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December 6, 2012
Why are all these casinos being built with all the unemployed people living here in the United States? Sure, the housing may be on the upswing, but that doesn't say or mean that more people have more money. Yes, casinos may be competing with another, but more casinos will make more people poorer. Yes, a few might get rich, but how many of these people will know when to say, "Stop. " More casinos will bring more gangs and add to the population in the gangs already here. Who pays for these casinos?
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Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | April 20, 2014
Social issues are labeled "wedge issues" for a reason. They appeal to emotion. They are easily communicated. They count when ballots are cast. Throw in poll-tested rhetoric and effective manipulation of facts, and there you have it: the capture of an important voting bloc. I do not know the genesis of the term. It may have been hatched in a Nixon-era appeal to southern white conservative Democrats none too happy with court ordered school desegregation and a sharp left-hand turn by a McGovern-ite Democratic Party in 1972.
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By MIKE LITTWIN | September 2, 1994
A column in yesterday's editions gave the wrong first name for state Del. Louis L. DePazzo, a Dundalk Democrat.The Sun regrets the errors.You want to hear a scary story? Thanks to the federal government, that collection of godless bureaucrats who want only to do harm to America, 285 poor families in Baltimore will move to a better neighborhood this fall.Here's the scary part. One of those families -- maybe even two or three -- could move to your neighborhood.Scared? Well, they're scared in eastern Baltimore County.
NEWS
Leonard Pitts Jr and Leonard Pitts Jr | April 3, 2014
"We have got this tailspin of culture, in our inner cities in particular, of men not working and just generations of men not even thinking about working or learning the value and the culture of work. " -- Rep. Paul Ryan "You're facilitating the problem if you give an animal or a (poor) person ample food supply. They will reproduce, especially ones that don't think too much further than that. " -- former South Carolina Lt. Gov. Andre Bauer "There are 47 percent who are ... dependent upon government, who believe they are victims, who believe government has a responsibility to care for them.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2013
A bill to ban the Maryland Transit Administration's practice of recording conversations on its buses has been filed by two state senators. James Brochin, a Baltimore County Democrat, and Allan Kittleman, a Republican representing Howard and Carroll counties, want the MTA to stop installing microphones and deactivate units in use by Oct. 1. "I have spoken to the MTA, and I have a philosophical difference with them," said Brochin. "What I discuss on the bus is nobody's business but my own. " Agency spokesman Terry Owens said the recordings give police additional assistance to investigate incidents and are not being used for surveillance.
NEWS
Leonard Pitts Jr and Leonard Pitts Jr | April 3, 2014
"We have got this tailspin of culture, in our inner cities in particular, of men not working and just generations of men not even thinking about working or learning the value and the culture of work. " -- Rep. Paul Ryan "You're facilitating the problem if you give an animal or a (poor) person ample food supply. They will reproduce, especially ones that don't think too much further than that. " -- former South Carolina Lt. Gov. Andre Bauer "There are 47 percent who are ... dependent upon government, who believe they are victims, who believe government has a responsibility to care for them.
NEWS
By George Neff Luca | January 9, 1995
Ere the Speaker first sat in his chair.A four-and-a-half millionaire,Poor Newt paid the price'Cause it wouldn't look niceTo the other poor people out there.
NEWS
June 12, 1994
For more than three decades, the United States has been sending small armies of people to poor countries to aid economic development efforts. Now, when Americans have plenty of reason to be concerned about their own economic well-being, many voters are beginning to look askance at the money spent on foreign aid. The partnership inaugurated this past week between Baltimore and the U.S. Agency for International Development is aimed at finding ways to apply...
NEWS
August 1, 2013
I was very disappointed that you would include former Baltimore City Mayor Sheila Dixon as one of your 50 women leaders to watch ( "50 women to watch in Baltimore," July 22). She was a horrible mayor who stole from the city and poor people, and we are paying her a large pension from city tax money for the rest of her life. Is this the type of woman that you think we should watch? Perhaps we should, but only to make sure she doesn't steal from anyone else. Lynne Braverman
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2013
A fellow editor takes note of this passage from a New York Times article out of Quinapondan, Philippines:  “My people are starving,” he tells the government workers, whose requisition notebooks do not favor this rural flyspeck, population 16,525. It's all in perspective. Before I became a big-time journalist and subordinate member of the East Coast liberal media establishment, I grew up in a little tobacco-farming town, Elizaville, Kentucky, population then about 100. The county seat, Flemingsburg, had about 2,000.
NEWS
January 15, 2014
The problem with giving poor people the choice to "cash out" of the welfare system is the number of opportunities it affords for even more abuses ( "Escaping the rat maze of the welfare state," Jan. 13). If recipients choose to take the cash, then lose it, they'll go right back on welfare, frustrating the purpose of giving them money in the first place. People could just take the money, spend it on whatever they like, and end up back on welfare. If we decide to not allow them back on welfare, then some people could die as a result of their poor financial planning.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | January 13, 2014
This week marks the 50th anniversary of Lyndon Johnson's "War on Poverty," and as the joke goes, "Poverty won. " Five decades after a blizzard of programs began descending on the American people, the poverty rate remains essentially unchanged. That's a little unfair. What counts as poverty today would not have seemed so impoverished 50 years ago, when many of the poor lived without electricity and were no strangers to hunger. Today, the biggest health problems of the poor are more likely to stem from obesity than anything approaching starvation.
NEWS
December 10, 2013
While Maryland officials remain at odds about implementing poor people's constitutional guarantee to counsel at first appearances ("Maryland has an opportunity to lead the way in bail reform," Nov. 29), the judiciary can help break the logjam and demonstrate the benefits of taking a humanitarian approach toward the people expected to spend Christmas and New Year's in jail while awaiting trial on non-violent charges. Maryland law requires every administrative judge to conduct a weekly review of the pretrial jail population.
NEWS
November 20, 2013
It was bad enough that the Baltimore County Council created bad policy and bad precedent when it blocked construction of new affordable housing in the Rosedale community this week. What was worse was how it was done, in such transparently bad faith. This decision wasn't the result of a rational discussion about how to meet the housing needs of the county's growing population of low-income residents. Rather it was the raw expression of a universal cry among fearful homeowners: "Not in my back yard!"
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2013
A fellow editor takes note of this passage from a New York Times article out of Quinapondan, Philippines:  “My people are starving,” he tells the government workers, whose requisition notebooks do not favor this rural flyspeck, population 16,525. It's all in perspective. Before I became a big-time journalist and subordinate member of the East Coast liberal media establishment, I grew up in a little tobacco-farming town, Elizaville, Kentucky, population then about 100. The county seat, Flemingsburg, had about 2,000.
NEWS
November 5, 2013
I find it both disturbing and ironic that Nov. 1 marked the latest example of Congress and the White House finding common ground. The Nov. 2 Baltimore Sun article "Cuts to food stamps will affect 47 million needy Americans" provided the lens for my perspective: "Though the cut was intended to come as the economy improved, the recovery has yet to lift many Americans on food stamps out of poverty. " It's disturbing because sequestration and budget deals have brought us to the point where we are now taking food off the already half empty plates of poor people.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 29, 1993
WASHINGTON -- As part of its health-care plan, the Clinton administration is considering a proposal to dismantle the Medicaid program and integrate low-income people into the same networks of doctors, hospitals and private insurance companies that would serve more affluent people, administration officials say.But poor people would probably receive medical and social services beyond the standard package of health benefits to be guaranteed to all Americans, the...
NEWS
By Julianne Malveaux | May 8, 1998
THIRTY years ago, the Rev. Ralph David Abernathy led caravans of people to Washington in the Poor People's March to protest poverty and racial discrimination. Abernathy had picked up the baton from the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., but who has picked up the baton from Abernathy?A generation ago, it was possible to rally people to the nation's capital on such issues, but today poor people have become the targets of our nation's contempt.How else do we explain congressional reluctance to increase the minimum wage by just a dollar an hour?
NEWS
October 29, 2013
Grocery prices may be rising - 1.5 to 2.5 percent next year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture - but the ability of poor people to buy them is about to shrink. On Friday, benefits for 47.6 million Americans participating in the Supplement Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), more commonly referred to as food stamps, will be reduced. The size of that reduction is substantial - about $5 billion per year nationwide - and it amounts to about $36 less for a low-income family of four or $11 for an individual.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2013
The Maryland judiciary has formed a special task force to examine the implications of a Court of Appeals ruling that people charged with crimes should have access to public defenders at all bail hearings. The panel will be led by Baltimore District Judge John R. Hargrove, Jr., the judiciary said Friday. The state's justice system is reckoning with several aspects of the decision, including the potential that Maryland's busy public defenders will have to attend as many as 180,000 additional proceedings each year.
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