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Pope Benedict Xvi

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NEWS
April 20, 2005
THE SWIFT election of Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger as the leader of the world's 1.1 billion Catholics reaffirms the church's conservative direction and a fealty to religious doctrine first and foremost. How Benedict XVI, the 265th pope, adapts that commitment to faith to the 21st century problems facing the church will be the 78-year-old pontiff's greatest challenge. Issues such as HIV/AIDS, the rise of Christian evangelicals in Catholic Latin America and the complex advances in biotechnology come to mind.
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NEWS
July 30, 2013
Pope Francis did not this week change church doctrine toward gays and lesbians. He did not condone same-sex marriage. Nor did he suggest he approves of homosexuality. But in one short sentence, the leader of the Catholic Church fundamentally shifted the tone of the conversation about gays and the world's largest Christian denomination. In remarks made to reporters Monday on a return flight from Brazil, the pontiff said he would not judge priests for their sexual orientation. "If someone is gay and he searches for the Lord and has good will, who am I to judge?"
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NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,Los Angeles Times | September 17, 2006
VATICAN CITY -- With furor spreading throughout the Islamic world, Pope Benedict XVI expressed deep regret yesterday that a speech he gave at a German university last week had offended Muslims. In a statement released by his new secretary of state, Pope Benedict reiterated his "respect and esteem for those who profess Islam," adding that he hoped they will be "helped to understand the correct meaning of his words." It did not seem likely that the pope's expression of regret would satisfy the clamors from many corners of the world that he apologize.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2013
Pope Francis surprised the Catholic faithful Monday by saying the Roman Catholic Church shouldn't marginalize gay priests, saying: "Who am I to judge?" The comments followed one of the largest papal Masses in recent history over the weekend, when the pope told an estimated 3 million people on the Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro to spread the Gospel to "the fringes of society. " The newly appointed leader of the Roman Catholic Church then took to his papal airplane, where he told a group of reporters on the long flight back to Rome that gay Catholic priests "should not be marginalized" in the church.
NEWS
By Janice D'Arcy and Janice D'Arcy,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2005
Wearing a hard hat and a white collar, Cardinal William H. Keeler led a tour yesterday of the half-restored Basilica of the Assumption in downtown Baltimore, all the while hinting to contractors that he expects the project to be finished early. "I've told people in Rome that the weather is nicer in Baltimore in October than it is in Rome," he said, referring to the invitation he has sent Pope Benedict XVI to attend the basilica's rededication -- a ceremony scheduled for November next year.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2005
When the Rev. Denis J. Sweeney heard the news, he tore down the halls of St. Mary's Catholic school in Annapolis, high-fiving students and encouraging them to shout, "Three cheers for the new pope." But 30 miles away, at the Hyattsville headquarters of the pro-reform Catholics Speak Out, where the faithful were hoping for a sign of liberalization on issues such as birth control and the ordination of women, the reaction was less celebratory. "It really saddens me," said Rea Howarth, the director of Catholics Speak Out. "It's an indication that they're intent on holding the hard line, and the church really is in trouble."
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2005
The bells rang for 45 minutes at St. Alphonsus Church after the election of a new pope yesterday. A deacon had interrupted the midday mass to whisper into the ear of a priest that a successor to Pope John Paul II had been selected - a prominent conservative cardinal. The news was met with support at Baltimore's bastion of traditional Catholicism. "It's not going to change things here," Monsignor Arthur W. Bastress said later at the 205-year-old downtown church, which proudly declares that it is the only one in the city to regularly celebrate the Latin-language Tridentine Mass, described on the church's Web site as "the most beautiful thing this side of Heaven."
NEWS
February 3, 2009
LEON KLENICKI, 78 Rabbi, interfaith dialogue advocate Rabbi Leon Klenicki, an advocate for improving interfaith relations whose efforts were lauded by Pope Benedict XVI, died of cancer Jan. 25 at his Monroe Township, N.J., home, his wife, Myra, said Saturday. Rabbi Klenicki wrote or co-wrote numerous books and papers aimed at improving relations between Jews and Catholics, according to the Anti-Defamation League, the organization Rabbi Klenicki served for more than 30 years. In 2007, he was made a Papal Knight of the Order of St. Gregory the Great by Pope Benedict XVI.
NEWS
November 26, 2006
The pope was speaking in St. Peter's Square after the assassination of Lebanese Christian politician Pierre Gemayel. ?In the face of the dark forces that try to destroy the country, I call on all Lebanese not to be overwhelmed by hatred, but to strengthen national unity, justice and reconciliation.? Pope Benedict XVI
NEWS
By Photos by Amy Davis and Photos by Amy Davis,Sun photographer | April 21, 2008
The more than 45,000 people who attended Thursday's Mass with Pope Benedict XVI in Washington were surrounded by signs for baseball, hot dogs and beer. But for the faithful, that was a minor matter. For them, Nationals Park became an open-air cathedral where they could show their faith with the pontiff.
NEWS
March 14, 2013
Newly elected Pope Francis represents change in many respects. He is the first pope from the New World (and the first from outside of Europe in 1,200 years), the first Jesuit and the first Francis. But for American Catholics, who in poll after poll in recent weeks have expressed disagreement with the church's stances on the ordination of women or the requirement of celibacy for priests, he may seem like more of the same. Pope Francis, the former Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Buenos Aires, is a doctrinaire conservative in those matters, as were Pope Benedict XVI and Pope John Paul II before him. Given the views of the College of Cardinals - all of whom were appointed by John Paul or Benedict - it could hardly have been otherwise.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2013
Roman Catholic cardinals went into a virtual news blackout Tuesday as they began to elect a new pope, but that has only heightened interest in what's happening behind the closed doors of their conclave. "I just had 'smoke cam' on my screen," said Monsignor Stuart Swetland, a professor and vice president for Catholic identity at Mount St. Mary's University in Emmitsburg who was watching CBS News' online "Vatican Smoke Cam" to see what color smoke emerged from the Sistine Chapel in Vatican City.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2013
As 11 American Roman Catholic cardinals join with their colleagues in Rome to elect the successor to Pope Benedict XVI, it is interesting to note that three cardinals who visited Baltimore during the last century were eventually elected pope. The first to visit Baltimore was Cardinal Eugenio Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Pacelli, who was then Papal secretary of state. The future Pope Pius XII paid what The Baltimore Sun called a "fleeting visit" on Oct. 21, 1936. "The occasion marked the first time a Papal Secretary of State ever has visited the Archdiocese of Baltimore, the Prime See of the United States," reported the newspaper.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | February 27, 2013
Pope Benedict XVI retires Thursday, and he leaves the workplace the way many of us would like to - on his own terms. He wasn't laid off at 50 with few transferable skills, required to retrain or reinvent himself and then compete for work with people half his age. His job wasn't outsourced (although the conclave set to choose his successor may elect someone from another country to do his job). He is 85, but he didn't have to keep working because the recession wiped out his meager 401(k)
NEWS
Susan Reimer | February 13, 2013
You have to wonder what kind of fun Vatican mystery writer Dan Brown would have with the startling resignation of Pope Benedict XVI. As would be the case when any well-known CEO suddenly steps down "for health reasons," we are immediately suspicious. Was he, like the last pope to step down voluntarily more than 700 years ago, simply the wrong man for the job? A shy and aging scholar overwhelmed by the demands of guiding the church through the scandals of sex abuse and money laundering, who was happier in the library than on the balcony at St. Peter's?
NEWS
By Michael Harvey | February 12, 2013
When Pope Benedict XVI shockingly announced his impending retirement this week, it was a sign that the contemporary world's relentless reinvention of leadership has reached into even our oldest institutions. The Catholic Church's official list of popes, the Annuario Pontificio, names 265 popes (excluding some Antipopes), stretching back two millennia to St. Peter himself. In all that time, just four have resigned. And Benedict is the first to do so in six centuries. Why him, and why now?
NEWS
April 18, 2008
Thousands jammed Nationals Park in Washington yesterday for the first outdoor Mass celebrated by Pope Benedict XVI during his six-day visit to the United States. Above, Sister Leticia M.C. (left) of the Missionaries of Charity in the Bronx, N.Y., and Sister Maria Christine of the Sisters of the Poor in Catonsville watch the activity before the service. The sports arena was redecorated into a sort of sunny cathedral for the occasion.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
Crystal Sewell knows what she wants to see in the next pope: a combination of the last two. "I'm a conservative soul," the 29-year-old Reservoir Hill woman said Monday after the midday Mass at St. Alphonsus Church in downtown Baltimore. "I feel like John Paul II had this particular zeal for youth and that brought the youth closer to the Church. Benedict took over with instilling older traditions into today's youth, which brings a whole new focus on what it means to be Catholic today.
NEWS
By William E. Lori | August 19, 2012
In October 2012 the Church will observe the 50th Anniversary of the opening of the Second Vatican Council. Like every anniversary, it is a time to look back and to look ahead. There will be many articles and talks on the history of the council and its true meaning. As well there should. Among those who took a leading part in the council was a young bishop named Karol Wojtyla, later known to the world as Pope John Paul II. He called the Second Vatican Council "a unique and unrepeatable experience.
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