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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | April 21, 2005
Roy Lichtenstein was one of the most important figures of the pop art movement of the 1960s. Lichtenstein's clever paintings, drawings and sculpture based on comic-book images taught an art world used to the high seriousness of abstract-expressionism that art could also be fun. So when the National Gallery of Art announced this month that the artist's family had donated more than a dozen of his drawings to the museum in memory of Jane Meyerhoff, the...
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NEWS
April 23, 2005
James A. Houston, 83, an artist who brought an appreciation of Inuit art to audiences around the world when he lived in the Canadian Arctic in the 1950s and 60s, died Sunday in New London, Conn. Mr. Houston was a master designer at the renowned Steuben Glass Co. in New York City, where he worked for the past 43 years Among his best-known works were Arctic Fisherman, a sculpture showing an Inuit fisherman preparing to spear a fish in the water, and Trout & Fly, in which a fish leaps to catch a gold fly. Mr. Houston was also the author of numerous adult and children's books.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | August 19, 2001
Jasper Johns, whose paintings of flags, targets, numerals, logos and other commonplace signs made him one of the most important American artists of the postwar era, occupies a curiously ambiguous position on the cusp of modern and contemporary art. Johns' breakthrough painting, the enigmatic and eponymously titled Flag of 1954-1955, was both an extension of the modernist aesthetic of abstract expressionism and a harbinger of the pop art of the 1960s, which,...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | April 21, 2005
Roy Lichtenstein was one of the most important figures of the pop art movement of the 1960s. Lichtenstein's clever paintings, drawings and sculpture based on comic-book images taught an art world used to the high seriousness of abstract-expressionism that art could also be fun. So when the National Gallery of Art announced this month that the artist's family had donated more than a dozen of his drawings to the museum in memory of Jane Meyerhoff, the...
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 26, 2000
What do John Wayne, Mick Jagger, Coca-Cola bottles, dollar bills, Campbell's soup cans, Marilyn Monroe and Apollo astronauts have in common? As most baby boomers can tell you, all were images celebrated in the art of Andy Warhol, the Pittsburgh-born commercial artist whose eye for the icons of American culture did so much to set off the Pop Art craze of the 1960s. Famous for pioneering the process whereby a photographic image is transferred to a silk screen, then placed on a canvas and inked at the back, Warhol became one of the most debated and influential artists of the late 20th century.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 22, 2004
Renee and Don Gorman are prolific collectors of pop art. They own everything from airbrushed poster portraits, to ceramics, to folksy African-inspired clay masks. There is even a full-size female mannequin in formal wear gracing a corner of their great room. Fifteen years ago, Don Gorman's father gave the couple a plot of land next door to the house where his son grew up. They decided to build a home of temple-like proportions to adequately display their vast art collection. Nestled in a Pikesville neighborhood of Colonials, two-story bungalows and ranchers, the Gorman home is decidedly contemporary.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | August 15, 1993
At 71, Grace Hartigan is still, as she always has been, a searcher. She greets a visitor to her Fells Point studio and living space, in the city she has called home since 1960, and announces that her work is undergoing yet another major change. She's left the Seurat-like, pointillist style in which she was working for several years and is now doing paintings with much more drawing in them. Her work in the pointillist style, though, was hailed as some of her best work in decades, so she's taking a big chance.
NEWS
April 23, 2005
James A. Houston, 83, an artist who brought an appreciation of Inuit art to audiences around the world when he lived in the Canadian Arctic in the 1950s and 60s, died Sunday in New London, Conn. Mr. Houston was a master designer at the renowned Steuben Glass Co. in New York City, where he worked for the past 43 years Among his best-known works were Arctic Fisherman, a sculpture showing an Inuit fisherman preparing to spear a fish in the water, and Trout & Fly, in which a fish leaps to catch a gold fly. Mr. Houston was also the author of numerous adult and children's books.
NEWS
April 6, 1995
The Rev. Carl H. Mau Jr., 72, a sixth-generation American minister who led the international Lutheran movement during a critical period of realignment and initiative in the 1970s and 1980s, died of cancer Friday in Des Moines, Wash. near his home in Seattle. As general secretary of the Lutheran World Federation from 1974 to 1985, he helped redefine the relationships among the organization's 120 national church bodies, representing about 60 million Lutherans around the world.Ralph A. Weller, 73, a retired executive who led Otis Elevator Co. through a period of robust growth, died of an undisclosed cause Friday in Walnut Creek, Calif.
NEWS
December 29, 2004
HER RECOLLECTION of lying in bed as a youngster, looking at the volumes in her bookcase, wasn't particularly original or unconventional or provocative. "A book was like stepping through a mirror," Susan Sontag once said. "I could go somewhere else. Each one was a door to a whole new kingdom." But each door she opened, every literary, philosophical, cultural and social landscape she explored, sharpened her thinking and writing, which in turn opened innumerable doors for those daring to venture out. Her looking glass often conveyed an image of the world that challenged conventional thinking.
NEWS
December 29, 2004
HER RECOLLECTION of lying in bed as a youngster, looking at the volumes in her bookcase, wasn't particularly original or unconventional or provocative. "A book was like stepping through a mirror," Susan Sontag once said. "I could go somewhere else. Each one was a door to a whole new kingdom." But each door she opened, every literary, philosophical, cultural and social landscape she explored, sharpened her thinking and writing, which in turn opened innumerable doors for those daring to venture out. Her looking glass often conveyed an image of the world that challenged conventional thinking.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 22, 2004
Renee and Don Gorman are prolific collectors of pop art. They own everything from airbrushed poster portraits, to ceramics, to folksy African-inspired clay masks. There is even a full-size female mannequin in formal wear gracing a corner of their great room. Fifteen years ago, Don Gorman's father gave the couple a plot of land next door to the house where his son grew up. They decided to build a home of temple-like proportions to adequately display their vast art collection. Nestled in a Pikesville neighborhood of Colonials, two-story bungalows and ranchers, the Gorman home is decidedly contemporary.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | September 23, 2001
Since childhood, I've heard hundreds of attempts to answer the question "What is art?". The best answer for me is: Art's what changes people. Real art's defining purpose is to force sentient humans to reconsider their perceptions and the mechanisms by which they perceive. In whatever form art takes, its mission is to jolt the senses. For the last few days, my occasional refuge from the barbaric events of Sept. 11 has been to consider art's purpose, particularly in the context of the life of Andy Warhol.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | August 19, 2001
Jasper Johns, whose paintings of flags, targets, numerals, logos and other commonplace signs made him one of the most important American artists of the postwar era, occupies a curiously ambiguous position on the cusp of modern and contemporary art. Johns' breakthrough painting, the enigmatic and eponymously titled Flag of 1954-1955, was both an extension of the modernist aesthetic of abstract expressionism and a harbinger of the pop art of the 1960s, which,...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | March 11, 2001
As a child growing up in New York City, I often had occasion to pass our neighborhood bakery, whose large plate glass windows seemed eternally lined with row upon row of tempting confections. No matter how urgent my mission, I always found time to linger in front of this display, and to admire the stacked cylinders of white wedding cakes with their tiny plastic brides and grooms on top, looking down on regimented files of cookies, eclairs and other pastry treats arrayed with what seemed like military precision.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 26, 2000
What do John Wayne, Mick Jagger, Coca-Cola bottles, dollar bills, Campbell's soup cans, Marilyn Monroe and Apollo astronauts have in common? As most baby boomers can tell you, all were images celebrated in the art of Andy Warhol, the Pittsburgh-born commercial artist whose eye for the icons of American culture did so much to set off the Pop Art craze of the 1960s. Famous for pioneering the process whereby a photographic image is transferred to a silk screen, then placed on a canvas and inked at the back, Warhol became one of the most debated and influential artists of the late 20th century.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | March 19, 1998
World Championship WrestlingCheer on your favorite wrestlers when they battle it out on the mat at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Baltimore Arena, 201 W. Baltimore St. The World Championship Wrestling blastoff includes Hollywood Hulk Hogan and the Sting, Nature Boy Ric Flair and Curt Hennig, Bret "Hit Man" Hart vs. Scott Hall, and Bill Goldberg vs. Jerry Flynn. In team competition, Diamond Dallas Page and Chris Benoit take on Raven and Perry Saturn and Juventud Guerrera and Lizmark Jr. battle Phychosis and Laparka.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | February 1, 1994
Carol Reed's large charcoal and graphite drawings with collage elements -- part of a three-person show just opened at School 33 -- are powerful and subtle. They have the ability to draw you into a communication that gets richer the longer you stay with them.They are abstract, with broad curved and angled black shapes anchoring the images and other elements that play off them, including smudges, splatters, erasures and pieces of collaged paper. At first glance, they don't directly refer to anything.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | September 10, 2000
The majority of women in this country are under 5 feet 5 inches tall. So, why do the fashion runways all show lanky goddesses modeling the clothes we're supposed to covet? That's what Baltimore-native Melissa London (pictured, left) wondered before she finally did something about it and created itsybits.com, a stylish new Web site aimed at the, ahem, vertically challenged woman. "I started the site," says London, all 5 feet 2 inches of her, "because all my life I've had to work twice as hard to find clothes that worked for me and then pay double to get them altered."
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | June 22, 1999
The gravity-defying sculptures of John Van Alstine, on view at C. Grimaldis Gallery through July 10, seem perfectly fitted to critic Arthur C. Danto's clever postmodern definition of art.Danto wrote that for a work to be considered art, it must fulfill two conditions. First, it has to be "about" something. And second, it must embody its meaning in the way it is constructed.This is, admittedly, a rather expansive definition of art -- some would argue that it is almost useless -- but it does have the advantage of being able to encompass such widely divergent works as, say, a Madonna by Raphael, a drip painting by Pollack and a Brillo box by Warhol.
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