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ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | April 25, 2002
She travels by umbrella, is fond of exceptionally long words and knows that a spoonful of sugar makes the medicine go down. She's Mary Poppins, magical nanny extraordinaire. And this weekend and next weekend, you can catch Pumpkin Theatre's presentation of the musical comedy Mary Poppins at the Hannah More Arts Center in Stevenson. Baltimore playwright David Rawlings Brown adapted the classic P.L. Travers Mary Poppins stories for this musical presentation. Nancy Parrish Asendorf stars as the title character.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2010
Impervious to cynicism and layered with critic-retardants, "Mary Poppins" has plopped into the Kennedy Center Opera House for a nice long stay that should keep the box office humming. The musical, a Disney/Cameron Mackintosh presentation that boasts the theatrical bells and whistles expected from those forces, might not fully satisfy folks devoted to, and expecting a copy of, the popular 1964 movie that inspired it. Devotees of the children's book series by P.L. Travers that started it all might find a nit or two to pick as well.
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NEWS
By NATALIE HARVEY | March 8, 1994
"Mary Poppins On Ice" is the Columbia Figure Skating Club's 20th Spring Ice Extravaganza, and performances are scheduled March 26 at 3:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.; and March 27 at 1 p.m. and 4:30 p.m.The club's performances sell out early so stop at the Columbia Ice Rink, at the Oakland Mills Shopping Center, as soon as possible. The price is right at $8 for adults and $6 for children.Information: (410) 730-0322 or (410) 730-3760.*Results are in for the first phase of the "Perfect Attendance" competition at Stevens Forest Elementary School.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2010
Actor Gavin Lee might be the first actor ever to tap-dance upside-down across the ceiling in real time. Lee is the likable, gravity-defying performer who for the past six years has performed as Bert the chimney sweep in Cameron Mackintosh's blockbuster stage version of " Mary Poppins." The national touring production of "Poppins" has just blown into the Kennedy Center (presumably on the east wind), where it will remain through Aug. 22. Lee originated the role in London in 2004, stayed with the character when the show transferred to Broadway, and now is portraying the Cockney charmer during the tour.
NEWS
By Patrick Hickerson and Patrick Hickerson,Contributing Writer | March 25, 1994
For those who love to watch ice skating -- but hate the stress of competitions -- the Columbia Figure Skating Club has entertainment without the judges."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 6, 2005
With a schedule that runs the gamut from Dorothy Hamill and Mary Poppins to John Waters and a soap opera set inside a porn theater, this year's Maryland Film Festival, set for May 5-8, promises a weekend of cinematic extremes. "I think we have always shown movies which are compelling and difficult, but also engaging," says festival head Jed Dietz, noting that films require at least one champion on the MFF advisory board. "We don't program anything that people sort-of feel good about. It's always about passion.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | December 9, 1990
Meet Bart Stephen.He's a 23-year-old Baltimore mortgage company employee who wants to go back to school to earn a degree in occupational therapy.In the meantime, he wants to be a nanny.That's right, he says: a nanny. "I enjoy children. I've worked at the YMCA for the past couple of summers, and since I'm going back to school, it would fit into my schedule. And being a nanny would suit my temperament."Besides, his 22-year-old brother, Matt Stephen, is a live-in nanny for a family of five in northern Howard County -- and is enjoying it immensely.
NEWS
By Tim Weinfeld and Tim Weinfeld,Contributing theater critic | October 10, 1990
"Stage mother" is a term that has become negative and pejorative as a result of the popularity of the stage and film versions of the musical comedy "Gypsy."In this story, Mama Rose guides the show biz careers of her daughters, Louise and Baby June, in a fashion not unlike a marine drill sergeant. The sisters have no desire to follow the orders, but Rose's tactics and tone leave them no choice. The rest of this story is history."Stage mother" is also the term deplored by Finksburg's Joan Eichhorn, the mother of two sisters intent on becoming members of the theatrical profession.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | February 11, 2002
Mary Poppins and her spoonful of sugar never met Mitt Romney and his free pin. Olympic organizers couldn't get enough buses to haul 20,000 spectators from roadside parking to the site of ski jumping and luge. That mile-long stretch of road has a grade of 10 percent, with an Olympic difficulty factor: an altitude of more than 7,100 feet. By offering a commemorative "Gold Medal Mile" pin, officials enticed thousands to pound the pavement. A low-power radio station run by Utah Olympic Park - KUOP - took requests from walkers with cell phones.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stories by Mary Carole McCauley and Stories by Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | May 1, 2005
Getting into the Picture If you could meld the three classic films that will be showcased at this year's Maryland Film Festival, a proper British nanny would fly away from her tearful charges while holding an umbrella and riding a stolen bicycle. After being caught, she would be brought to trial and defended by Atticus Finch. This demonstrates how varied are the films -- and the celebrities who chose them -- that will be featured beginning Friday at the seventh annual Maryland Film Festival: Comic book artist Harvey Pekar will discuss The Bicycle Thief ; Sen. Barbara Mikulski will hold forth about To Kill A Mockingbird and figure skater Dorothy Hamill will introduce Mary Poppins Sing-along.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 11, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The 110th Congress opened with the passage of sweeping new rules intended to curb the influence of lobbyists by prohibiting them from treating lawmakers to meals, trips, stadium box seats or the discounted use of private jets. But it didn't take long for lawmakers to find ways to keep having fun while lobbyists pick up the tab. In the past two months, some lawmakers have disclosed that they've invited lobbyists to help pay for a catalog of outings: lavish birthday parties in a lawmaker's honor ($1,000 a lobbyist)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stories by Mary Carole McCauley and Stories by Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | May 1, 2005
Getting into the Picture If you could meld the three classic films that will be showcased at this year's Maryland Film Festival, a proper British nanny would fly away from her tearful charges while holding an umbrella and riding a stolen bicycle. After being caught, she would be brought to trial and defended by Atticus Finch. This demonstrates how varied are the films -- and the celebrities who chose them -- that will be featured beginning Friday at the seventh annual Maryland Film Festival: Comic book artist Harvey Pekar will discuss The Bicycle Thief ; Sen. Barbara Mikulski will hold forth about To Kill A Mockingbird and figure skater Dorothy Hamill will introduce Mary Poppins Sing-along.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 6, 2005
With a schedule that runs the gamut from Dorothy Hamill and Mary Poppins to John Waters and a soap opera set inside a porn theater, this year's Maryland Film Festival, set for May 5-8, promises a weekend of cinematic extremes. "I think we have always shown movies which are compelling and difficult, but also engaging," says festival head Jed Dietz, noting that films require at least one champion on the MFF advisory board. "We don't program anything that people sort-of feel good about. It's always about passion.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 6, 2005
In London over the holidays, I took in three musicals that reinforced one of the most magical tenets of theater - that the stage is, above all, a place of imagination. All three musicals happen to have forebears in the cinema. Two - Chitty Chitty Bang Bang and Mary Poppins - started out as movies aimed at children (both, coincidentally, also have scores by brothers Richard M. and Robert B. Sherman). Interestingly, however, it was the darkest and most adult of the three shows - a revival of Grand Hotel, a musical about desperation in 1928 Berlin - in which the imagination truly took flight.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Terry Lawson and Terry Lawson,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | December 23, 2004
We've come to it now - the great battle of our time," said a member of the fellowship in The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King. The new "Platinum Series Special Edition" four-disc DVD (New Line) renders the battle even greater, adding 50 additional minutes to the movie, which originally ran 3 hours and 21 minutes. It turns what was already an epic, exhaustive finale to the best movie trilogy ever into a stately, spectacular summation. There are extended sequences, additional explorations of characters and motivations, and restored scenes that were sacrificed (including the last stand of Christopher Lee's Saruman and a romantic interlude between Miranda Otto's Eowyn and David Wenham's Faramir)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | August 17, 2003
Why didn't someone in Hollywood think of this sooner? New Line's Freddy vs. Jason opened in theaters Friday, and the genius at work here is so evident, the amazing thing is no one ever considered it before. Take characters from two successful movies, put them together in one guaranteed awe-inspiring film, then sit back and watch the box-office grosses grow and grow. Freddy, that dream-monger from all those Nightmare on Elm Street movies, and creepmeister Jason from Friday the 13th parts 1 through 1,000, together again for the first time.
NEWS
April 25, 1996
P. L. Travers,96, the woman who created the much-loved fictional character Mary Poppins, died at her London home Tuesday, friends said yesterday."Mary Poppins," published in 1934, was was the first of four books about the extraordinary nanny who arrived with the wind to look after two children in Edwardian London.The story received fresh attention in 1964 when Walt Disney turned it into a movie, starring Julie Andrews. But Ms. Travers, a fiercely private woman with an abiding interest in mythology, disliked the end product, saying it was too simplistic and toned down the darker side of the nanny's character.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter | May 13, 1996
"Hard-Boiled" was John Woo's last Hong Kong film before he decided to go American (as in the hit "Broken Arrow"), and he evidently decided to go out with a bang. Or several million bangs.The movie, surely one of the most intense visions ever hTC committed to film, shows tonight at 7: 15 at the Charles as part of that theater's neat series of Hong Kong cinema. In this one, Woo's great star Chow Yun-Fat plays a cop named Tequila in a hunt for gunrunners.I can think of no other movie with this kind of crazy off-the-wall outlaw violence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | April 25, 2002
She travels by umbrella, is fond of exceptionally long words and knows that a spoonful of sugar makes the medicine go down. She's Mary Poppins, magical nanny extraordinaire. And this weekend and next weekend, you can catch Pumpkin Theatre's presentation of the musical comedy Mary Poppins at the Hannah More Arts Center in Stevenson. Baltimore playwright David Rawlings Brown adapted the classic P.L. Travers Mary Poppins stories for this musical presentation. Nancy Parrish Asendorf stars as the title character.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | February 11, 2002
Mary Poppins and her spoonful of sugar never met Mitt Romney and his free pin. Olympic organizers couldn't get enough buses to haul 20,000 spectators from roadside parking to the site of ski jumping and luge. That mile-long stretch of road has a grade of 10 percent, with an Olympic difficulty factor: an altitude of more than 7,100 feet. By offering a commemorative "Gold Medal Mile" pin, officials enticed thousands to pound the pavement. A low-power radio station run by Utah Olympic Park - KUOP - took requests from walkers with cell phones.
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