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By J. Wynn Rousuck | May 29, 2004
Mamma Mia! is about to wrap up its three-week run at the Hippodrome Theatre, and the clever way in which the musical blends a new story with old pop songs - in this case, by the former Swedish group ABBA - got us thinking. New musicals have already cropped up using the songs of Elvis and Queen, but what about some less likely pop songbook musicals? Here are a few we came up with: Bye Bye Bye Britney, a bittersweet tale of love turned to hate, using the songs of Britney Spears and Justin Timberlake.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sara Toth | December 4, 2012
Well, America, now you've done it. By eliminating Dez Duron last week, you've officially knocked Christina Aguilera out of competition on "The Voice," and I warned you, I WARNED you, that she would become insufferable if she had nothing else to do but sit there. I tried, America. Now, I know this is Christina's own fault, for putting together such a lousy team. But I'm still bitter, because without her own contestants to cheer on, Christina has put her support behind …. Cassadee Pope.
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NEWS
By BOB PROTZMAN | August 13, 1995
St. Paul, Minn. -- There haven't been any A-bomb musical blockbusters over the years, but there have been some pop songs dealing with the dropping of the bomb.Were they serious songs decrying the death and destruction or questioning the morality of the decision to drop it?Uh . . . not quite."They were mostly just tasteless," says St. Paul disc jockey Pete Lee, who has compiled a survey of wide-ranging songs with A-bomb connections."There's a rock 'n' roll sensibility here, a kind of proud ignorance about the bomb in most of these songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 1, 2007
As of six years ago, the sadness surrounding Mark Linkous hadn't dissipated. Known to avant-garde pop fans as the virtual one-man band Sparklehorse, he had survived a near-death experience a few years before. In 1996, an accidental mix of prescribed antidepressants, Valium and booze caused him to pass out in a London hotel room with his legs bent beneath his body for 14 hours. But after months of multiple surgeries and rehabilitation to regain use of his legs, Linkous rebounded and managed to release two well-received albums: 1998's Good Morning Spider and 2001's It's a Wonderful Life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 1, 2007
As of six years ago, the sadness surrounding Mark Linkous hadn't dissipated. Known to avant-garde pop fans as the virtual one-man band Sparklehorse, he had survived a near-death experience a few years before. In 1996, an accidental mix of prescribed antidepressants, Valium and booze caused him to pass out in a London hotel room with his legs bent beneath his body for 14 hours. But after months of multiple surgeries and rehabilitation to regain use of his legs, Linkous rebounded and managed to release two well-received albums: 1998's Good Morning Spider and 2001's It's a Wonderful Life.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 20, 1999
The 50-member Arundel Vocal Arts Society concluded its 15th season Saturday with "Songs for My Uncle Sam -- An American Songbook," a rousing production directed by Glenette Schumacher and accompanied by Cynthia Slate on piano, Helen Schlaich on woodwind, Ginger Turner on trumpet, Peter Hengen on bass and William Watson on percussion.The program was a patriotic melange drawn from musical theater, folk songs, and pop songs of the World War II era. The society presented a Broadway combination, including a song from Johnny Mercer's seldom-heard "Li'l Abner," familiar George M. Cohan tunes of "George M" and most of the songs from the less familiar "1776."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 15, 2004
There was a time, decades ago, when jazz was pop music, when the vocalists and instrumentalists graced the covers of major magazines. But in this bombastic, hip-hopped era, few players are known outside tight circles. To some, the genre, particularly jazz singing, has become a stuffy closet -- elitist and exclusive. The standards are revisited over and over and over again. You rarely hear about the adventurous ones, the artists who take real risks with the music. Which is what jazz is all about: pushing forward, dismantling a song and putting it back together with a fresh perspective, an individual and communal touch.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | May 17, 1993
As Warren Zevon sees it, his job description is fairly simple: "Write 10 pop songs and record 'em."That's what he's been doing, on a more or less steady basis, since 1976. And he's been relatively successful at it, too. He cracked the Top 40 with "Werewolves of London" and "Poor Poor Pitiful Me" (though the latter hit came courtesy of Linda Ronstadt), and churning out a steady stream of sardonic rockers, the best of which bear blood-and-guts titles like "Boom Boom Mancini" or "Lawyers, Guns and Money."
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2004
His work is up for an Academy Award for the 17th time, but today, Gary LeMel seems more interested in Baltimore than in the prospect of winning a second gold statue. "I haven't spent much time here," says the head of worldwide music for Warner Bros. films as he strides through Mount Vernon on a recent windy afternoon. "But I've worked with [director] Barry Levinson many times. I can see why he loves it here. What a sense of history." You might say the same of LeMel, a 57-year-old who is to movie soundtracks what the Washington Monument is to the local scenery - a landmark still in the middle of the action.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sara Toth | December 4, 2012
Well, America, now you've done it. By eliminating Dez Duron last week, you've officially knocked Christina Aguilera out of competition on "The Voice," and I warned you, I WARNED you, that she would become insufferable if she had nothing else to do but sit there. I tried, America. Now, I know this is Christina's own fault, for putting together such a lousy team. But I'm still bitter, because without her own contestants to cheer on, Christina has put her support behind …. Cassadee Pope.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | May 29, 2004
Mamma Mia! is about to wrap up its three-week run at the Hippodrome Theatre, and the clever way in which the musical blends a new story with old pop songs - in this case, by the former Swedish group ABBA - got us thinking. New musicals have already cropped up using the songs of Elvis and Queen, but what about some less likely pop songbook musicals? Here are a few we came up with: Bye Bye Bye Britney, a bittersweet tale of love turned to hate, using the songs of Britney Spears and Justin Timberlake.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 15, 2004
There was a time, decades ago, when jazz was pop music, when the vocalists and instrumentalists graced the covers of major magazines. But in this bombastic, hip-hopped era, few players are known outside tight circles. To some, the genre, particularly jazz singing, has become a stuffy closet -- elitist and exclusive. The standards are revisited over and over and over again. You rarely hear about the adventurous ones, the artists who take real risks with the music. Which is what jazz is all about: pushing forward, dismantling a song and putting it back together with a fresh perspective, an individual and communal touch.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2004
His work is up for an Academy Award for the 17th time, but today, Gary LeMel seems more interested in Baltimore than in the prospect of winning a second gold statue. "I haven't spent much time here," says the head of worldwide music for Warner Bros. films as he strides through Mount Vernon on a recent windy afternoon. "But I've worked with [director] Barry Levinson many times. I can see why he loves it here. What a sense of history." You might say the same of LeMel, a 57-year-old who is to movie soundtracks what the Washington Monument is to the local scenery - a landmark still in the middle of the action.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 3, 2002
MOSCOW - Vladimir V. Putin has been celebrated in books, T-shirts and calendars. His bust sits on the desk of many a bureaucrat. Newspaper and magazine covers frequently feature his somewhat doleful image. One man has even tried to name a new variety of tomato after him. But a new pop song, "I Want Someone Like Putin," appears to mark a milestone in the remarkable career of the former-KGB-spy-turned-Russian-president. He might soon be elevated from statesman to sex symbol. In the tune, which can be heard blasting from cars crawling along Moscow's streets these days, the lead singer in the all-girl group Singing Together complains about her alcohol-guzzling boor of an ex-boyfriend and coos about Putin: "And now I want a man like Putin, who doesn't drink.
FEATURES
By Monica Eng and Monica Eng,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 14, 2000
CHICAGO -- From tai chi to ginseng to yoga, Americans have long looked East for antidotes to stress. But David Cho thinks he has found the ultimate Asian import to defrazzle the American psyche. It's shaped like a Coke can, is about the size of a photo booth and holds up to three people in its cozy confines. It is not a tall, skinny hot tub, but what Cho calls a "cyber jukebox." This new invention has nothing to do with the Internet. Instead, it is essentially a portable karaoke booth that Cho believes will lower the blood pressure of the American masses.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 20, 1999
The 50-member Arundel Vocal Arts Society concluded its 15th season Saturday with "Songs for My Uncle Sam -- An American Songbook," a rousing production directed by Glenette Schumacher and accompanied by Cynthia Slate on piano, Helen Schlaich on woodwind, Ginger Turner on trumpet, Peter Hengen on bass and William Watson on percussion.The program was a patriotic melange drawn from musical theater, folk songs, and pop songs of the World War II era. The society presented a Broadway combination, including a song from Johnny Mercer's seldom-heard "Li'l Abner," familiar George M. Cohan tunes of "George M" and most of the songs from the less familiar "1776."
FEATURES
By Monica Eng and Monica Eng,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 14, 2000
CHICAGO -- From tai chi to ginseng to yoga, Americans have long looked East for antidotes to stress. But David Cho thinks he has found the ultimate Asian import to defrazzle the American psyche. It's shaped like a Coke can, is about the size of a photo booth and holds up to three people in its cozy confines. It is not a tall, skinny hot tub, but what Cho calls a "cyber jukebox." This new invention has nothing to do with the Internet. Instead, it is essentially a portable karaoke booth that Cho believes will lower the blood pressure of the American masses.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | November 26, 1995
WHEN WORLD-REnowned soprano Kathleen Battle gave her first recital in Baltimore, the city was mired in ice so thick one risked life and limb merely to walk on the sidewalks. Yet nobody who had a ticket stayed home because of the weather. There wasn't an empty seat at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall that night.Question: If people will travel through snow and sleet to hear Ms. Battle perform two hours worth of 100-year-old tunes sung in incomprehensible German, French and Italian, what might they do were the diva to sing pop songs in English?
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | January 30, 1996
When Alanis Morissette was 10, she recorded her first single for a tiny label in her hometown of Ottawa, Canada. When she was 11, she was a regular on the children's television show "You Can't Do That on TV." When she was 15, she had a successful career recording bright, happy dance-pop in Canada, where she released two albums and won a Juno (the Canadian equivalent to the Grammy).And when she was 20, she released an album called "Jagged Little Pill." Full of songs about anger, lust and courage, it struck a chord with listeners -- particularly young women -- that continues to reverberate.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | November 26, 1995
WHEN WORLD-REnowned soprano Kathleen Battle gave her first recital in Baltimore, the city was mired in ice so thick one risked life and limb merely to walk on the sidewalks. Yet nobody who had a ticket stayed home because of the weather. There wasn't an empty seat at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall that night.Question: If people will travel through snow and sleet to hear Ms. Battle perform two hours worth of 100-year-old tunes sung in incomprehensible German, French and Italian, what might they do were the diva to sing pop songs in English?
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