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By KENT BAKER | April 1, 1999
The Maryland Racing Commission has voted not to extend the off-track betting license of Poor Jimmy's Restaurant in Cecil County, although its management and the Maryland Jockey Club have reached a tentative agreement to improve the facility.Poor Jimmy's license expired yesterday and the matter now cannot be addressed until the April meeting of the commission.Commission chairman John Franzone was in California on business yesterday, but a phone poll of commission members was conducted.Pub Date: 4/1/99
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By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | September 15, 2000
NORTH EAST - The much-maligned Poor Jimmy's off-track betting parlor in Cecil County was to reopen today with a new name, a dramatically new look and the potential for serving as a model for similar parlors in Timonium, Montgomery County and downtown Baltimore. The newly christened Northeast Racing and Sports Club was unveiled this week by Joe De Francis, president and CEO of the Maryland Jockey Club, which manages OTBs in the state. He showed off the facility on Route 40 to a select group of officials and racing fans.
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SPORTS
October 27, 1999
The Maryland Jockey Club will take over the Poor Jimmy's off-track betting parlor in Cecil County and spend more than $250,000 to upgrade what it views as a crucial link in the state's simulcast betting network.Martin Jacobs, general counsel of the Maryland Jockey Club, outlined the plan yesterday at the monthly meeting of the state's racing commissioners at Laurel Park. They approved it unanimously.Jacobs said the Maryland Jockey Club has signed a 15-year agreement to lease Poor Jimmy's so that "we can make this facility into one our commission and industry can be proud of."
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2000
Angered by another delay in renovating the Poor Jimmy's off-track betting parlor, the Maryland Racing Commission threatened yesterday to fine the Maryland Jockey Club or revoke its license if it did not reopen the Cecil County OTB by Sept. 15. That is the latest in a series of reopening dates offered by MJC officials as they attempt to turn the rundown betting parlor into what they promise will be a state-of-the-art OTB. Meeting at Pimlico, racing commissioners reacted angrily to the news.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | November 25, 1998
FORT WASHINGTON -- The Maryland Racing Commission flabbergasted onlookers -- particularly representatives of the Maryland Jockey Club -- when it voted unanimously yesterday not to renew the off-track betting license of Poor Jimmy's restaurant in Cecil County.The action followed several years of debate about problems at the facility, which was recently upgraded with $100,000 in improvements, the majority of which were underwritten by track management, which operates the betting parlor there.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1999
The company that owns Pimlico and Laurel racetracks said yesterday that it has reached an agreement that will let it replace its shut-down off-track betting outlet in Cecil County with a large, modern parlor designed to attract a new generation of bettors.Martin Jacobs, general counsel of the Maryland Jockey Club, told the Maryland Racing Commission that the company plans to open a betting facility in Elkton this fall. He said the parlor would occupy 16,750 square feet in an existing building in Big Elk Shopping Center.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1999
CHESAPEAKE CITY -- Representatives of the Maryland Jockey Club and Poor Jimmy's Restaurant in Cecil County will huddle this afternoon to try to hammer out an agreement that would allow the restaurant to continue operating as an off-track betting facility beyond the March 31 expiration of its license.That was the outcome of a lively give-and-take session at the monthly Maryland Racing Commission meeting yesterday at posh Winbak Farm (formerly Windfields), one of the largest breeding operations in America.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1999
In a dramatic and costly turnabout, the Maryland Jockey Club has decided to spend more than $1 million transforming the Poor Jimmy's off-track betting parlor in Cecil County into a "showplace" for future OTBs in the state.Joe De Francis, president and CEO of the Maryland Jockey Club, told the Maryland Racing Commission at its monthly meeting yesterday at Laurel Park that "we're poised on the brink of finally creating a facility everybody involved in Maryland racing will be very, very proud of."
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2000
Angered by another delay in renovating the Poor Jimmy's off-track betting parlor, the Maryland Racing Commission threatened yesterday to fine the Maryland Jockey Club or revoke its license if it did not reopen the Cecil County OTB by Sept. 15. That is the latest in a series of reopening dates offered by MJC officials as they attempt to turn the rundown betting parlor into what they promise will be a state-of-the-art OTB. Meeting at Pimlico, racing commissioners reacted angrily to the news.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1998
Poor Jimmy's, the beleaguered off-track betting parlor in Cecil County facing shutdown Dec. 31, received a conditional, three-month reprieve yesterday from the Maryland Racing Commission.Commissioners agreed to let the OTB operation, managed by the Maryland Jockey Club in a separately run North East steakhouse, operate until the club's lease expires March 31 if certain repairs are made and furnishings are upgraded quickly.Several commissioners and jockey club officials will meet at Poor Jimmy's during the first week of January to agree on a list of desired improvements.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1999
In a dramatic and costly turnabout, the Maryland Jockey Club has decided to spend more than $1 million transforming the Poor Jimmy's off-track betting parlor in Cecil County into a "showplace" for future OTBs in the state.Joe De Francis, president and CEO of the Maryland Jockey Club, told the Maryland Racing Commission at its monthly meeting yesterday at Laurel Park that "we're poised on the brink of finally creating a facility everybody involved in Maryland racing will be very, very proud of."
SPORTS
October 27, 1999
The Maryland Jockey Club will take over the Poor Jimmy's off-track betting parlor in Cecil County and spend more than $250,000 to upgrade what it views as a crucial link in the state's simulcast betting network.Martin Jacobs, general counsel of the Maryland Jockey Club, outlined the plan yesterday at the monthly meeting of the state's racing commissioners at Laurel Park. They approved it unanimously.Jacobs said the Maryland Jockey Club has signed a 15-year agreement to lease Poor Jimmy's so that "we can make this facility into one our commission and industry can be proud of."
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1999
The Maryland Racing Commission, concerned about losing money to Pennsylvania racetracks that offer telephone betting accounts, is pushing to establish a competing service here.At a meeting yesterday, the commission expressed frustration that regulations that would permit telephone wagering in Maryland have languished at the Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation.The commission had received no reply to its May 10 letter requesting the department give it a status report."It's aggravating to me that we are not moving forward," said Maryland trainer Bill Boniface, who attended the meeting held at the Darlington farm of Frank Hopkins, a commission member.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1999
The company that owns Pimlico and Laurel racetracks said yesterday that it has reached an agreement that will let it replace its shut-down off-track betting outlet in Cecil County with a large, modern parlor designed to attract a new generation of bettors.Martin Jacobs, general counsel of the Maryland Jockey Club, told the Maryland Racing Commission that the company plans to open a betting facility in Elkton this fall. He said the parlor would occupy 16,750 square feet in an existing building in Big Elk Shopping Center.
SPORTS
By KENT BAKER | April 1, 1999
The Maryland Racing Commission has voted not to extend the off-track betting license of Poor Jimmy's Restaurant in Cecil County, although its management and the Maryland Jockey Club have reached a tentative agreement to improve the facility.Poor Jimmy's license expired yesterday and the matter now cannot be addressed until the April meeting of the commission.Commission chairman John Franzone was in California on business yesterday, but a phone poll of commission members was conducted.Pub Date: 4/1/99
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1999
CHESAPEAKE CITY -- Representatives of the Maryland Jockey Club and Poor Jimmy's Restaurant in Cecil County will huddle this afternoon to try to hammer out an agreement that would allow the restaurant to continue operating as an off-track betting facility beyond the March 31 expiration of its license.That was the outcome of a lively give-and-take session at the monthly Maryland Racing Commission meeting yesterday at posh Winbak Farm (formerly Windfields), one of the largest breeding operations in America.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | July 4, 1993
Poor Jimmy's is now becoming Rich Jimmy's for the state's harness racing industry.But followers of flat racing have not been overly impressed with daily off-track betting figures from the Cecil County restaurant.And for good reason.On many days the harness horses are outhandling the thoroughbreds.For example, last Friday about $31,000 was bet on flat horses at Poor Jimmy's. The night before $41,500 was bet on standardbreds.The reason?"It's the old Brandywine [Pa.] Raceway crowd," said Ted Snell, president of Rosecroft/Delmarva.
NEWS
December 19, 1998
THE SMOKE-FILLED dive in Cecil County called Poor Jimmy's is a reflection of how the Maryland racing industry has failed to keep up with competition from neighboring states. The Maryland Racing Commission last month yanked the off-track betting parlor's license, claiming its decrepit facilities give the state industry a poor image.Set up as a temporary OTB site by Maryland racetrack operators in 1993, Poor Jimmy's has provoked patron complaints since it opened, the second of seven state-licensed, off-track betting parlors.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1998
Poor Jimmy's, the beleaguered off-track betting parlor in Cecil County facing shutdown Dec. 31, received a conditional, three-month reprieve yesterday from the Maryland Racing Commission.Commissioners agreed to let the OTB operation, managed by the Maryland Jockey Club in a separately run North East steakhouse, operate until the club's lease expires March 31 if certain repairs are made and furnishings are upgraded quickly.Several commissioners and jockey club officials will meet at Poor Jimmy's during the first week of January to agree on a list of desired improvements.
NEWS
December 19, 1998
THE SMOKE-FILLED dive in Cecil County called Poor Jimmy's is a reflection of how the Maryland racing industry has failed to keep up with competition from neighboring states. The Maryland Racing Commission last month yanked the off-track betting parlor's license, claiming its decrepit facilities give the state industry a poor image.Set up as a temporary OTB site by Maryland racetrack operators in 1993, Poor Jimmy's has provoked patron complaints since it opened, the second of seven state-licensed, off-track betting parlors.
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