-American pop so completely dominates the airwaves in North America and Europe, it's easy to assume that the American Top 40 rules the world. Not so. Even though Madonna and Backstreet Boys CDs can be found almost anywhere on earth, the truth is that our music is far from the universal language. In East Asia, in fact, Japanese popular music is the dominant taste, influencing teens from Taiwan to Thailand. It's also beginning to make inroads into the American market, riding the coattails of such youth-culture enthusiasms as Japanimation and video games.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | April 20, 1997
What defines a city's musical identity is its clubs. It's not just a matter of taking a town's musical pulse; it has to do with expressing an attitude and defining a style.Maybe that's why the best-known clubs carry a cachet that goes well beyond whoever happens to be playing there at the moment. Think of CBGB's in New York, the Marquee in London, the Troubador in Los Angeles.Think of Hammerjacks.From its spot on South Howard Street beneath the Interstate 395 overpass, Hammerjacks has defined the Baltimore popular music scene for almost a dozen years.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | May 27, 2011
James Richard Kopelke, a retired educator whose Jim's Sentimental Journeys sing-alongs entertained senior citizens at retirement communities, died May 19 of a heart attack at his home in Webster, N.Y. The longtime Timonium resident had celebrated his 78th birthday three days earlier. Born in Aurora, Ill., Mr. Kopelke moved with his family to Catonsville in 1942, when his father took a job at the old Emerson Farm Dairy in Brooklandville. He was a 1951 graduate of Catonsville High School and served in the Army until 1953.
NEWS
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | April 20, 1997
What defines a city's musical identity is its clubs. It's not just a matter of taking a town's musical pulse; it has to do with expressing an attitude and defining a style.Maybe that's why the best-known clubs carry a cachet that goes well beyond whoever happens to be playing there at the moment. Think of CBGB's in New York, the Marquee in London, the Troubador in Los Angeles.Think of Hammerjacks.From its spot on South Howard Street beneath the Interstate 395 overpass, Hammerjacks has defined the Baltimore popular music scene for almost a dozen years.
TOPIC
By Crispin Sartwell | August 27, 2000
Popular music entered this year's presidential election early, when John McCain claimed during the primaries that his favorite band was Nine Inch Nails. Now NIN, which consists more or less entirely of the Prince of Cool, Trent Reznor, plays postmodern, postindustrial, post-satanic thrash. Reznor's approach underlies the music of bands such as Korn and P.O.D. as well as the personal styles of hundreds of thousands of tattooed and pierced youngsters. Suffice it to say that Nine Inch Nails is not what you'd expect to find on the playlist of a United States senator.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 10, 2000
In popular music, we tend to think of our greatest artists as originals. Be it Chuck Berry or Bob Dylan, the Beatles or James Brown, it's much easier to think of artists who've imitated these greats than it is to name acts they've copied. Pearl Jam is a perfect example. From Stone Temple Pilots to Creed, there are plenty of alt-rock acts that owe at least a little of their sound to the Seattle-based quintet. But is there a similar source for Pearl Jam? Not that I can tell. Most of the acts that emerged during the Seattle grunge boom of the early '90s fell into one of two camps, hewing either toward the clangorous punk of Nirvana or the neo-metal of Soundgarden or Alice in Chains.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2011
Jon Ehrens is five years younger than his sister Emily. It might not seem too important now that they're both adults, but when you're a kid, that's a big gap. Which is why, even though they came from a musical family, the two never really had much success as a band. But last year, when Ehrens began recording '80s-influenced synth-pop songs as White Life, he realized he needed a female singer. He tried a few people around Baltimore, but none stuck. His parents had suggested Ehrens and Emily collaborate, but he worried about the complications of mixing family and music.
EXPLORE
By Joan Spicknalldirector@suzukimusicschool.com | June 30, 2011
Can music education programs survive and prosper in today's economic climate? The answer is yes, if … There are many variables contributing to that conclusion, and when a certain number of them combine, a positive outcome is sure to result. To begin with, let's establish the premise that "every student in the nation should have an education in the arts. " This quote is the opening statement from "The Value and Quality of Arts Education: A Statement of Principles," which was collectively written and endorsed by the nation's 10 most important educational organizations, including the American Association of School Administrators, the National Education Association, the National Parent Teachers Association and the National School Boards Association.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2011
James Richard Kopelke, a retired educator whose Jim's Sentimental Journeys sing-alongs entertained residents of retirement communities, died May 19 of a heart attack at his home in Webster, N.Y. The longtime Timonium resident had celebrated his 78th birthday three days earlier. Born in Aurora, Ill., Mr. Kopelke moved with his family to Catonsville in 1942, when his father took a job at the old Emerson Farm Dairy in Brooklandville. He was a 1951 graduate of Catonsville High School and served in the Army until 1953.
NEWS
August 7, 2010
Sunday, Aug. 8 'The Last Days of Judas Iscariot' The Dignity Players perform this comedy about Jesus' infamous betrayer at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Annapolis, 333 Dubois Road. Performances at 3 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 8; 8 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 12 through Saturday, Aug. 14. Tickets are $15-$20. Call 410-266-8044, ext. 127 or go to dignityplayers.org. Cocker Spaniel Adoption Day The Oldies But Goodies Cocker Spaniel Rescue group will hold an adoption day, noon to 3 p.m. at the Annapolis Petsmart, 2601 Housley Road, Annapolis.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | July 25, 2008
Tracy Turnblad will dance again. Baltimore's scribe of the salacious, John Waters, confirmed yesterday that he has been asked to start work on a sequel to Hairspray, his story of big hair and integrated dance halls that became the surprise movie musical hit of 2007. "I am just beginning to think about it," said Waters, adding he signed the deal with New Line Cinema, a Warner Bros. subsidiary, within the past two weeks. "I'm just figuring out what it is." Waters, who doesn't like to talk about any of his projects in advance, suspects most of the characters from the original Hairspray will return.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | June 24, 2007
What if the killers of today's mean streets knew they were taking the life of a Beethoven or a Brahms or a Rimsky-Korsakov? Could anyone take a life after hearing Scheherazade? If the shooter knew his action might deny the world such sublime melodies, would he still pull the trigger? In some cases, to be sure, music wouldn't make a particle of difference. I knew this even as I wrote recently that classical music might incline some toward less-violent problem-solving. Some readers were willing to consider the possibility, referring to the oft-heard quotation, originated by 17th-century dramatist William Congreve, that "music has charms to soothe a savage breast."
FEATURES
December 26, 1993
In the arts, as with life, a year's activity is filled with highlights and lowlights, successes and failures, encouraging themes and disappointing trends. This year was no different, Here, our critics assess the year in popular music, movies, televiion, classical music, theater, art, dance and architicture.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | April 25, 2007
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's annual SummerFest will emphasize lighter classics and popular music this year. The festival opens with a showing of the screen classic The Wizard of Oz. The BSO, led by Constantine Kitsopoulos, will perform the soundtrack in these concerts June 21 and 22 at the Music Center at Strathmore and June 23 at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. A cirque theme will find a troupe of acrobats, aerialists and more sharing the stage when Andrew Constantine conducts such works as Khachaturian's Sabre Dance and Dvorak's Carnival on July 12 at Strathmore and July 13 at Meyerhoff.
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