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NEWS
March 25, 1997
Samm Sinclair Baker,87, who wrote more than 30 books on self-improvement, including "The Complete Scarsdale Medical Diet" with Dr. Herman Tarnower, died March 5 after suffering a stroke in Port Chester, N.Y.James W. Coe,75, a film and television still photographer whose works include "Police Academy 5," "Jaws 2" and "Roots," died March 12 in Clinton Township, Mich., of complications from Parkinson's disease.Bishop Timothy J. Harrington,78, who headed the Roman Catholic Diocese of Worcester, Mass.
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NEWS
By Stephen Stahley | March 12, 2014
1969 was a year I well remember - it was my first year in a seminary in Virginia. I was beginning my journey to the priesthood with an American religious order, the Missionary Servants of the Most Holy Trinity. Nine years later, I was ordained a priest in Silver Spring, Md. That same year, a Catholic seminarian in Argentina was ordained a Jesuit Priest. His name: Jorge Mario Bergoglio. While it seems impossible, forty-five years have passed. Father Bergoglio is now Pope Francis, and approaching his one year anniversary in the post, and I am a husband, a father and a professional in the field of mental health.
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NEWS
June 19, 1998
Cardinal John Joseph Carberry, 93, retired archbishop of St. Louis, died there Wednesday.He was ordained a priest of the Diocese of Brooklyn, N.Y., in 1929. In 1956, he was named bishop of Lafayette, Ind., by Pope Pius XII, and in 1965 was appointed Bishop of Columbus, Ohio, by Pope Paul VI. In 1968, the pope appointed him bishop and archbishop of St. Louis. He was named to the College of Cardinals a year later.Pub Date: 6/19/98
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2013
As 11 American Roman Catholic cardinals join with their colleagues in Rome to elect the successor to Pope Benedict XVI, it is interesting to note that three cardinals who visited Baltimore during the last century were eventually elected pope. The first to visit Baltimore was Cardinal Eugenio Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Pacelli, who was then Papal secretary of state. The future Pope Pius XII paid what The Baltimore Sun called a "fleeting visit" on Oct. 21, 1936. "The occasion marked the first time a Papal Secretary of State ever has visited the Archdiocese of Baltimore, the Prime See of the United States," reported the newspaper.
FEATURES
June 19, 1996
Today in history: June 19In 1862, slavery was outlawed in U.S. territories.In 1910, Father's Day was celebrated for the first time, in Spokane, Wash.In 1961, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a provision in Maryland's constitution requiring state officeholders to profess a belief in God.In 1977, Pope Paul VI proclaimed a 19th-century bishop, John Neumann, the first male U.S. saint.Ten years ago: University of Maryland basketball star Len Bias suffered a fatal cocaine-induced seizure.Pub Date: 6/19/96
NEWS
January 5, 1994
The agreement between Israel and the Vatican to establish diplomatic relations this year must be seen in many dimensions. In all, it is a positive step, an improvement in the ability of different peoples to gain the riches of human values from human contact.At one level, this is a step in reconciliation of Christians and Jews and of the Catholic Church and Judaism. The Vatican refused to recognize Israel on its independence in 1949. The reason varied, being first a requisite for the internationalization of Jerusalem, and later for Palestinian independence.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2000
Charles Edward Brown, a retired Baltimore public school educator who was prominent in Catholic church circles, died Saturday at Mercy Medical Center from complications of an infection. He was 86. The longtime Park Heights Avenue resident became an inspirational educator who received a papal knighthood from Pope Paul VI in recognition of his church work. A physically imposing man, Mr. Brown was a soft-spoken yet strong presence, friends and relatives said. "He was a man of the highest integrity who was always clear, firm and fair," said Charles G. Tildon Jr., former president of the Community College of Baltimore and a longtime friend.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | July 25, 1993
Today marks the twenty-fifth anniversary of Humanae Vitae (OfHuman Life), the encyclical issued by Pope Paul VI reiterating the Roman Catholic Church's ban on artificial means of birth control. There won't be many sermons commemorating the occasion, and even an ardent admirer of the document notes that in 25 years she has never heard the words "Humanae Vitae" uttered from a pulpit in a Catholic church.Not unlike Roe vs. Wade, the 1973 Supreme Court decision that was supposed to end the abortion controversy in the United States, Humanae Vitae fell far short of providing the last word for Catholics on the subject of birth control.
NEWS
By Rev. Joseph Gallagher | October 1, 1995
The pope, who is due to visit Baltimore next Sunday, is a titanic figure of our time, a troubled time which is ravenously hungry for heroes.Even a decade ago, in his "Oxford Dictionary of the Popes," the Anglican priest-historian J. N .D. Kelly could write of him: "Few popes have had such wide-ranging intellectual equipment, and none has had such a far-ranging impact."In addition to his astonishing intellectual gifts, he has shown incredible energy, iron-clad determination, courage and magnanimity (when not dealing with troublesome theologians)
NEWS
By Stephen Stahley | March 12, 2014
1969 was a year I well remember - it was my first year in a seminary in Virginia. I was beginning my journey to the priesthood with an American religious order, the Missionary Servants of the Most Holy Trinity. Nine years later, I was ordained a priest in Silver Spring, Md. That same year, a Catholic seminarian in Argentina was ordained a Jesuit Priest. His name: Jorge Mario Bergoglio. While it seems impossible, forty-five years have passed. Father Bergoglio is now Pope Francis, and approaching his one year anniversary in the post, and I am a husband, a father and a professional in the field of mental health.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2000
Charles Edward Brown, a retired Baltimore public school educator who was prominent in Catholic church circles, died Saturday at Mercy Medical Center from complications of an infection. He was 86. The longtime Park Heights Avenue resident became an inspirational educator who received a papal knighthood from Pope Paul VI in recognition of his church work. A physically imposing man, Mr. Brown was a soft-spoken yet strong presence, friends and relatives said. "He was a man of the highest integrity who was always clear, firm and fair," said Charles G. Tildon Jr., former president of the Community College of Baltimore and a longtime friend.
NEWS
June 19, 1998
Cardinal John Joseph Carberry, 93, retired archbishop of St. Louis, died there Wednesday.He was ordained a priest of the Diocese of Brooklyn, N.Y., in 1929. In 1956, he was named bishop of Lafayette, Ind., by Pope Pius XII, and in 1965 was appointed Bishop of Columbus, Ohio, by Pope Paul VI. In 1968, the pope appointed him bishop and archbishop of St. Louis. He was named to the College of Cardinals a year later.Pub Date: 6/19/98
NEWS
March 25, 1997
Samm Sinclair Baker,87, who wrote more than 30 books on self-improvement, including "The Complete Scarsdale Medical Diet" with Dr. Herman Tarnower, died March 5 after suffering a stroke in Port Chester, N.Y.James W. Coe,75, a film and television still photographer whose works include "Police Academy 5," "Jaws 2" and "Roots," died March 12 in Clinton Township, Mich., of complications from Parkinson's disease.Bishop Timothy J. Harrington,78, who headed the Roman Catholic Diocese of Worcester, Mass.
FEATURES
June 19, 1996
Today in history: June 19In 1862, slavery was outlawed in U.S. territories.In 1910, Father's Day was celebrated for the first time, in Spokane, Wash.In 1961, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a provision in Maryland's constitution requiring state officeholders to profess a belief in God.In 1977, Pope Paul VI proclaimed a 19th-century bishop, John Neumann, the first male U.S. saint.Ten years ago: University of Maryland basketball star Len Bias suffered a fatal cocaine-induced seizure.Pub Date: 6/19/96
NEWS
By Rev. Joseph Gallagher | October 1, 1995
The pope, who is due to visit Baltimore next Sunday, is a titanic figure of our time, a troubled time which is ravenously hungry for heroes.Even a decade ago, in his "Oxford Dictionary of the Popes," the Anglican priest-historian J. N .D. Kelly could write of him: "Few popes have had such wide-ranging intellectual equipment, and none has had such a far-ranging impact."In addition to his astonishing intellectual gifts, he has shown incredible energy, iron-clad determination, courage and magnanimity (when not dealing with troublesome theologians)
NEWS
January 5, 1994
The agreement between Israel and the Vatican to establish diplomatic relations this year must be seen in many dimensions. In all, it is a positive step, an improvement in the ability of different peoples to gain the riches of human values from human contact.At one level, this is a step in reconciliation of Christians and Jews and of the Catholic Church and Judaism. The Vatican refused to recognize Israel on its independence in 1949. The reason varied, being first a requisite for the internationalization of Jerusalem, and later for Palestinian independence.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2013
As 11 American Roman Catholic cardinals join with their colleagues in Rome to elect the successor to Pope Benedict XVI, it is interesting to note that three cardinals who visited Baltimore during the last century were eventually elected pope. The first to visit Baltimore was Cardinal Eugenio Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Pacelli, who was then Papal secretary of state. The future Pope Pius XII paid what The Baltimore Sun called a "fleeting visit" on Oct. 21, 1936. "The occasion marked the first time a Papal Secretary of State ever has visited the Archdiocese of Baltimore, the Prime See of the United States," reported the newspaper.
FEATURES
August 12, 1999
Today in history: Aug. 12In 1898, the peace protocol ending the Spanish-American War was signed. Hawaii was formally annexed to the United States.In 1944, Joseph P. Kennedy Jr., eldest son of Joseph and Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy, was killed with his co-pilot when their explosives-laden Navy plane blew up over England.In 1953, the Soviet Union conducted a secret test of its first hydrogen bomb.In 1960, the first balloon satellite-the Echo One-was launched by the United States from Cape Canaveral, Fla.In 1972, the last American combat ground troops left Vietnam.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | July 25, 1993
Today marks the twenty-fifth anniversary of Humanae Vitae (OfHuman Life), the encyclical issued by Pope Paul VI reiterating the Roman Catholic Church's ban on artificial means of birth control. There won't be many sermons commemorating the occasion, and even an ardent admirer of the document notes that in 25 years she has never heard the words "Humanae Vitae" uttered from a pulpit in a Catholic church.Not unlike Roe vs. Wade, the 1973 Supreme Court decision that was supposed to end the abortion controversy in the United States, Humanae Vitae fell far short of providing the last word for Catholics on the subject of birth control.
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