Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPop Artists
IN THE NEWS

Pop Artists

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | August 15, 1993
What: "Hand-Painted Pop: American Art in Transition, 1955-1962"Where: Whitney Museum of American Art, Madison Avenue and 75th Street, New YorkWhen: 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays through Sundays, 1 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursdays, through Oct. 10Admission: $6 adults; $5 students and seniors$ Call: (212) 570-3676New York -- Stylistically and philosophically, there could not be much more difference between any two art movements than there is between the abstract expressionism of the 1940s and 1950s and pop art, which succeeded it in the 1960s.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | January 1, 2009
Ralph Otis Fisher, a versatile drummer who performed at jazz clubs and did studio work with 1970s pop artists, died of cancer Saturday at his Randallstown home. He was 61. Over the past five decades, he played rhythm and blues, jazz and gospel at numerous clubs and private parties and was one of Baltimore's best-known drummers. "He had the right timing. He had the right touch. He had the right feel," said singer Ethel Ennis. "Speaking as a vocalist, he was a take-care-of-you drummer." Born and raised in Frederick, he first showed an interest in percussion when, as a child, he would hammer out musical rhythms on his family's kitchen chairs.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Glenn Mcnatt and Glenn Mcnatt,Sun art critic | June 11, 2008
Jim Dine, whose inventive prints and drawings are on view at the Baltimore Museum of Art, belonged to the generation of Pop artists that succeeded the Abstract-Expressionists of the 1950s. Ever since, Dine has been trying - with notable lack of success - to shake the Pop label applied to such better-known contemporaries as Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein. History is replete with examples of artists who, for one reason or another, hate being tagged by the movements that made them famous.
FEATURES
By Glenn Mcnatt and Glenn Mcnatt,Sun art critic | June 11, 2008
Jim Dine, whose inventive prints and drawings are on view at the Baltimore Museum of Art, belonged to the generation of Pop artists that succeeded the Abstract-Expressionists of the 1950s. Ever since, Dine has been trying - with notable lack of success - to shake the Pop label applied to such better-known contemporaries as Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein. History is replete with examples of artists who, for one reason or another, hate being tagged by the movements that made them famous.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | April 16, 1998
In the 1960s, when Jim Dine first became famous as an artist, he was misunderstood, and the misunderstanding has lasted in some people's minds right down to the present.His imagery of everyday objects was the cause. A Dine picture might be of a man's tie, or a robe, or a bathroom fixture. So critics linked him with the pop artists, who also pictured the everyday, whether it was Andy Warhol's Brillo boxes or Claes Oldenburg's baked potatoes or Roy Lichtenstein's comic-strip characters.But Dine always protested that he was never a pop artist, and his work bears him out. His painterly images never looked impersonal and mass-produced, and whatever he depicted he endowed with too much beauty and emotional content for his work to be one with the ironic, deadpan images of the pop artists.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 5, 2003
It's ugly out here. Mud cakes your shoes, and the rain soaks through your shirt as you mill about the National Mall in Washington. You're here for NFL Kickoff Live, a bombastic pop prelude to last night's season-opening game, the Redskins vs. the Jets. But before the helmets start banging, you're going to get an earful, and an eyeful, courtesy of a potpourri of pop artists that includes local boys Good Charlotte, Aerosmith, Mary J. Blige, Britney Spears and Aretha Franklin. All thanks, of course, to our sponsors.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | November 26, 1995
WHEN WORLD-REnowned soprano Kathleen Battle gave her first recital in Baltimore, the city was mired in ice so thick one risked life and limb merely to walk on the sidewalks. Yet nobody who had a ticket stayed home because of the weather. There wasn't an empty seat at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall that night.Question: If people will travel through snow and sleet to hear Ms. Battle perform two hours worth of 100-year-old tunes sung in incomprehensible German, French and Italian, what might they do were the diva to sing pop songs in English?
FEATURES
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 12, 1991
WashingtonPeter Max, where have you been?Where have you been since the Summer of Love, since we plastered our rooms with your psychedelic posters, covered our loose-leafs with your flower-power petals, slept on your sheets, sported your clothes, told time by your clocks?Peter Max, where have you been since we've all grown up?"I joined the human race," says the legendary pop artist of the '60s who virtually defined the decade with his vivid, new-age style and ubiquitous mod Max products. "I went into retreat."
FEATURES
By Liz Smith and Liz Smith,Tribune Media Services | June 5, 2007
AND SO Paris Hilton is now in the clink, a bigger "star" than when she was sentenced and sure to emerge even more fascinating to those who adore her numbing charisma. But before she started paying her debt to society, my pal the writer Hal Lifson ran into her in Hollywood. Paris was being creative at Color Me Mine, a paint-it-yourself ceramics shop. Paris was creating clever bowls for her mom, Kathy, and her sister, Nicky. Something to remember her by before her brutal incarceration transforms her into a tough-talking moll, living on the edge, hanging around with disreputable types.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glen Elsasser and Glen Elsasser,Chicago Tribune | January 17, 1999
NEW YORK -- Andy Warhol captured the 1960s in all its giddy heights of narcissism, exhibitionism and consumerism -- an artistic quest that made an indelible impression on popular culture and brought him celebrity and wealth. Now, nearly a dozen years after his death, Warhol's little-known spiritual side has emerged from an under-explored body of the pop artist's works.A pious Catholic, Warhol produced more than 100 drawings, prints and paintings with religious themes. Among them are a monumental series of at least 40 paintings inspired by the familiar "Last Supper" of Leonardo da Vinci that Berkeley art historian Jane Daggett Dillenberger describes as the largest series of religious art by a major American artist.
FEATURES
By Liz Smith and Liz Smith,Tribune Media Services | June 5, 2007
AND SO Paris Hilton is now in the clink, a bigger "star" than when she was sentenced and sure to emerge even more fascinating to those who adore her numbing charisma. But before she started paying her debt to society, my pal the writer Hal Lifson ran into her in Hollywood. Paris was being creative at Color Me Mine, a paint-it-yourself ceramics shop. Paris was creating clever bowls for her mom, Kathy, and her sister, Nicky. Something to remember her by before her brutal incarceration transforms her into a tough-talking moll, living on the edge, hanging around with disreputable types.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 5, 2003
It's ugly out here. Mud cakes your shoes, and the rain soaks through your shirt as you mill about the National Mall in Washington. You're here for NFL Kickoff Live, a bombastic pop prelude to last night's season-opening game, the Redskins vs. the Jets. But before the helmets start banging, you're going to get an earful, and an eyeful, courtesy of a potpourri of pop artists that includes local boys Good Charlotte, Aerosmith, Mary J. Blige, Britney Spears and Aretha Franklin. All thanks, of course, to our sponsors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glen Elsasser and Glen Elsasser,Chicago Tribune | January 17, 1999
NEW YORK -- Andy Warhol captured the 1960s in all its giddy heights of narcissism, exhibitionism and consumerism -- an artistic quest that made an indelible impression on popular culture and brought him celebrity and wealth. Now, nearly a dozen years after his death, Warhol's little-known spiritual side has emerged from an under-explored body of the pop artist's works.A pious Catholic, Warhol produced more than 100 drawings, prints and paintings with religious themes. Among them are a monumental series of at least 40 paintings inspired by the familiar "Last Supper" of Leonardo da Vinci that Berkeley art historian Jane Daggett Dillenberger describes as the largest series of religious art by a major American artist.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | April 16, 1998
In the 1960s, when Jim Dine first became famous as an artist, he was misunderstood, and the misunderstanding has lasted in some people's minds right down to the present.His imagery of everyday objects was the cause. A Dine picture might be of a man's tie, or a robe, or a bathroom fixture. So critics linked him with the pop artists, who also pictured the everyday, whether it was Andy Warhol's Brillo boxes or Claes Oldenburg's baked potatoes or Roy Lichtenstein's comic-strip characters.But Dine always protested that he was never a pop artist, and his work bears him out. His painterly images never looked impersonal and mass-produced, and whatever he depicted he endowed with too much beauty and emotional content for his work to be one with the ironic, deadpan images of the pop artists.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | November 26, 1995
WHEN WORLD-REnowned soprano Kathleen Battle gave her first recital in Baltimore, the city was mired in ice so thick one risked life and limb merely to walk on the sidewalks. Yet nobody who had a ticket stayed home because of the weather. There wasn't an empty seat at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall that night.Question: If people will travel through snow and sleet to hear Ms. Battle perform two hours worth of 100-year-old tunes sung in incomprehensible German, French and Italian, what might they do were the diva to sing pop songs in English?
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | August 15, 1993
What: "Hand-Painted Pop: American Art in Transition, 1955-1962"Where: Whitney Museum of American Art, Madison Avenue and 75th Street, New YorkWhen: 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays through Sundays, 1 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursdays, through Oct. 10Admission: $6 adults; $5 students and seniors$ Call: (212) 570-3676New York -- Stylistically and philosophically, there could not be much more difference between any two art movements than there is between the abstract expressionism of the 1940s and 1950s and pop art, which succeeded it in the 1960s.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | January 1, 2009
Ralph Otis Fisher, a versatile drummer who performed at jazz clubs and did studio work with 1970s pop artists, died of cancer Saturday at his Randallstown home. He was 61. Over the past five decades, he played rhythm and blues, jazz and gospel at numerous clubs and private parties and was one of Baltimore's best-known drummers. "He had the right timing. He had the right touch. He had the right feel," said singer Ethel Ennis. "Speaking as a vocalist, he was a take-care-of-you drummer." Born and raised in Frederick, he first showed an interest in percussion when, as a child, he would hammer out musical rhythms on his family's kitchen chairs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2003
Nelly and the St. Lunatics / DAR Constitution Hall With two multiplatinum albums under his belt, Nelly has become one of the busiest hip-hop/pop artists to emerge in the last two years. He and his group, the St. Lunatics, will keep it hot as they blaze through DAR Constitution Hall Saturday night. Show starts at 8 p.m. Tickets are $45 and available through Ticketmaster by calling 410-481-SEAT or visiting www.ticketmaster.com. American Idol / MCI Center Pop Tart presents American Idol Live, the splashy, glorified karaoke show featuring most of the top 12 finalists from the hit Fox show.
FEATURES
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 12, 1991
WashingtonPeter Max, where have you been?Where have you been since the Summer of Love, since we plastered our rooms with your psychedelic posters, covered our loose-leafs with your flower-power petals, slept on your sheets, sported your clothes, told time by your clocks?Peter Max, where have you been since we've all grown up?"I joined the human race," says the legendary pop artist of the '60s who virtually defined the decade with his vivid, new-age style and ubiquitous mod Max products. "I went into retreat."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.