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By Lois Szymanski and Lois Szymanski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 20, 1997
ON JAN. 12, 10 members of Wakefield Valley Pony Club took a field trip to Horse World Expo.The expo, the first event of its kind in Maryland, offered goods for horse enthusiasts, with more than 100 vendors participating. Seminars, demonstrations, breed profiles, and training exhibitions ran at the Cow Palace at Maryland State Fairgrounds.Some of the top horse trainers in Maryland were on hand to share their expertise. For the young members of the Westminster-based branch of the U.S. Pony Club, the expo offered an opportunity to learn more about their passion while spending time together.
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SPORTS
By Aaron Kasinitz and The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2013
Janice Binkley-Cole handed what looked like a makeshift lacrosse stick to Tristan Cole and watched her smiling 10-year-old son head onto a practice field. From the time he left the sideline until he returned about 10 minutes later, Tristan's feet never touched the ground. That's because Tristan plays polocrosse, and in his sport, he doesn't walk, jog or run. He rides a pony. “The funnest part is when you get to run around [on the horse] and go really fast and have good goals,” Tristan said.
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NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | January 19, 1993
Crystal Bridge, a 7-year-old horse from Severn, suspect something big is up. Owner Marie Daniels is sure of it.Marie, 16, has scrubbed and brushed her thoroughbred, fitted him with new shoes, washed his tail and clipped his whiskers. Today she'll braid his mane.Tomorrow, Crystal Bridge goes to Washington, to strut his stuff at the 1993 inaugural parade."He was excited when they put on his shoes," said Marie, an Archbishop Spalding High School junior. "He was jigging around. He wouldn't walk quietly.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2013
Patricia du Pont, founder of the Fair Hill Pony Club who was active in animal rescue work, died Feb. 16 of complications from a stroke at her home in Fairview, Cecil County. She was 94. The daughter of Archibald du Pont, who had been CEO of the Delaware Trust Bank, and Elizabeth Hayward du Pont, a homemaker, she was born and raised in Wilmington, Del. She was a graduate of St. Timothy's School. An accomplished horsewoman, show rider and avid fox hunter, Miss du Pont enjoyed fox hunting with the Elkridge-Harford Hunt Club, and hunted with her own pack of foxhounds.
NEWS
By Lois Szymanski and Lois Szymanski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 7, 1997
WAKEFIELD VALLEY Pony Club families saved the club more than $2,000 recently by building jumps."The jumps will be used for fund-raisers for the club. Comparing what we spent to what these jumps would cost if we bought them, we saved several thousand dollars," said Kathy Schmitt, district commissioner of the Westminster-based club, which educates children who ride English about horse care, safety and riding.She said the families got together several times to build and paint jumps. Volunteers built 12 sets of standards (the upright poles that hold the jumps)
NEWS
By Nancy Menefee Jackson and Nancy Menefee Jackson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 24, 2005
Why should young kids have all the fun with their horses? That was a question Lothian's Hope Jacob asked herself when she saw children - members of the U.S. Pony Club - "playing games on horseback." Pony clubs, which provide what might be called the recreational sports of the horse world, are open to riders younger than age 21. They're the first equine experience for many children, offering riding thrills and experience on a child-size scale. "Someone said, `Hope, why don't you do this for adults?
SPORTS
By Aaron Kasinitz and The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2013
Janice Binkley-Cole handed what looked like a makeshift lacrosse stick to Tristan Cole and watched her smiling 10-year-old son head onto a practice field. From the time he left the sideline until he returned about 10 minutes later, Tristan's feet never touched the ground. That's because Tristan plays polocrosse, and in his sport, he doesn't walk, jog or run. He rides a pony. “The funnest part is when you get to run around [on the horse] and go really fast and have good goals,” Tristan said.
NEWS
By Muphen R. Whitney | December 11, 1991
The Wakefield Valley Pony Club is looking for a few good kids."We have 12 members now who all participate in the club's activities, and I think the optimum for us would be about 20 kids at various levels of the Pony Club ratings," says Karen Baker of Westminster, district commissioner of Wakefield Valley. "If you have too many more than that, then the kids have to qualify to go to the regional rallies. This way, everyone gets to go."Former District Commissioner Sarah Levin has made recruiting posters and distributed them to tack shops in an effort to inform young riders about this special organization.
NEWS
By Muphen Whitney and Muphen Whitney,Contributing Writer | September 2, 1992
Taylorsville's Kelly Conaway says that the toughest thing about being on the team that won the gold medal in the junior games competition at the 1992 United States Pony Club National Festival wasn't the long trip to Kentucky or riding in five competitive sessions in three days.It wasn't having to be at the barn at 6 a.m., or spending hours each day vaulting onto ponies and racing around in various games at the Kentucky Horse Park.The toughest thing, says this veteran games competitor, was having to listen to her brother.
SPORTS
By MUPHEN WHITNEY | August 22, 1993
The five-rider team that represented the United States at the recent International Pony Club Games finished second behind the United Kingdom. The Canadian team was third, followed by the team from Australia.Carroll County resident Charlie Conaway III returned from that competition with ribbons, a medal, a two-page itinerary of his travels, some really impressive T-shirts and jackets, and lots of good memories."The most impressive non-horse things that we saw were the castles," Conaway said.
NEWS
By Nancy Menefee Jackson and Nancy Menefee Jackson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 24, 2005
Why should young kids have all the fun with their horses? That was a question Lothian's Hope Jacob asked herself when she saw children - members of the U.S. Pony Club - "playing games on horseback." Pony clubs, which provide what might be called the recreational sports of the horse world, are open to riders younger than age 21. They're the first equine experience for many children, offering riding thrills and experience on a child-size scale. "Someone said, `Hope, why don't you do this for adults?
NEWS
By Lois Szymanski and Lois Szymanski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 7, 1997
WAKEFIELD VALLEY Pony Club families saved the club more than $2,000 recently by building jumps."The jumps will be used for fund-raisers for the club. Comparing what we spent to what these jumps would cost if we bought them, we saved several thousand dollars," said Kathy Schmitt, district commissioner of the Westminster-based club, which educates children who ride English about horse care, safety and riding.She said the families got together several times to build and paint jumps. Volunteers built 12 sets of standards (the upright poles that hold the jumps)
NEWS
By Lois Szymanski and Lois Szymanski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 20, 1997
ON JAN. 12, 10 members of Wakefield Valley Pony Club took a field trip to Horse World Expo.The expo, the first event of its kind in Maryland, offered goods for horse enthusiasts, with more than 100 vendors participating. Seminars, demonstrations, breed profiles, and training exhibitions ran at the Cow Palace at Maryland State Fairgrounds.Some of the top horse trainers in Maryland were on hand to share their expertise. For the young members of the Westminster-based branch of the U.S. Pony Club, the expo offered an opportunity to learn more about their passion while spending time together.
NEWS
By SALLY BUCKLER | September 15, 1994
Imagine galloping along a beach in Australia on a pony. Imagine visiting the Australian Parliament in a limousine. Imagine playing on the United States Pony Club International Games Team.Michael Brinkley of Mount Airy doesn't have to imagine. The U.S. Pony Club selected Michael as one of five United States competitors on its International Games Team that went to Australia last month.For 20 years, the United States team has competed against teams from Great Britain, Australia and Canada, and Great Britain usually wins the pony games.
SPORTS
By MUPHEN WHITNEY | August 22, 1993
The five-rider team that represented the United States at the recent International Pony Club Games finished second behind the United Kingdom. The Canadian team was third, followed by the team from Australia.Carroll County resident Charlie Conaway III returned from that competition with ribbons, a medal, a two-page itinerary of his travels, some really impressive T-shirts and jackets, and lots of good memories."The most impressive non-horse things that we saw were the castles," Conaway said.
SPORTS
By MUPHEN WHITNEY | March 28, 1993
Even though it was Saturday, it certainly seemed like a school day at last weekend's United States Pony Club Capital Region Know-Down at the Shipley School in Harper's Ferry, W.Va. There were tests, tests and more tests all day long.The Howard County Pony Club acquitted itself well, cominhome with two firsts, four seconds, a third and a fourth-place finish. Howard's eight teams -- and their four "Little Guys" (kids under 8 who do not take a written test) -- competed against Pony Club teams from Catoctin, Potomac, Frederick, Pax River and Seneca Valley regions.
NEWS
By Muphen R. Whitney | March 18, 1992
Do you know the difference between a black horse and a dark brown horse? Do you know what a capping fee is? Or how to change your diagonal at the trot? Or how many beats to a walk and a canter? (Answers below.)You could have learned the answers to these and other horse-related questions at last Saturday's United States Pony Club's CapitalRegion Know-Down here. A Know-Down is Pony Club's version of "It's Academic" or "Jeopardy," a chance to test knowledge of all sorts of horse-related facts.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2013
Patricia du Pont, founder of the Fair Hill Pony Club who was active in animal rescue work, died Feb. 16 from complications of a stroke at her home in Fairview, Cecil County. She was 94. The daughter of Archibald du Pont, who had been CEO of the Delaware Trust Bank, and Elizabeth Hayward du Pont, a homemaker, she was born and raised in Wilmington, Del. She was a graduate of St. Timothy's School. An accomplished horsewoman, show rider and avid fox hunter, Miss du Pont enjoyed fox hunting with the Elkridge-Harford Hunt Club, and hunted with her own pack of foxhounds.
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