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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 23, 2001
JERUSALEM - The Palestinian Authority, in a rare and risky move against a prominent radical, said yesterday that it intends to hunt down and arrest the head of the militant group that took responsibility for the assassination last week of an Israeli Cabinet member. If Palestinian officials are serious about going after Ahmed Saadat, the newly elected secretary-general of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, it could spark turmoil among radical militias and their growing legions of followers.
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FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | December 28, 2007
No one puts more burdens on movie artists than Americans do. We coerce them into an increasingly pressurized system that rewards only commercial success - and determines that success on a film's box-office take in a single weekend. Critics urge them to be topical, yet not at the expense of art, and want directors to be "experimental," even if that limits popular support. The Holy Grail for American moviemakers - producing a movie that unites every portion of the audience, such as The Godfather or The Right Stuff - seems to recede into the mist as viewership grows more fragmented and "niche-oriented" with every passing season.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 26, 2001
BEIT RIMA, West Bank - This is a farming village with one main road, one general store and one common allegiance, to an outlawed Palestinian faction. It is a hamlet built on ruins from the Iron Age and where goods are still bartered and wealth is still measured in jugs of olive oil. Israeli authorities say it also is the place where assassins plotted the killing of a Cabinet minister. A political undercurrent runs through this scattering of houses. The sympathy is unstated but made obvious by the posters honoring the radical Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, or PFLP, outlawed by Israeli and Palestinian authorities.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Book Editor | May 1, 2005
The Breaking Point: Hemingway, Dos Passos, and the Murder of Jose Robles, by Stephen Koch. Counterpoint. 308 pages. $24.95. Ernest Hemingway and John Dos Passos were two of America's most luminous 20th-century novelists and, apparently, two of its notable dupes, too. That is the thesis of The Breaking Point, Stephen Koch's pungent mix of literary biography, history and international political thriller. The epicenter of his narrative is the Spanish Civil War, that warm-up for World War II that was also, Koch argues, a watershed in the diverging literary careers of Hemingway and Dos Passos.
NEWS
By Michael Wines XTC and Michael Wines XTC,New York Times News Service | October 10, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Newly uncovered evidence in the terrorist bombing of a Pan American jumbo jet in December 1988 indicates for the first time that Libyan intelligence agents may have assembled and planted the bomb that destroyed the plane, U.S. government investigators involved in the inquiry said this week.Until now the 2-year-old inquiry into the bombing over Lockerbie, Scotland, has focused on evidence that Iran hired a Syrian-sponsored terrorist group, the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine-General Command, to bomb a U.S. airliner in late 1988.
NEWS
By Laura LeCornu and Laura LeCornu,Contributing Writer | March 2, 1992
BAKU, Azerbaijan -- Armenian guerrillas attacked Azerbaijani settlements in Nagorno-Karabakh yesterday, with no signs of an end to the bloodletting after the reported slaughter of about 1,000 Azerbaijanis in the town of Hodjali on Wednesday.For the first time since Hodjali was captured, Azerbaijan television had a broadcast from Agdam, on the border of the enclave, showing truckloads of corpses and hundreds of refugees and wounded in scenes that are likely to spark violent public reaction in the capital.
NEWS
By John-Thor Dahlburg and John-Thor Dahlburg,Los Angeles Times | May 26, 1992
MOSCOW -- The Soviet Union bankrolled terrorism on a wide scale, including giving arms and munitions to Palestinian extremists to kill Americans and Israelis and to sabotage world trade in diamonds and oil, an adviser to President Boris N. Yeltsin said yesterday.Claiming to have the "smoking gun" proving the Communist Kremlin's long-suspected, but never documented, ties with international terror, Sergei M. Shakhrai, Mr. Yeltsin's top legal adviser, said that impounded Soviet Communist Party documents clearly showed that the party covertly aided "several dozen" foreign countries and organizations, among them the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Book Editor | May 1, 2005
The Breaking Point: Hemingway, Dos Passos, and the Murder of Jose Robles, by Stephen Koch. Counterpoint. 308 pages. $24.95. Ernest Hemingway and John Dos Passos were two of America's most luminous 20th-century novelists and, apparently, two of its notable dupes, too. That is the thesis of The Breaking Point, Stephen Koch's pungent mix of literary biography, history and international political thriller. The epicenter of his narrative is the Spanish Civil War, that warm-up for World War II that was also, Koch argues, a watershed in the diverging literary careers of Hemingway and Dos Passos.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 17, 1997
JERUSALEM -- The writing on the wall promised retribution.Red and menacing, the cursive Arabic script appeared in Jerusalem's Palestinian neighborhood of Ras al Amud on a December morning, 24 hours after Israeli officials approved construction of Jewish housing there."
NEWS
By Laura Le Cornu and Laura Le Cornu,Contributing Writer | March 6, 1992
BAKU, Azerbaijan -- Women wept, and men turned their heads away sadly as a film showing mutilated and dead bodies of young Azeri children and women flashed across the screen during an extraordinary session of the Azeri Parliament yesterday."
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 26, 2001
BEIT RIMA, West Bank - This is a farming village with one main road, one general store and one common allegiance, to an outlawed Palestinian faction. It is a hamlet built on ruins from the Iron Age and where goods are still bartered and wealth is still measured in jugs of olive oil. Israeli authorities say it also is the place where assassins plotted the killing of a Cabinet minister. A political undercurrent runs through this scattering of houses. The sympathy is unstated but made obvious by the posters honoring the radical Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, or PFLP, outlawed by Israeli and Palestinian authorities.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 23, 2001
JERUSALEM - The Palestinian Authority, in a rare and risky move against a prominent radical, said yesterday that it intends to hunt down and arrest the head of the militant group that took responsibility for the assassination last week of an Israeli Cabinet member. If Palestinian officials are serious about going after Ahmed Saadat, the newly elected secretary-general of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, it could spark turmoil among radical militias and their growing legions of followers.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 28, 2001
RAMALLAH, West Bank - A Palestinian police officer was surveying the rubble of his tiny police post yesterday, pondering Israel's logic of having used tanks to destroy what was little more than sandbags and plastic sheeting, when the distinct roar of Apache helicopters came from the sky. A moment later, two thunderous blasts shook the city. The helicopters quickly disappeared. Sirens wailed. Hundreds of people raced to a four-story apartment building, down the street from the compound of the Palestinian Authority.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 17, 1997
JERUSALEM -- The writing on the wall promised retribution.Red and menacing, the cursive Arabic script appeared in Jerusalem's Palestinian neighborhood of Ras al Amud on a December morning, 24 hours after Israeli officials approved construction of Jewish housing there."
NEWS
By John-Thor Dahlburg and John-Thor Dahlburg,Los Angeles Times | May 26, 1992
MOSCOW -- The Soviet Union bankrolled terrorism on a wide scale, including giving arms and munitions to Palestinian extremists to kill Americans and Israelis and to sabotage world trade in diamonds and oil, an adviser to President Boris N. Yeltsin said yesterday.Claiming to have the "smoking gun" proving the Communist Kremlin's long-suspected, but never documented, ties with international terror, Sergei M. Shakhrai, Mr. Yeltsin's top legal adviser, said that impounded Soviet Communist Party documents clearly showed that the party covertly aided "several dozen" foreign countries and organizations, among them the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine.
NEWS
By Laura Le Cornu and Laura Le Cornu,Contributing Writer | March 6, 1992
BAKU, Azerbaijan -- Women wept, and men turned their heads away sadly as a film showing mutilated and dead bodies of young Azeri children and women flashed across the screen during an extraordinary session of the Azeri Parliament yesterday."
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 28, 2001
RAMALLAH, West Bank - A Palestinian police officer was surveying the rubble of his tiny police post yesterday, pondering Israel's logic of having used tanks to destroy what was little more than sandbags and plastic sheeting, when the distinct roar of Apache helicopters came from the sky. A moment later, two thunderous blasts shook the city. The helicopters quickly disappeared. Sirens wailed. Hundreds of people raced to a four-story apartment building, down the street from the compound of the Palestinian Authority.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | December 28, 2007
No one puts more burdens on movie artists than Americans do. We coerce them into an increasingly pressurized system that rewards only commercial success - and determines that success on a film's box-office take in a single weekend. Critics urge them to be topical, yet not at the expense of art, and want directors to be "experimental," even if that limits popular support. The Holy Grail for American moviemakers - producing a movie that unites every portion of the audience, such as The Godfather or The Right Stuff - seems to recede into the mist as viewership grows more fragmented and "niche-oriented" with every passing season.
NEWS
By Laura LeCornu and Laura LeCornu,Contributing Writer | March 2, 1992
BAKU, Azerbaijan -- Armenian guerrillas attacked Azerbaijani settlements in Nagorno-Karabakh yesterday, with no signs of an end to the bloodletting after the reported slaughter of about 1,000 Azerbaijanis in the town of Hodjali on Wednesday.For the first time since Hodjali was captured, Azerbaijan television had a broadcast from Agdam, on the border of the enclave, showing truckloads of corpses and hundreds of refugees and wounded in scenes that are likely to spark violent public reaction in the capital.
NEWS
By Michael Wines XTC and Michael Wines XTC,New York Times News Service | October 10, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Newly uncovered evidence in the terrorist bombing of a Pan American jumbo jet in December 1988 indicates for the first time that Libyan intelligence agents may have assembled and planted the bomb that destroyed the plane, U.S. government investigators involved in the inquiry said this week.Until now the 2-year-old inquiry into the bombing over Lockerbie, Scotland, has focused on evidence that Iran hired a Syrian-sponsored terrorist group, the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine-General Command, to bomb a U.S. airliner in late 1988.
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