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By DAVID AWBREY | March 5, 1993
Wichita, Kansas. -- Maya Angelou has fallen from grace among some of her fellow poets and members of the academic literati. She has committed the ultimate sin. She has become popular with the American masses.Ms. Angelou, who gained nationwide acclaim for reading one of her poems during the Clinton inaugural, recently appeared at the University of South Florida in Tampa to present some of her work. A huge audience waited for her, so large that more than 1,000 people were turned away from the university auditorium.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
John "Jack" M.E. Hasslinger Jr., an accountant who managed a well-known family seafood business, died of heart disease Tuesday at his Mount Airy home. He was 63. Born in Baltimore and raised on Jody Way in Timonium, he was the son of John M.E. Hasslinger Sr., a piano tuner and instructor, and the former Ellen Regina Cosgrove, a homemaker. He was a 1969 graduate of Loyola High School at Blakefield and earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in business administration at Loyola University Maryland.
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FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen,Solis-Cohen Enterprises | May 3, 1992
A new book, "English Earthenware Figures, 1740-1840" by Pat Halfpenny (Antique Collectors' Club, $79.50), shatters popular myths about Staffordshire figures and already is changing the way antiques dealers, collectors and curators on both sides of the Atlantic look at, describe, date and attribute the popular mantelpiece and table-top decorations.These glazed earthenware figures (often less than 8 inches high), generally in the forms of animals, sportsmen, musicians, circus menageries, and biblical, mythological, historical and pastoral scenes, have not gone out of style or production since the early 18th century, when they first were made in the Staffordshire region in central England.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
Jill and Allan Bennett have filled a 22,000-square foot building with a dark and creepy mix of bloody monsters and pitch-black mazes. But soon their popular haunted house, Bennett's Curse, will be homeless, as the property they lease in Jessup is slated for development. The grassy field where their white building holds giant vampire bats, menacing monsters and creepy grim reapers will eventually become part of a mixed-use development of townhouses, shops and offices. So even as they open this weekend for their fall season, the Bennetts are scouting for a new location to set up their fright show for next year.
BUSINESS
August 30, 1998
If you see a Ryder van on the road, it may be a good bet that it's heading to the Dallas-Fort Worth area. And it may be a good bet that it's coming from New York.That's according to a 1997 moving study by Ryder TRS, the nation's second largest truck rental company.Ryder determined where Americans are moving by using "net moves." Net moves are the total number of one-way moves out of an area, using Ryder trucks, subtracted from the total number of one-way moves into that area.The areas were determined using the A. C. Nielsen Company's 211 Designated Market Areas.
NEWS
December 29, 1995
REMEMBER THOSE leaf bags with the pumpkin faces that were a huge hit a few Octobers back? You could hardly pass a residential block and not see one decorating a lawn. Yet last year, they were hardly anywhere to be seen -- seemingly another holiday trend that landed like a comet and fizzled out as quick as it came.With that in mind, one wonders about the popular light show that Howard County General Hospital held for the second straight December in Columbia's Symphony Woods park. After a smashing inaugural run that earned $100,000, this year's show hasn't fared as well.
FEATURES
By Carol Polsky and Carol Polsky,Newsday | January 12, 2008
MELVILLE, N.Y. -- A gold star in the window might mean a son's death in a war. A star on the American flag signifies a state. And a star stuck on a student's work celebrates a job well done. So what is the meaning of those five-point metal stars that hang on house exteriors, sometimes above the garage or up near the gable? Turns out that homeowners just like them, plain and simple. Take Theresa and Richard Gallo of Huntington, N.Y., who last year put a maroon star over their garage after seeing stars on homes in Massachusetts while visiting a cousin there.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun reporter | March 23, 2008
BETHLEHEM, Pa. -- Campaigning for his wife ahead of next month's primary in this state, Bill Clinton was hardly subtle. "I want you to run up her vote here in Pennsylvania," he told hundreds of supporters last week at the Hotel Bethlehem, some of whom waited hours in the rain to see him. Barack Obama leads in the delegate count, and his campaign continues to emphasize piling up delegates, but Hillary Clinton is attempting to create a new battleground in...
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 2, 2003
The Arundel Vocal Arts Society will celebrate its 20th season of making music with Glenette Schumacher and her 60 singers offering two concerts next month. One classical and the other featuring popular music, both concerts will illustrate the versatility of the singers and the programming skills of their music director. The Nov. 2 concert at St. Martin's Lutheran Church in Annapolis will offer such choral music as John Rutter's Requiem and Magnificat by Giacomo Puccini, grandfather of the opera genius.
NEWS
By Foon Rhee and Foon Rhee,Knight Ridder/Tribune | September 30, 1999
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- The South might summon up an image of friendly front porches and "welcome y'all" openness.But Southerners don't take kindly to phone calls disturbing them at home.More so than other Americans, Carolinians and other Southerners have Caller ID so they know who's calling before picking up, a new study says.And now BellSouth is offering a way to check calls without moving a muscle -- the caller's number pops right up on the TV screen. "The ultimate couch potato's telephone gift," spokeswoman Hope Lanier said.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
A winter forecast map that is going viral and suggests above-normal snowfall for most of the country -- and "well above-normal" snow for the mid-Atlantic and New England -- comes from a satire website. The story has been shared widely across social media, carrying the headline "Meteorologists Predict Record-Shattering Snowfall Coming Soon. " The accompanying map forecasts an unusually snowy winter for about two-thirds of the country, and a corridor of even heavier snow from Virginia to Maine.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2014
Victoria F. "Vickie" Gelfman, a prosecutor in the Howard County state's attorney's office whose blog posts about her struggle with acute myeloid leukemia served as an inspiration to others, died Friday of the disease at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Ellicott City resident was 31. "Vickie was such a shining star. She was very gifted, talented and had a warm spirit," said Howard County District Judge Pamila J. Brown. "She had a wonderful spirit and a pleasant demeanor. And as a prosecutor, she represented the state so well.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
Devin Cook's community college lacrosse coach said that the 20-year-old, a business major who was active in lacrosse leagues around the city, wanted to use sports as a way of getting a scholarship and completing college. He had recently earned enough - he worked two jobs - to buy a car and was taking his fellow lacrosse players at the Community College of Baltimore County home after a game last Thursday night. They were stopped in the car on Wilern Avenue in Park Heights when a gunman killed Mr. Cook and wounded his passenger, a fellow lacrosse player.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens and For The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
It's a Wednesday evening at the Pop Physique studio in downtown Baltimore, and a dozen women -- most clad in leggings, T-shirts and socks -- are rotating their hips while trying to hold an exercise ball between their thighs.   "Great job, guys!" says instructor Smithy Onattu, directing her students via a headset as a playlist with songs such as Lana Del Rey's "Florida Kilos" and "Tumblr Girls" by rapper G-Eazy pumps through the art-filled space. Over the course of an hour, the group will tackle a series of exercises: planks and push-ups, plies and other ballet moves.
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
The Maryland Department of Natural Resources has imposed new rules and regulations on water jet pack businesses in Ocean City to keep thrill-seekers safe. The jet packs - which propel pressurized streams of water to lift riders up to 30 feet above the water's surface - left Ocean City police officers "unsure of how to handle them and what to do" after they were introduced last summer, said Julie Brown, a boating education coordinator with the Maryland Natural Resources Police.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 8, 2014
I realize it's impolite to stand up in the 21st century and declare something that was established in Colonial Maryland - say, the election of sheriffs in every county and Baltimore City - to be archaic, inefficient and unnecessary. But with all due respect to the old snuff-sniffers in powdered wigs who mandated it, I can no longer remain seated. Voting for sheriffs is as silly as silk pants. So is voting for registers of wills. Ditto for orphans' court judges, clerks of the court, and even state's attorneys.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | August 3, 2009
Omar S. Jennings Jr., who owned a popular Catonsville bar and restaurant known for its traditional Baltimore menu, died of lung disease Tuesday at St. Elizabeth's Rehabilitation and Nursing Center. He was 79. Born in Baltimore and raised on Holmehurst Avenue, he attended McDonogh, Mount St. Joseph's and Catonsville high schools. Family members said Mr. Jennings' father had operated the old Pimlico Hotel on Park Heights Avenue and bought a Catonsville men's bar, Shooky's Tavern, in 1958 and changed its name to Jennings Cafe.
NEWS
By Noam N. Levey and Noam N. Levey,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 2, 2007
WASHINGTON -- When Democrats take power on Capitol Hill this week, House leaders will kick off their legislative campaign with a lightning-fast, 100-hour agenda. But there won't be a revolution. In marked contrast to the Republicans who swept into the majority in 1994, incoming House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and her legislative allies are not planning to amend the Constitution or eradicate federal agencies. Instead, their initial legislative foray will focus on modest, politically popular issues, including initiatives to expand stem cell research, lower prescription drug prices and tighten congressional ethics rules.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
Sixth in a series of profiles of candidates for governor. Not long into her campaign for governor, Democrat Heather R. Mizeur coined a response to the question still dogging her today: Can she win? To the pundits and the radio hosts, to donors and supporters across the state, to everyone who says she's an intriguing choice but seems a long shot, Mizeur gives the same optimistic answer: "This campaign is about breaking the illusion of impossibility. " The improbable, if not impossible, would be an astronomical ascent in Maryland politics from the House of Delegates to the governor's mansion as the state's first female governor and the first openly gay person to be elected governor in the country.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
ELMONT, N.Y. - For months now, California Chrome has carried the outlandish dreams of his little-guy owners and his unsung trainer every time he's roared around another racetrack. As his victories have mounted, so has his cargo. When he enters the starting gate for Saturday's Belmont Stakes, the dashing chestnut colt will carry the dreams of every thoroughbred racing enthusiast yearning to see the first Triple Crown winner since 1978. It would be great for the sport, they say. And it's hard to argue against the value of a transcendent hero to offset years of drug scandals, declining crowds and fractured governance.
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