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NEWS
Susan Reimer | December 12, 2011
Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich has been castigated on the opinion pages for declaring that child labor laws "are truly stupid" and for suggesting that poor children be hired to clean the bathrooms of their schools in order to teach a work ethic they can't possibly learn at home because nobody there has a job. "Really poor children," he said at an Iowa fundraiser, "in really poor neighborhoods have no habits of working, and have...
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NEWS
June 12, 2014
Once again, new problems arise at our southern border simply because our federal legislators both past and present have failed to protect this vast border so businesses would have access to cheap labor ( "Shelter plan raises concern," June 11). The biggest losers are young black Americans, often due to poor educational opportunities and broken families. This whole dilemma was caused by our elected representatives who ignored the possibility of the calamity we now face. We have a plague that may be incurable, and it was caused by greed.
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NEWS
By Jack L. Levin | August 27, 1996
THIRTY-THREE YEARS ago tomorrow Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his ''I Have a Dream'' speech to the applause of 250,000 on the Washington Mall. Many great leaders spoke that day: A. Philip Randolph, Jr., of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters; Eugene Carson Blake, of the National Council of Churches; Walter P. Reuther, of the United Automobile Workers; Floyd B. McKissick, of the Congress of Racial Equality; Whitney M. Young Jr., of the National Urban...
NEWS
March 29, 2013
We want to thank reporter John Fritze for his article laying out the issue of out-of-pocket costs for child dental care insurance through the Maryland Health Benefit Exchange ("Advocates, insurers duel over cost of child dental coverage," March 21). The new rules by the Obama administration perhaps unintentionally eliminate the general principle of the Affordable Care Act that dental care is an essential health benefit for children. The new rule will permit pediatric dental insurance plans to charge a maximum of $1,000 per child in out-of-pocket costs and up to $2,000 for a family.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 15, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration released proposed legislation yesterday that would narrow the gap between rich and poor schools by redirecting federal education aid to give a greater share to poor districts.The "Improving America's Schools Act of 1993" would also increase federal funding to underfunded schools to $7 billion in fiscal 1995, an 11 percent increase from fiscal 1994, and would refocus existing programs to ensure that children from low-income families are encouraged to meet the same advanced academic standards now expected of middle-class children.
NEWS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | April 21, 1993
A Connecticut-based philanthropy specializing in child-oriented policy research will move its headquarters to Baltimore next year, city officials and the Annie E. Casey Foundation said yesterday.The $923 million foundation, founded by the family of one of the founders of United Parcel Service, expects to move from Greenwich, Conn., in September 1994. It is one of the 25 largest philanthropic foundations in America and the largest devoted exclusively to poor children and families, spokesman Bill Rust said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 16, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Social Security officials have found evidence that the government improperly terminated disability benefits for many poor children, misinformed parents of their legal rights and actively discouraged some parents from appealing the decisions.To remedy that situation, officials plan several changes. They said they would help parents find lawyers and would probably send notices to thousands of families giving them a new opportunity to challenge the loss of cash benefits.Children who appeal have a good chance of success.
NEWS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | April 21, 1993
A Connecticut-based philanthropy specializing in child-oriented policy research will move its headquarters to Baltimore next year, city officials and the Annie E. Casey Foundation said yesterday.The $923 million foundation, founded by the family of one of the founders of United Parcel Service, expects to move from Greenwich, Conn., in September 1994. It is one of the 25 largest philanthropic foundations in America and the largest devoted exclusively to poor children and families, spokesman Bill Rust said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 11, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Advocates for children and some administration officials are saying that President Clinton's health plan would eliminate some benefits received by millions of poor children on Medicaid, including many who are disabled.Under the health plan's package of basic services, some Medicaid recipients under 21 could lose benefits they now have, including transportation to and from a doctor, certain types of hearing and vision care, physical rehabilitation and special education services.
NEWS
By Paul West and Michael Hill and Paul West and Michael Hill,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 16, 2000
Stepping up the attack on his rival's record, Vice President Al Gore accused Gov. George W. Bush yesterday of neglecting the nutritional needs of poor children in the Lone Star State. Gore, in a speech to a Democratic audience in Baltimore, charged that Bush's record in Texas was sharply at odds with his outreach to minority voters and his attempts to portray himself as a different kind of Republican. While Bush is "trying to put the compassion into his conservatism" by posing for numerous photographs with African-Americans and Hispanics, said Gore, Texas has short-changed summer nutrition programs for thousands of poor children.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2013
It is doubtful in all of the hullabaloo and hype leading up to Super Bowl XLVII that the name of one non-football-playing Baltimorean will be mentioned: John McDonogh, the philanthropist, who left an indelible mark not only on his native city but also in New Orleans for his endowment of public schools for poor children. A reader, Bill Rowe, who graduated from McDonogh School in 1970, recently brought to my attention McDonogh's philanthropic endeavors, which probably outside of the McDonogh community have largely been forgotten.
EXPLORE
By Lisa Kawata | March 30, 2012
The historic Linwood estate has been known for many things, from hosting a Confederate general to its current mission to help children and adults with autism live a better life. But if the National Christ Child Society gets its way, the antebellum property in Ellicott City might one day become sacred ground. For it was in the whispers of a Linwood wheat field 134 years ago that an 11-year-old Mary Virginia Merrick felt the call of God on her heart and knelt among the golden stalks in prayer.
NEWS
February 2, 2012
Mitt Romney's ill-considered remark about the destitute, "I'm not concerned about the very poor," and his subsequent awkward explanation of it represented something more noteworthy than a rich man's gaffe. The question raised by the episode is not simply whether the candidate can articulate his views more clearly but whether the dire economic circumstances of tens of millions of Americans are truly understood, or can even be acknowledged, by the GOP. "We have a social safety net," Mr. Romney told his CNN interviewer Wednesday.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | December 12, 2011
Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich has been castigated on the opinion pages for declaring that child labor laws "are truly stupid" and for suggesting that poor children be hired to clean the bathrooms of their schools in order to teach a work ethic they can't possibly learn at home because nobody there has a job. "Really poor children," he said at an Iowa fundraiser, "in really poor neighborhoods have no habits of working, and have...
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | December 8, 2011
Newt Gingrich wants to pay poor kids to clean toilets. And all of the right people are horrified. The Nation says Mr. Gingrich is running on "a platform that seems to have been written by the unreformed Ebenezer Scrooge. " The editors of the Newark Star-Ledger proclaim Mr. Gingrich wants to "bring back the days of Oliver Twist. " The host of "Meet the Press," David Gregory, suggests Mr. Gingrich's take on the inner-city poor is a "grotesque distortion. " This controversy started last month at Harvard, when Mr. Gingrich suggested in a speech that perhaps the best way to break the cycle of poverty in inner cities is to break the culture of poverty that sustains it by, among other things, paying kids to do janitorial work.
NEWS
October 1, 2011
I empathize with Peter French's letter about the difficulties teachers in poor communities face ("Even without No Child Left Behind, teaching is debased," Sept. 29). My family arrived in America penniless in 1969 and we lived in the slums of Brooklyn, where I trudged through broken glass and filth to get to school every day. So I know a little about the poverty of which he speaks, and the mentality that makes children growing up in its midst difficult to teach. Too many parents behave as if they don't want to have anything to do with their children's education.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | May 30, 1993
Two of Harford's neediest elementary schools fear they'll soon lose a federal program designed to help poor children keep up with their classmates.The Chapter 1 program, which provides money for poor children at 12 county schools, likely will be dropped from Darlington and North Harford because of a cut of nearly $400,000, or about 15 percent, in federal funding for Harford, said Doris E. Carey, county supervisor of federal programs."
NEWS
February 22, 2011
The recent decision by Frederick County's Board of County Commissioners to eliminate funding to its local Head Start program was surpassed in callousness only by the statements two male commissioners subsequently chose to make on child-rearing. After voting to cut the county's $2.3 million contribution to the Head Start program, which readies preschool children from low-income families for kindergarten, commissioners C. Paul Smith and Kirby Delauter remarked that the ideal households were those in which the women stayed at home with small children, as their wives did. They said this made not only for better child-rearing but also for better marriages.
NEWS
By Robert C. Embry Jr | February 9, 2011
One of the most important recent pieces of education research was released last year — and promptly ignored. The Century Foundation's report "Housing Policy is School Policy" confirms the seminal 1966 finding of Johns Hopkins University sociologist James Coleman: The school-based variable that most profoundly affects student performance is the socioeconomic composition of the school. In short, poor children do better if they attend schools with affluent children. The "new" news in the report?
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