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Pope John Paul

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By Dan Fesperman and John Rivera : Sun Staff | April 3, 2005
Pope John Paul II, who died yesterday at the age of 84, was a proud son of Poland who helped break communism's hold on Eastern Europe as he kept a strict doctrinal grip on worldwide Roman Catholicism. As the first non-Italian pope since 1523, the man born as Karol Josef Wojtyla sought out crowds and cameras during his 26-year reign as no previous pontiff had. A one-time actor, he became a performer to the world, taking his spiritual message of hope, tolerance and economic justice to more than 130 countries.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
George Frank Thompson, who made and served lunch to Pope John Paul II on his visit to Baltimore and who had earlier mixed drinks for five presidents as a Capitol Hill barman, died Dec. 14 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 98 and lived in the Otterbein section of the Inner Harbor. Family members said that he was hurt in a fall on a transit bus two months ago and died of complications from that injury. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Edward and Emma Milburn Thompson.
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NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 3, 2005
VATICAN CITY - Pope John Paul II died yesterday, more than a quarter-century after beginning a reign that transformed the papacy. He succumbed to years of health problems that ravaged his body but did little to diminish his control of the Roman Catholic Church or his political influence across the globe. The pope, 84, died during the third day of a worldwide vigil marked most poignantly by huge crowds that gathered outside his apartment above St. Peter's Square, from where he had led them in prayer for so many years.
NEWS
December 17, 2013
Nelson Mandela was one of those rare individuals who not only changed the course of history for his country and for his people but for the world. It is a better place because of him ( "Mandela showed powerfully how one person can improve the world," Dec. 10). Throughout history the world has known many great individuals. In my lifetime such men as Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King and Pope John Paul have changed history for the better. All of them exhibited a very human view of mankind that went beyond their own causes and purposes.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2005
He was in town just a bit longer than the average workday. But in the eyes of Baltimore's Roman Catholics, Pope John Paul II was here long enough on Oct. 8, 1995, to write a key chapter in the history of the city that is the birthplace of American Catholicism. Pope John Paul had been scheduled to visit Baltimore in 1994, but he broke his hip in April of that year and later had surgery that forced him to postpone the trip. The pastoral visit, which was to be his second to the United States as pope and the first by a pope to Maryland, was rescheduled and Baltimore was included on an itinerary after stops in New York and Newark, N.J. After landing midmorning at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, the pope celebrated Mass at Oriole Park at Camden Yards, rode through the downtown streets and ate lunch with the poor and afflicted at Our Daily Bread, a Mount Vernon soup kitchen.
TOPIC
By Larry Williams and Larry Williams,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | May 15, 2005
In his more than 26 years as pope, John Paul II made saints out of 484 men and women, more than all his predecessors combined. Along the way, he created 1,338 blesseds - individuals who were deemed responsible for at least one miracle. Now, Pope Benedict XVI says he has decided to put his predecessor on the fast track toward becoming a saint himself, bypassing church rules that would have required a five-year wait before beginning the complicated process that leads to a formal declaration of sainthood in the Roman Catholic Church.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | October 24, 2008
Calling for a "sanctuary in a suffering city," Archbishop Edwin F. O'Brien dedicated the Pope John Paul II Prayer Garden in downtown Baltimore yesterday before unveiling a bronze statue of the late pontiff. Speaking at Charles and Franklin streets, the archbishop said he hoped the new green space - the site of the demolished 100-year-old Rochambeau apartments - would become a symbol of the rebirth of "many, many more Baltimore street corners." He described Baltimore as a city "where too many street corners are just places where drug deals take place and where gunfire inevitably follows."
NEWS
April 3, 2005
Of all the 20th century popes, none was more effective at wielding the power of his office than Pope John Paul II. By helping to reshape the world as he found it, John Paul II ... had an impact on human affairs that went well beyond the institutional bounds of the church to which he dedicated his life. ... The pope's continuing willingness to be seen publicly as he aged from an energetic, athletic man in his 50s to an elderly figure in his 80s - unable to stand on his own and trembling with Parkinson's disease - was a reminder that he, too, was mortal.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 14, 2005
ROME - Pope John Paul II spoke publicly, although briefly, for the first time in weeks yesterday and then left the hospital where he has been recovering since emergency surgery Feb. 24 raised fears about his health and ability to lead the Roman Catholic Church. As night fell over the city, the pontiff boarded a silver Mercedes minivan, made the sign of the cross and headed home to the Vatican, where aides said he would resume his convalescence. His participation in Easter observations remains uncertain.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Sun Staff Writer | September 15, 1995
Patricia Czarski lifts a Venetian blind and pokes her head out a second-story window of a Highlandtown rowhouse to greet Pope John Paul II in pure Bawlmer-ese. "Believe it or not, hon, the Vatican has something in common with Hollin'-town."Her Linwood Avenue neighbor, Stella Walas, takes the cue, pausing as she goes at her marble steps with a scrub brush. "We hear you have marble steps, too," she says. "And this is the way I do mine." Then Mrs. Czarski, Mrs. Walas and another neighbor, Anna Mister, join in unison: "Welcome to Baltimore, Pope John Paul!"
NEWS
October 12, 2011
Conservative media outlets have criticized the Occupy Wall Street protesters as mob-like, left-wing extremists with no voice and no real agenda - or as the Democrats' answer to the tea party. But the protesters' critique of capitalist society can't be so easily dismissed. Pope John Paul II was a great leader who played an important role in the collapse of communism and the fall of the Berlin wall. But he was also a sharp critic of the shortcomings of capitalist societies that were not balanced with morals and values.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jacques Kelly | March 1, 2010
John Kennedy Gutierrez, a Woodberry-based metals artisan who was part of the design team for the Pope John Paul II Prayer Garden, died of cancer Thursday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Medfield resident was 45. "He had an indomitable spirit and the things he made were magic," said Baltimore developer William Struever. "He was a rock, a pillar of goodwill. His works were gorgeous but always enormously practical." Mr. Gutierrez worked with numerous architects and designers and helped create Woodberry Kitchen, Tapas Teatro, Red Star and Copra restaurants.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | February 26, 2010
John Kennedy Gutierrez, a Woodberry-based metals artisan who was part of the design team for the Pope John Paul II Prayer Garden, died of cancer Thursday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Medfield resident was 45. "He had an indomitable spirit and the things he made were magic," said Baltimore developer William Struever. "He was a rock, a pillar of goodwill. His works were gorgeous but always enormously practical." Mr. Gutierrez worked with numerous architects and designers and helped create the Woodberry Kitchen, Tapas Teatro, Red Star and Copra restaurants.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | October 26, 2008
For religious leaders, it's a spiritual oasis near the heart of the city. For nature lovers, it's a much-needed green space, open to all. For those who value historic architecture, it symbolizes the failure of the preservation process in Baltimore. Even though it covers no more ground than a tennis court, it's hard to think of another public space with the ability to trigger so many conflicting reactions as the Pope John Paul II Prayer Garden that was dedicated last week. The $1.5 million garden was built as a complement to the recently restored Basilica of the Assumption, which occupies the same block in Baltimore's Cathedral Hill district.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | October 24, 2008
Calling for a "sanctuary in a suffering city," Archbishop Edwin F. O'Brien dedicated the Pope John Paul II Prayer Garden in downtown Baltimore yesterday before unveiling a bronze statue of the late pontiff. Speaking at Charles and Franklin streets, the archbishop said he hoped the new green space - the site of the demolished 100-year-old Rochambeau apartments - would become a symbol of the rebirth of "many, many more Baltimore street corners." He described Baltimore as a city "where too many street corners are just places where drug deals take place and where gunfire inevitably follows."
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | April 13, 2008
It may seem an unlikely story, but Joe Sheppard's career as portraitist to popes and cardinals had its genesis in a boxing ring. "Years ago, I used to box every Saturday at Mack Lewis' gym on Broadway," recalls the 77-year-old Maryland artist, who now lives part of each year in Pietrasanta, Italy. "One day, this guy who had been playing basketball comes over and says, `Can I box with you?' So I said OK. I never knew his name or anything." Years later, Sheppard ran into the fellow at a party.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | March 31, 2008
Baltimore native Joseph Sheppard has painted public figures including former President George H.W. Bush and filmmaker John Waters, and his portraits can be found in government buildings, churches and galleries. But his latest work of art will be in the open for all to see: a 7-foot- tall bronze statue of the late Pope John Paul II. Sheppard's statue will be the focal point of the Pope John Paul II Prayer Garden, a $1.5 million monument and contemplative space planned for the southwest corner of Charles and Franklin streets.
NEWS
By Christine Spolar and Christine Spolar,Chicago Tribune | March 25, 2007
ROME -- In life, Pope John Paul II moved crowds like a rock star. Now a cadre of theologians, cardinals and medical doctors from the Vatican will determine if the late pontiff should soar to the level of sainthood. A third-floor office that overlooks St. Peter's Square, which echoed in April 2005 with funeral prayers for the former Karol Wojtyla, is where the decision will be weighed. By April 2, all documents on the spiritual life and times of the Polish pope will be carted into the rarefied sanctum of the Congregation for the Causes of Saints.
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